On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Macon-Bibb County officials have met in the past year to discuss why there are so many pedestrian fatalities in the area. The Georgia Department of Public Health found the county has the second highest rate of pedestrian deaths in the state. We speak with Macon-Bibb Board of Health member Chris Tsavatewa about what needs to be done to address this problem. We also hear from Angie Schmitt, editor of Streetsblog USA, about how pedestrian fatalities look across the country.

The Breakroom gang is back in action. We talk about why people feel the need to raid grocery stores before an impending storm, how ParkAtlanta has issued tons of bogus parking tickets, and the Pope’s recent decision to give the go-ahead for women to breastfeed in church.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

A favorite pastime for many people is playing with model trains. It can be exciting to watch them whiz by on tiny tracks. Recently, model train enthusiasts of all stripes came to Atlanta for a the World's Greatest Hobby on Tour, a show promoting model railroading across all gauges for all ages. GPB’s Sean Powers stopped by and sent us this audio postcard.

Back when Republican Scott Walker was competing for the presidential nomination, one of his aides came under fire after she posted a series of unflattering tweets about Iowa and its politics. Republicans in the Hawkeye State objected and within 24 hours, she resigned. This story gained national attention because of Iowa’s powerful role in the presidential nomination process. But would the outcome have been different if it was another state? That’s what Washington Post reporter Philip Bump set out to answer.

A problem with some fantasy fiction narratives is the misogynistic treatment of female characters. The sci-fi world may still be very much dominated by men behind the scenes, but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been female trailblazers. A new book explores some of those unsung heroines.

A new study from the University of Georgia shows birds, like White Ibises, have a high risk of contracting and spreading Salmonella in congested areas like urban parks. The study furthermore suggests feeding of these birds corrupts their ecosystem, and hopes to dissuade pedestrians and city planners from creating this mutually harmful environment. We’ll speak with researcher Dr. Sonia Hernandez. She’s an Associate Professor at the School of Forestry and Natural Resources and College of Veterinary Medicine at UGA.

What It Means To Teach 'Black Self-Love'

Jan 11, 2017
Aiyanna Sanders

A new course at Emory University entitled “The Power of Black Self-Love” teaches the history and culture of African-American lives. It explores the ideas behind self-confidence, social movements, and celebratory spaces fostered through social media. 

In the studio are class co-creators Dianne Stewart, Associate Professor of Religion & African American Studies at Emory, and Donna Troka, Assistant Professor at the Institute for the Liberal Arts there. We’re also be joined by student Gretel Nabeta, a junior at Emory.

cuatrok77 / Foter

A new study from the University of Georgia shows birds, like White Ibises, have a high risk of contracting and spreading Salmonella in congested areas like urban parks. The study furthermore suggests feeding of these birds corrupts their ecosystem, and hopes to dissuade pedestrians and city planners from creating this mutually harmful environment.

We speak with researcher Dr. Sonia Hernandez. She’s an Associate Professor at the School of Forestry and Natural Resources and College of Veterinary Medicine at UGA. 

More than two-thirds of Americans don’t use a budget. But whenever they poll young people on what they wish they learned in school, basic money management ends up in the top 10. Host Celeste Headlee learned about budgeting the hard way - by making disastrous financial decisions. She was never taught the difference between compound interest and simple interest. So, she takes us inside her home for a look at how she’s teaching her son to budget. Plus, we talk to Sherilyn Narker of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta about why it’s important to budget.

Sean MacEntee / flickr

A new report slots Georgia third in the nation for credit card debt. The website Creditcards.com figured the average credit card debt and median income in each state, and in this case, being high on the list is bad news. We talked more about this with Atlanta financial advisor Cecily Welch.

Stefano Brega / flickr

Pigs are a huge part of Georgia’s economy. They can also cause a lot of problems. A University of Georgia report last year says feral swine caused nearly $99 million in crop damage and $51 million in non-crop damage in 2014. But that doesn’t mean we should hate these animals.

pburka / Foter

The Georgia Lottery has recently come under audit by the state government. News broke last week that the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts was questioning the Georgia Lottery Corporation’s spending practices.

 

Bread for the World / Foter

The Georgia Legislature, House and Senate, both have a chaplain. They are usually Protestant Christians, who starts every day with a short devotional and prayer. It is a long-hallowed tradition. Legislators invite the speakers.

But our state’s religious profile is constantly changing. That change raises the question: should there be more faiths represented in these daily prayers? Or, should there even be a religious ceremony in a place where laws are made?

The Georgia Legislature, House and Senate, both have a chaplain. They are usually Protestant Christians, who starts every day with a short devotional and prayer. It is a long-hallowed tradition. Legislators invite the speakers.

Keenan Jones / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, Soumaya Khalifa ​of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, and Natalie Pawelski of of Cater Communications.

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Actress Issa Rae got the attention of many audiences in 2011 with her popular Web series, "The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl." Five years later, her latest project is an HBO series called "Insecure.” Rae is up for a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy TV Series this Sunday. We revisit a conversation with Rae about her new show and what she wishes she could tell her dad.

Jonathan Splitlog

Atlanta-based songwriter Anthony Aparo is best known as the front man for the band Culture Culture and a performer for the local collaboration ATL Collective. Anthony is featured in an upcoming GPB Music Session, and gave us two more tunes for our essential Georgia Playlist. Picks include songs by OutKast and Drivin’ n Cryin’. 

