Virginia Prescott

Host - On Second Thought

Virginia Prescott is the Gracie Award-winning host of On Second Thought for Georgia Public Broadcasting. Before joining GPB, she was host of Word of Mouth, Writers on A New England Stage and the I-Tunes Top Ten Podcasts Civics 101 and The 10-Minute Writers Workshop on New Hampshire Public Radio. Prior to joining NHPR, she was editor, producer, and director on NPR programs On Point and Here & Now, and Director of Interactive media for New York Public Radio.

Throughout her radio career, Virginia has worked to build sustainable independent radio in the developing world and has trained journalists in post-conflict zones from Sierra Leone to the Balkans. She was a member of the Peabody Award-winning production team for Jazz from Lincoln Center with Ed Bradley and the recipient of a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University.

Virginia loves working as a radio and podcast host, but regrets that so many good outfits go unnoticed.

Screenshot by GPB

Type any word into Google, and the search engine will offer a drop-down list of suggestions for what you should type next. So if you type "Russia collusion," Google suggests you complete your search with "delusion."

 


GPB

Experts call it a major game-changer for cold-case investigations: DNA and genetic genealogy. These methods can also identify living people. For example, DNA profiles pulled from publicly available ancestry websites were used to identify and arrest The Golden State Killer for a series of murders dating back to the 1970s and 80s. Cece Moore is chief genetic genealogist with Parabon Nanolabs and PBS’s Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. She talked about the relationship between DNA and law enforcement.

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While Atlanta remains on Amazon’s short list for its second headquarters, not everyone likes what the company brings with it. Currently, the ACLU and Amazon employees have demanded the company to stop marketing its facial recognition technology to law enforcement. Amazon calls the technology Rekognition. It detects and analyzes not only faces, but objects and entire scenes. Ayanna Howard, chairman of the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech and Ali Breland, tech/policy reporter at The Hill spoke about the biases in artificial intelligence and privacy concerns with technology.

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Experts call it a major game-changer for cold-case investigations: DNA and genetic genealogy. These methods can also identify living people. For example, DNA profiles pulled from publicly available ancestry websites were used to identify and arrest The Golden State Killer for a series of murders dating back to the 1970s and 80s. Cece Moore is chief genetic genealogist with Parabon Nanolabs and PBS’s Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. She talked about the relationship between DNA and law enforcement.

 

GPB

Adult businesses recently lost a few more rounds against the City of Sandy Springs. The Georgia Supreme Court ruled against an appeal by Maxim Cabaret challenging the constitutionality of Sandy Springs's ban of alcohol sales and zoning restrictions on strip clubs and other adult businesses. Sandy Springs established those restrictions and that ban in 2006.


Wikimedia Commons

Have you been listening to the economic news lately? If you find your mind jumbled with talk of trade, taxes and tariffs, you're not alone. Even people who took basic economics in college or those who regularly read financial news are swimming in language that boggles the mind — whether we admit it or not —  so On Second Thought broke it all down. 


Wikimedia Commons

Adult businesses recently lost a few more rounds against the City of Sandy Springs. The Georgia Supreme Court ruled against an appeal by Maxim Cabaret challenging the constitutionality of Sandy Springs's ban of alcohol sales and zoning restrictions on strip clubs and other adult businesses. Sandy Springs established those restrictions and that ban in 2006.


GPB

The Fearless Girl now has some company in New York's male-dominated financial district. Lauren Simmons became the only full-time female floor broker at the New York Stock Echange in March, when she joined Rosenblatt Securities. She's from Marietta, Georgia and a graduate of Kennesaw State University. At 23, Simmons is the youngest trader on the floor of the Stock Exchange. She is also the second African-American woman ever to work full-time as a trader there.


La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Monica Pearson changed the face of local news in Atlanta in 1975 when she became the first woman and African-American to anchor the evening news on WSB-TV. Pearson went on to cover seven United States presidents, six Georgia governors and a state that nearly doubled in size during her years at the anchor desk. Pearson has told other peoples’ stories for nearly four decades. Today, we got to hear hers.

 

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What makes a Millennial? A recent Pew Research Center study says it's anyone born from 1982-2000. But "Millennial" also means viewing climate change and conflict as the most critical issues, according to the most recent World Economic Forum Global Shapers Survey.


 

LinkedIn / Wikimedia Commons

There are some famous statues on Wall Street: the Charging Bull, the Great Bear and another one that went viral last year on social media — a young girl, chin up, hands firmly on her hips. She's the Fearless Girl, and she now has some company in New York's male-dominated financial district. Lauren Simmons became the only full-time female floor broker at the New York Stock Echange in March, when she joined Rosenblatt Securities. She's from Marietta, Georgia and a graduate of Kennesaw State University.


PBS/GPB

The Great American Read has started a national conversation about America's favorite books. For the PBS series, you are invited to join in — and vote —  for your favorite. GPB has designed a quiz that reveals which fictional character you most resemble.


 

GPB

Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


Emmanuel Johnson / NextGen Radio

Atlanta sports fans, rejoice. The Braves are leading the National League - East by four games. Atlanta United continues to dominate the Eastern Conference in Major League Soccer, and landed six of its players on the all star game roster for this year. Plus, the Atlanta Dream is ranked third in the Eastern Conference of the WNBA, despite a close loss to the Chicago Sky on June 27.


cameronestrada / Flickr

Starting this Sunday, Georgia drivers will no longer be able to hold phones while driving. We were curious about which other activities have been considered unsafe while driving. A little digging revealed that ever since humans sat behind the wheel, they've found reasons to take their eyes off the road — and at some time and place in American history, laws have been proposd to ban just about all of them. One of the first distractions? The car radio. 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Sadie Colbert

Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


GPB

Before the end of his term as Atlanta mayor, Kasim Reed announced the expansion of Piedmont Park. The Atlanta City Council recently approved the $100 million expansion. It would require $80 million from the private sector and $20 million would be given by the city of Atlanta.

 

 


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


Bill Bishoff / Flickr

Before the end of his term as Atlanta mayor, Kasim Reed announced the expansion of Piedmont Park. The Atlanta City Council recently approved the $100 million expansion. It would require $80 million from the private sector and $20 million would be given by the city of Atlanta.

 

 


Summer Evans / GPB

The Atlanta Jewish Times has a history as varied and complicated as the community it covers. In 1924, the Southern Israelite was founded as a family-owned paper. The name changed in the 1980s, when it was bought by a Jewish paper in Baltimore. A series of buy-outs and editorial hand-offs later, Michael Jacobs became editor — a position he's held twice in the past 13 years. 


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