On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Alan Rhew

When we think of Southern Gothic, a lot of names come to mind: Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy. Critics include North Carolina-based author David Joy in that category. His new novel, "The Weight of this World," takes us into a gritty, seamy world in rural Appalachia. Characters are tormented by their own demons, roused by painful memories of a small town and memories of war.

Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

We talked with Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist Robert Coram, who is used to writing about other people’s lives. He’s written a number of biographies, but his new book focuses on his own life. It is called "Gully Dirt: On Exposing the Klan, Raising a Hog, and Escaping the South."

 

 

Design Feast / Foter

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a  number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Disney

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Jessica Leigh Lebos of Connect Savannah, Amy Condon of Savannah Magazine, Steve Brown of the Fayette County Board of Commissioners, and Milledgeville farmer Jon Jackson.

 BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Cindy Hill / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Our in-house musician for the Friday broadcast of our live show from Savannah was Christopher Paul Stelling. He is performing at the Savannah Stopover Music Festival. Stelling is originally from Daytona Beach, Florida, but is now based in North Carolina. His debut album, “Songs of Praise and Scorn,” was released in 2012. Since then, he’s released two more records, and was invited to perform at NPR Music for a Tiny Desk Concert.

geoff_in_dubai / flickr

The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of shark fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

On Second Thought is broadcasting from Savannah for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival. As the first of two house bands for the trip, listeners got to hear Savannah's own Lulu the Giant, fronted by bassist Rachael Shaner. As much jazz combo as rock band, Lulu the Giant's sound is built around Shaner's stand up bass and love of the blues. Enjoy this live session with the band, recorded at The Grey Restaurant. 

Go back almost 110 years, and you couldn’t find a place in Savannah that was legally serving alcohol. Georgia went dry the first day of 1908, and stayed that way more than 25 years, until Prohibition was repealed. A museum in Savannah opening next month tells the Prohibition story from the first drop to the last. We got a preview from the museum’s manager, Kayla Black.

 

A group of artists are coming together in Savannah to champion women’s rights. "The Personal is Political" is a new exhibit which explores “the relationship between personal experience and the political structures we navigate in our daily lives.” Art Rise Savannah and Planned Parenthood Southeast are teaming up for this exhibition, which opens Friday at the Art Rise Gallery. We talked about it with Heather McRae, exhibitions director at Art Rise Savannah. We also talked with Niki Johnson, whose work is featured in the exhibit.

Kayne Lanahan founded the Stopover Music Festival seven years ago. She left New York City for Savannah after a successful advertising and marketing career. Since then, she’s become a loud pulse in Georgia’s bustling music scene. We asked her to add to our ongoing series, the Georgia Playlist. She chose works by R.E.M. and Neutral Milk Hotel.

Savannah Stopover Music Festival

The Savannah Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

We did a live show from The Grey restaurant in Savannah, Georgia for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival.

 

 

The Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Georgia singer Jamie Barton is a rising star in the opera world. She’s only 35 but her voice has filled concert halls all over the world. In 2015, she nabbed the prestigious Richard Tucker Award. It’s a $50,000 prize sometimes called the "Heisman Trophy" of Music. But Barton hails from a place not often associated with grand opera--Rome, Georgia. We revisit a conversation with Jamie about finding a passion for opera in an unusual setting.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

Photo courtesy of Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim is bringing back “Samurai Jack,” one of Cartoon Network’s most beloved animated shows. It ran for four seasons from 2001 to 2004, but the storyline never concluded. Samurai Jack has since become a cult classic in the animation world. And after much demand, the creators have revived it for Season Five.

We’re joined by Genndy Tartakovsky, the original creator; and Scott Wills, Art Director for the series.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In recent years, many newspapers and magazines have abandoned their print publications for an all digital format. From the Christian Science Monitor, to Newsweek, to Jet Magazine. One Decatur-based magazine is moving from digital back to print.

Elaine Read and Matt Weyandt

All this year, in our series Georgia Eats, we explore the South’s relationship with food. We’ve talked about the state’s craft beer industry. Turns out there’s also a craft chocolate movement, and it’s taken some Georgia chocolatiers far beyond the state’s borders.

Eric Norris / flickr

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month to tighten regulation of methadone clinics. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia has more than 70 clinics, the most in the South. We talked about this with Neil Campbell, who oversees the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse.

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month that would tighten methadone clinic regulations. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia leads the South in terms of methadone clinics; we have 71 in comparison to Tennessee's 14 and South Carolina's 20. So why do we outnumber our neighbors when it comes to methadone clinics? Neil Campbell, executive director of the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse, will weigh in on this phenomenon with help from Catoosa County Sheriff, Gary Sisk.

uillaume Ziccarelli / Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art.

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art. Daniel Arsham joins us to talk about the new exhibition.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Soumaya Khalifa of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, environmental blogger Ken Edelstein, and Republican strategist Julianne Thompson.

    BREAKROOM TOPICS:

PBS

Tony Award-winning actor Alan Cumming loves the musical “Cabaret.” He starred in a performance in London’s West End, and he’s played the smarmy emcee twice on Broadway. He’s on tour now, not with the musical "Cabaret" but with an actual cabaret: “Alan Cumming Sings Sappy Songs.” "On Second Thought" guest host Adam Ragusea talked with him ahead of his performance Friday at 8pm at Atlanta Symphony Hall.

New research from the University Of Georgia links poverty to stifled brain development in children. The study also shows how those negative effects of poverty can be curbed by programs which implement positive parenting and improved family relationships. Lead researcher Gene Brody is with us to talk about the findings, and Washington University professor Deanna Barch also joins us to talk about implications of the study.

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech is creating what it calls the most environmentally friendly building in the Southeast. It collects its own water and solar power, and uses them to satisfy energy needs and irrigate nearby vegetation.

This "living building" is on track to break ground later this year. We get a preview of this new structure from Howard Wertheimer, the school’s assistant vice president for capital planning and space management.

Georgia Southern University

There is change in the works at two Georgia universities. Earlier this year, the University System Board of Regents voted to merge Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new school will keep Georgia Southern’s name. Since 2011, the university system has completed seven mergers, in the interests of efficiency and economy.

danielfoster437 / Foter

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time.

We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time. We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

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