Vince Dooley racked up more than 200 wins, six SEC championships, and a national football championship. Dooley has also written a number of books, including a volume on gardening. But for his first article in a scholarly journal, Dooley chose to revisit football history. In 1942, and there were not one, but two football teams at the University of Georgia.  Both ranked as top in the nation. Coach Vince Dooley joined us in 2015 to talk about that history.

 

 

Our series Pulitzer Peaches continues. In it, we feature Pulitzer winners from or connected to the state of Georgia. We talk to author Edward Larson. He won his Pulitzer for History in 1998, for the book “Summer of the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate over Science and Religion”.

Larson is formerly a professor of History at the University of Georgia, and still serves there as senior fellow at the Institute of Higher Education. 

The City of Atlanta announced last month it is the test pilot for a new, software-based trash pick-up system. Atlanta is the first partner of waste management company Rubicon Global. That company says the program will cut costs for the city and help combat climate change. We talked to Atlanta sustainability director Stephanie Stuckey-Benfield and Michael Allegretti, who is the head of public policy for Rubicon Global.

Andreas Solberg / Foter

Let’s talk some trash. The City of Atlanta announced last month it is the test pilot for a new, software-based trash pick-up system. Atlanta is the first partner of waste management company Rubicon Global—who says the program will cut costs for the city and help combat climate change.

Gripe Bag: Price Tag Stickers

Jan 4, 2017
newrulefarah / YouTube

Many people wound up with excellent gifts during the holidays, but one really annoying thing is getting something with a sticky price tag on it. On Second Thought's acting senior producer Don Smith has a thing or two to say about those pesky price tags.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta teenager Nzinga Braswell, 17, traveled to Ghana in 2015 and documented her journey on film. The result was “A Queen’s Discovery,” which was recently honored by a PBS film festival. The film compares Nzinga's Black American experience with what she saw in Africa. We talked about the documentary with her and her father Kenneth, who is the director of President Obama’s Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse.

 

Georgia Institute of Technology

The first living organisms on Earth were probably single-celled organisms similar to bacteria. It took eons for those tiny forms to evolve into humans. But how did they begin? Georgia Tech researcher Nick Hud is working to answer that question. We talked with him about his work to discover the root of life on Earth.

 

 

Wikimedia Commons

​In​ ​November,​ ​voters​ ​approved​ ​the creation​ ​of​ ​two​ ​new​ ​cities​ ​-​ ​South​ ​Fulton​ ​in​ ​Fulton ​County​ ​and​ ​Stonecrest in​ ​DeKalb​ ​County.​ ​New​ ​commissions​ ​appointed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​governor​ ​are working​ ​to​ ​help​ ​each​ ​community​ ​operate.​ ​We talked more abou

Solar Energy Industries Association

As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office, it is unclear what effect his administration might have on renewable energy. Trump has raised concerns about wind and solar energy, and several of his Cabinet picks have ties to the oil and gas industry. However, the renewable fuel industry may have reason to be hopeful.

Salvation Army USA West / Foter

When​ ​Joan​ ​Kroc​ ​died,​ ​she​ ​gave​ ​billions​ ​to​ ​various​ ​charities--money​ ​that her​ ​husband​ ​Ray earned​ ​as​ ​the​ ​founder​ ​of​ ​McDonald’s.​ ​Kroc​ ​left​ ​$225​ ​million​ ​to NPR,​ ​but​ ​she​ ​also​ ​gave​ ​almost​ ​two​ ​​billion​​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Salvation​ ​Army​ ​to​ ​build magnificent​ ​recreation​ ​centers​ ​in​ ​poor​ ​communities—including​ ​one​ ​in Atlanta.​ ​​ ​

As​ ​President-elect​ ​Donald​ ​Trump​ ​prepares​ ​to​ ​take​ ​office,​ ​it’s​ ​unclear​ ​what affect​ ​his​ ​administration​ ​might​ ​have​ ​on​ ​renewable​ ​energy,​ ​like​ ​solar​ ​and wind.​ ​Several​ ​of​ ​his​ ​Cabinet​ ​picks​ ​have​ ​ties​ ​to​ ​the​ ​oil​ ​and​ ​gas​ ​industry. 

Trump​ ​is​ ​also​ ​a​ ​vocal​ ​supporter​ ​of​ ​coal.​ ​But​ ​the​ ​renewable​ ​fuel​ ​industry may​ ​have​ ​reason​ ​to​ ​be​ ​hopeful.​ ​A​ ​new​ ​report​ ​by​ ​the​ ​World​ ​Economic Forum​ ​says​ ​in​ ​more​ ​than​ ​30​ ​countries,​ ​the​ ​cost​ ​of​ ​wind​ ​and​ ​solar​ ​power has​ ​dropped​ ​to​ ​rates​ ​that​ ​are​ ​the​ ​same​ ​or​ ​cheaper​ ​than​ ​fossil​ ​fuels.​ ​And that​ ​could​ ​be​ ​good​ ​news​ ​for​ ​Georgia,​ ​as​ ​our​ ​state​ ​is​ ​a​ ​leader​ ​in​ ​the​ ​solar industry. We speak to ​Peter​ ​Dykstra, ​publisher​ ​of​ ​Environmental​ ​Health News.​ ​And ​Don​ ​Moreland,​ ​chair​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Georgia Solar​ ​Energy​ ​Association.​

All this week, we presented the producers' favorite segments from 2016. Each day was programmed by a different "On Second Thought" producer. Today is GPB CEO Teya Ryan’s favorite segments about Southern food.

This week, the "On Second Thought" team revisits some of the best conversations during the last year. Acting senior producer Don Smith spends this show looking back on conversations with Georgia authors.

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