On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Wikimedia Commons / Author Unknown

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low.  Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

STEPHEN FOWLER / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Last September, Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot to death by a campus police officer. According to investigators, Schultz called 911 to report an armed suspicious person on campus. When police arrived, they found Schultz holding a blade. After repeated commands to drop it, an officer opened fire. Schultz, who was suicidal, was one of 30 Georgians shot and killed by police last year.

LA Johnson / NPR

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. Under DACA, some 800,000 young immigrants, often referred to as "Dreamers," can legally live and work in the U.S. One of those Dreamers is Valentina Emilia Garcia Gonzalez, who moved from Uruguay to Gwinnett County. She told us how the DACA program has helped her.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Monday, January 15, 2018 would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 89th birthday. His legacy remains strong. Nearly a decade after his death in 1968, President Jimmy Carter awarded Dr. King the posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. Producer Sean Powers takes us back to that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

Hayes Buchanan / Creative Loafing

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines.

Sean Powers / GPB

The Breakroom gang has a lot of news to cover this week. We’ll talk about Oprah’s impassioned Golden Globes speech, why more college students are finding sugar daddies, and what UGA’s big loss means for Georgia football fans. We also look at the rising popularity of cassette tapes, wonder if cash is going out of style, and ask if kids are spending too much time on smart phones. Joining us in the Breakroom are Natalie Pawelski, Charles Richardson, Sam Burnham, and Amber Scott.

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines. Creative Loafing announced last month it would cut its staff, after transitioning from weekly to monthly earlier in the year. We talk about the role of alternative magazines with Keith Herndon, Professor of Journalism at the University of Georgia. He is also author of the book, ‘The Decline of the Daily Newspaper.’

We’ve all seen it: somebody shops on their work computer, or takes really long lunches, or “borrows” supplies. The workplace doesn’t always foster the most ethical behavior. But recent University of Georgia research shows it can get worse than that. Many employees lie on their timesheets, and even trash their co-workers to get ahead. We discuss with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. And Karen Rommelfanger, a professor from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University.

SpaceX continues to make headlines, sending its Falcon rockets into space and if Georgia has its way, those rockets could soon blast off from Camden County.

A public report on Camden County’s bid for a spaceport came out recently. Laura Forczyk is an author of it, and the owner of Astralytical. The Atlanta-based consulting firm is working on Camden County’s plans for a launch site.

 

This hour we get into some serious questions about science, economic development and where the two meet. But first, we revisit a conversation about the power of curiosity for its own sake. The Ig Nobel Prizes reward silliness in science. They’ve been awarded annually since 1991, to honor achievements that first make you laugh, then make you think. Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang won one in 2015. She joins the show with Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes.

Misenus1 / Foter

Little is known about the Alpha-Gal allergy. The condition causes people to break out or experience more severe conditions after eating meat. The allergy has spread via the Lone Star tick, a deadly culprit making its way across the Southeast. 

Mel Evans / AP Photo

More Americans are choosing to rent rather than buy homes. That’s especially true in Atlanta, which saw a 67 percent jump in rentals between 2010 and 2015 -- one of the highest rates in the country. We talk about this trend with Dan Immergluck, Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University.

GPB News / Emily Cureton

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention  translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

  

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention under the Gold Dome translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The third and final installment of the Pitch Perfect film series is out now in theaters. Pitch Perfect 3 was produced in Atlanta. On Second Thought regular Kalena Boller goes behind the scenes with Ryan Christopher Taylor of Marietta, who worked as a key assistant location manager on the film. 

This story was recorded for the podcast "The Credits." It's produced by Zero Mile Media.

The High Museum of Art

One of the ways we learn about the world’s many cultures is through art, but art museums have struggled to diversify their patrons. In Atlanta, the High Museum of Art has made some important to strides in that regard. In the last few years, the museum’s non-white audience has tripled.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years.

 

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years. We get a preview from GPB’s senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson and University of Georgia sports journalism professor Vicki Michaelis.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joined host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news.

Marvel Studios/Disney

There are a lot of major productions currently filming in Georgia. We talked with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the fourth Avengers movie and the Ant-Man sequel. Also on the docket: Son of Shaft, Ozark Season 2, and YouTube’s Karate Kid reboot.

 

DoNotLick / Flickr

Savannah’s City Council recently approved a resolution to rename the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge. Its namesake served four terms as Georgia’s governor and was a defender of segregation.

The Avengers: Infinity War  was shot in Georgia recently. Another Avengers cast and crew are at work here, along with a slew of movies and TV shows. We talk about who’s working on what with Jennifer Brett. She writes the Buzz Blog for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Eric Gales

In the 1990s, blues guitarist Eric Gales was hailed as a child prodigy. With his left-handed playing technique, many compared the Memphis, Tennessee musician to Jimi Hendrix himself. Gales’ latest record is called ‘Middle of the Road,’ released last year. He’ll perform at Terminal West in Atlanta tomorrow night [Jan. 5] at 9 p.m. Producer Trevor Young caught up with him last week.

Actress Issa Rae got the attention of many audiences in 2011 with her popular Web series, "The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl." Five years later, her latest project is an HBO series called "Insecure.” Rae is up for a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy TV Series this Sunday. We revisit a conversation with Rae about her new show and what she wishes she could tell her dad.

GPB News / Cindy Hill

When Tom Barton started working as a reporter in Savannah, the newsroom was filled with cigarette smoke and typewriters. Some 39 years later, the long-time opinion page editor is retiring. His last day with the Savannah Morning News is this week, January 5. We catch up with Barton about his career, and which stories made a difference.

Wikimedia Commons / Ken Lund.

Georgia lawmakers convene the second week of January. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

jypsygen

Last month, the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality. Those regulations prohibit broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for higher-quality service. But a lot of people still don’t understand what net neutrality is all about, so we break it down. Then, we take a look at how rural healthcare initiatives in Georgia will suffer without net neutrality in place.

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