On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

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Studies from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation show disparities in breast cancer outcomes among African-American women compared to white women.

 

A 2016 Cancer Epidemiology study shows Atlanta has the widest gap in breast cancer mortality rates between African-American women and white women of any U.S. city. That’s with 44 black patients per 100,000 residents dying, compared to 20 per 100,000 white women.

 

Courtesy of the Peabody Awards

Every year, the George Foster Peabody Awards honor “stories that matter.” Founded and archived at the University of Georgia, the awards are often called the Pulitzer Prize of broadcast.

Between several categories — individual/institutional, documentary, entertainment, news, radio/podcast and public service — 60 finalists are chosen. From those 60, the Peabody Awards board of jurors selects 30 winners. The board's decisions must be unanimous.

This year's winners include HBO's "Insecure," Netflix's "Hasan Minhaj: Homecoming King," Vice News's coverage of the violent neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the "S-Town podcast" from This American Life and Serial.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Ready to put your winter clothes away? Not so fast. Although temperatures across the state are predicted to reach into the 70s this weekend, cooler than average spring weather is projected to stick around Georgia until at least the beginning of May. In Atlanta, lows have approached century-old records for this time of year. In middle and south Georgia, the National Weather Service projects a 40 percent chance of below normal temperatures. 

Britt Reints / Wikimedia Commons

For Mark Sanchez, being a peach grower means "you pretty much stay worried all year."

That's because for peaches to bloom in the spring, peach trees have to stay cold in the winter. At Lane Southern Orchards in Fort Valley, Georgia, that means getting 650-850 "chill hours" — or hours under 45 degrees Fahrenheit — between November and February. But last year, conditions didn't even come within range. By Sanchez's estimate, Fort Valley only got about 550 cold hours. Whereas a typical peach season goes through mid-August, Lane wrapped up operations in early July.

So after this year's cold winter, Sanchez, Lane's CEO, is more optimistic. 

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book Cook & Tell, in 2017. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

What does it mean to have an awakening? For Christopher Paul Curtis, it meant finding his calling in his 40s. After working for more than a decade in Detroit's automobile manufacturing industry, Curtis began writing children's books about the African American experience. His 1996 novel "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" earned him a John Newbery Medal, making him the first African American man to win this honor. He won again in 2000 for "Bud, Not Buddy" and in 2008 for "Elijah of Buxton." We spoke with Curtis in 2017. 

Spring has arrived in Georgia. Are you ready to relax outside with a good book? We asked Literary Atlanta podcast host Alison Law and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo to tell us about the best new books by Southern writers. We also talked with the Breakroom gang about the most discussed news items of the week.

Courtesy of Kendrick Lamar

This week we talked about mandatory gun owernship laws, Vidalia onions and the Pulitzer Prize — and that doesn't even include the week's news. On Second Thought host Tony Harris sat down with our Breakroom panel to process everything that happened.

Literary Atlanta podcast host Alison Law and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo joined us in studio to share their picks of the best new books by Southern writers. 

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

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