On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

First, last week, Georgia’s public health commissioner was named as the new head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here in Atlanta. Brenda Fitzgerald was chosen by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a former Georgia congressman. The last permanent director of the CDC was Tom Frieden, who was appointed by President Obama in 2009. We re-visit our conversation with Frieden, who talked about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there in the future.

Daniel LaChance

A new book by Emory History Professor Daniel LaChance tackles the changing perception of capital punishment in America. He argues the court trial, the sentencing, and the execution process are all deeply societal events that reflect the public’s relationship with government. Daniel LaChance joins us in studio.

First, the battle for voter data is reaching a tipping point in Georgia. Last week, a lawsuit filed in Fulton County Superior Court seeks to overturn the results of the 6th District congressional election, alleging a voter data breach at an election center at Kennesaw State University influenced the outcome. And a new restraining order is looking to bar President Trump from obtaining voter information in Georgia. We talk about these issues with Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The battle for voter data is reaching a tipping point in Georgia. Last week, a lawsuit filed in Fulton County Superior Court seeks to overturn the results of the 6th District congressional election, alleging a voter data breach at an election center at Kennesaw State University influenced the outcome.

Kindercore Vinyl

Kindercore Vinyl in Athens is bringing analog music back to Georgia. The pressing plant is the newest and only such record producer in the state, and one of fewer than 30 in the country. We talk with Kindercore president Ryan Lewis.

Takénobu

Atlanta cellist Nick Ogawa, better known as ‘Takénobu," takes the cello beyond the orchestra. His latest album, “Reversal,” uses loops and percussive sounds to create thick soundscapes. We catch up with Takénobu ahead of a performance at Eddie’s Attic in Decatur tomorrow night, July 13.

Steve Johnson / flickr

“Boil Before Using” was the rule for tap water in several Atlanta neighborhoods last week ... not long after we learned about undetected lead contamination in many Georgia waterways. Now, a recent study by the Natural Resources Defense Council shows Georgia leads most states in drinking water violations, most of them in rural areas.

Other Press

On this day in 1773, the first Jewish settlers arrived in Savannah. They founded what has become the oldest Jewish congregation in the South. Nearly two centuries later, Savannah again became a refuge for Jewish immigrants. Author Jonathan Rabb explores this difficult transition in his novel, "Among The Living.” We talk to him about the book, and researching Jewish communities in Georgia. 

A recent study by the Natural Resources Defense Council shows Georgia leads most states in drinking water violations. Most happen in rural areas. We talk about the findings with Erik Olson, the NRDC’s health program director.

Then, 40 years ago President Jimmy Carter posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Dr.  Martin Luther King, Jr. The civil rights icon had died about a decade earlier. Our producer Sean Powers takes us back to the day MLK was honored at the White House with this audio postcard.

University of Georgia Press

Jurist Leah Ward Sears is a trailblazer. On top of being the first woman, and youngest person to sit on Georgia's Supreme Court, she was also the first African-American female Chief Justice in the United States. A new biography about her life, called “Seizing Serendipity" by Rebecca Davis, tracks her rise to success from humble Georgia beginnings.

The Associated Press

Forty years ago, President Jimmy Carter awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. some ten years after his death. The civil rights icon was assassinated in 1968. Producer Sean Powers took us back to that day at the White House with this audio postcard.

The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History

This year marks 155 years since a daring operation happened in Georgia to try and end the Civil War. A team of Union soldiers planned to steal a train, and destroy railroad bridges, tunnels, and telegraph lines to the South. All of this was a plot to derail the Confederacy. The locomotive captured in that raid is now on display at the Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History in Kennesaw.

Wikipedia

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department/Savannah Morning News via AP

Over the holiday weekend, three people in Savannah were killed following a shooting and car crash. Savannah has one of the highest murder rates in Georgia.

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included Kennesaw State University professor Roxanne Donovan, writer and blogger Jessica Szilagyi, business owner Ruel Joyner, and Korean Daily reporter HB Cho.

Flickr

President Trump has created a commission to investigate voter fraud. Most states are refusing to hand over their registration records. But Georgia’s leadership has agreed to release extensive personal information about voters here. Blogger Sam Burnham takes issue with this. He brings us this commentary.

Max Pixel

Georgia still calls itself the Peach State. But California ships about 680,000 tons more peaches than we do. Might it be time to rebrand the Peach State? AJC columnist George Mathis III brings us this commentary.

Flickr

Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults.  Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

In recent years, newspapers and magazines have moved to all digital formats. But one magazine in Georgia is making a print comeback. This year Decatur-based Paste Magazine started a quarterly magazine that looks and feels different. The second edition just came out. We learn more about the magazine’s reboot with founder and editor-in-chief, Josh Jackson.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Parts of President Trump’s travel ban went into effect last week, but the change might be temporary. The U.S. Supreme Court lifted an injunction on the ban and will review the case this fall. The revised ban temporarily affects some travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries.

First, the City of Atlanta plans to raise the minimum wage for city workers to $15 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class? We talk about the pros and cons with Kristy Offitt, Employment Litigator for Ogletree Deakins in Atlanta. And Tom Smith, Assistant Professor of Finance at Emory University.

Foter

Georgia is facing a huge increase in youth suicides this year. More than 20 known deaths so far in 2017 reveal a record trend, and no clusters or identifiable causes have been attributed to the troubling numbers. We talk about the issue with Trebor Randle, Special Agent for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation’s Child Fatality Review Unit. And Tim Elmore, president of the non-profit Growing Leaders, which works to raise awareness about teen mental health.

 

 

David Goldman / AP Photo

The City of Atlanta announced last month it would raise the minimum wage for city workers to $13 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. And like other cities, $13 is just a starting point, gradually going up to $15 by the 2020 Fiscal Year. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class?

Khalid Kamau

South Fulton is Georgia’s newest city. But one of its recently elected councilmen says the local media couldn’t care less. In a recent letter to the editor of GeorgiaPol, Khalid Kamau charges news outlets with a bias against the African-American community. Kamau brings us a commentary.

Public Domain Pictures

The Smithsonian Channel just launched a new series called “America in Color.” The five part program features historical film footage from the 1920s through the 1960s, presented in HD and with the addition of color. We talk about the show with the Executive Producer, John Cavanagh.

The Breakrooms returns to discuss the new Transformers movie, covfefe, and Russian jets. Our guests are Soumaya Khalifa, Kalena Boller, Amber Scott, and Steve Brown. 

First, the Smithsonian Channel just launched a new series called “America in Color.” The five part program features historical film footage from the 1920s through the 1960s, presented in HD and with the addition of color. We talk about the show’s Georgia ties with the Executive Producer, John Cavanagh.

Homeless Pets are everywhere in Georgia. The issue has been labeled the biggest challenge facing shelter and rescue operations in our state. We spoke with Gloria Dorsey, vice president of Community Education at the Atlanta Humane Society. We also heard from Jessica Rock, a founding partner at Animal Law Source.  

A new café in Atlanta caters to cats and their humans. At Java Cats Café, you can order coffee and hang out with adoptable cats. GPB’s Sean Powers stopped by to learn more about this purrfectly feline coffee shop. 

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