On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

American College of Radiology / National Cancer Institute

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South.  But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society.

DC Pest Controll

Savannah attracts a whole lot of tourists. And, if you believe pest control experts at Terminix, an over-supply of rats. Terminix recently named Savannah the most rodent-infested city in America, overtaking Atlanta, which has seen its fair share of rodent woes. When Atlanta was still tops for rats, we invited Jason Chapman, vice-president of sales at Peachtree Pest Control to talk about why the city found itself home to so many rodents.

Tase and Tell

An exhibit at the University of Georgia highlights items from the state’s gold rush. Wright State Environmental History Professor Drew Swanson calls the era an ugly chapter of Georgia’s past, rife with environmental damage in the North Georgia mountains, and a driver of the forced eviction of Cherokee people. Drew Swanson joins us to talk about gold’s lasting legacy

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Foter

The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

Takénobu

Atlanta cellist Nick Ogawa, better known as "Takénobu," takes the cello beyond the orchestra. His latest album, “Reversal,” uses loops and percussive sounds to create thick soundscapes. We catch up with Takénobu ahead of a performance at Eddie’s Attic in Decatur this Sunday, November 19. 

UNODC / http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/statistics/data.html

As a nation, we’re having more tough conversations about sexual violence and harassment, as more women step forward to accuse powerful men of abusing their positions. We have profiles for killers and terrorists, what about people who commit sexual assault and rape?

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

Flickr

Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

Wikimedia Commons

Finding your true calling can take years, even decades. Children’s book author Christopher Paul Curtis found his calling in his 40s. After spending more than a decade working at a Detroit car factory, he began writing young adult fiction about the African-American experience. He was the first American man to win the Newbery Medal literary prize. 

R.E.M.

R.E.M.’s hit record “Automatic for the People” was released 25 years ago. In 1992, the album hit #2 on the Billboard 200 charts, and became certified 4x platinum in the United States. The record is getting an anniversary re-release, out tomorrow, November 10. We talk with Athens’ own Mike Mills, R.E.M.’s bass player.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of R.E.M.'s iconic album, "Automatic for the People." We asked R.E.M mega-fan and Athens-based music reviewer Jordan Stepp to share an appreciation of the album. She talked about two of her favorite tracks: "Drive" and "Sweetness Follows." 

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

jufchicago / flickr

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in "That '70s Show," "Fargo," "Bob’s Burgers," and, of course, "Law and Order." However, he may be best known for his stand up specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." Gaffigan is in Atlanta this weekend for a live show. He told us there is an argument for comedians not to talk about the news.

 

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Veterans Day is this weekend. We meet a veteran named Bradley Field, who works in the film industry. Among his credits: "Detroit," "Suicide Squad," and "Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice." On Second Thought regular Kalena Boller caught up with Bradley just after production wrapped in Atlanta on "Den of Thieves," which is out next year.

The Athens music scene is legendary and always booming. Since it became famous for launching bands like R.E.M., the B-52s, and countless others, it has only grown in the number of bands, talent, and musical quality. Some Athenians are documenting the music and history of that town's scene. 

Ryan Basden

This spring, voter data was compromised at an election center at Kennesaw State University. State voters filed a lawsuit this summer, alleging the state could have prevented the suspected hacking. Shortly after, Georgia officials wiped the election data. Now state lawmakers are looking for answers.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. In Atlanta’s mayoral race, two women advanced to a runoff election. Elsewhere in the state, Democrats picked up two house seats in northeast Georgia and flipped a senate seat long held by the GOP. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Paul Sherman

A lot of people collect things, and in Paul Sherman’s family, that thing is campaign memorabilia. Paul’s new book is called “Look Away: Documenting Crude and Sexist Items From the Trump Campaign Trail.” It includes several pictures from rallies in Georgia. We recently caught up with three members of the Sherman family.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

HISTORIC DESOTO THEATRE FOUNDATION

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talked with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

 

  

Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

In 1983 a black man named Timothy Coggins was found murdered, in Spalding County, Georgia. He had been stabbed and mutilated to the point of disfigurement. No arrests were made until now. We get an update on this cold case from Fred Wimberly of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Nelson Helm.

HBO

This weekend, the popular HBO show "Vice Principals" ends after two seasons. The show revolves around a high school vice principal named Neal Gamby, who is played by Statesboro, Georgia native Danny McBride. He’s also a co-creator of the series. McBride joined us to talk about the show’s success and filming in the South.

Reza Aslan

A new book by religious scholar Reza Aslan challenges some very old ideas about religion, and how we describe a higher power. The book is “God: A Human History.” It hits shelves this week, and Reza appears in Atlanta this Saturday as part of the Marcus Jewish Community Center’s Book Festival. He joined us live. 

Wikimedia

Republicans have long dominated Southern politics. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect, Randall Woodfin, who beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham. 

Kellie Walsh

Though bioengineered humans like the ones in “Blade Runner” seem like science fiction now, we’re advancing closer and closer to that reality. A new book called “Body Builders: Inside the Science of the Engineered Human,” looks at how scientists are learning to create bionic human body parts.

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