On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Maura Currie / GPB News

The Breakroom has reassembled to break down the week’s news... in a room. They talked about Valentine’s Day, Justin Timberlake, and that controversial Martin Luther King Jr. Super Bowl commercial. And they discussed the Larry Nassar scandal, Atlanta’s terrible traffic, and whether the Game of Thrones creators can pull off a new Star Wars series.

Georgia could make it more difficult for underage girls to get an abortion. Legislation filed in the Georgia state Senate would require underage girls to justify why they should be allowed to avoid notifying a parent or guardian if they are getting an abortion. At the federal level, President Trump has vowed to see the Roe v. Wade decision overturned. We move away from the political side the abortion debate, and focus on the science. For that, we talked with Didi Saint Louis, an Atlanta-based physician for reproductive health.

Dave Gonzalez / Geek.com

Some things in life are just so bad, they’re good. Imagine being marooned in a movie theater, forced to watch the worst movies of all time… for all time. That’s the premise behind the show, Mystery Science Theater 3000. It features a human and his two robot sidekicks, on a spaceship, riffing on the movies they love to hate. Two of the stars of the cult classic are coming to Atlanta to hate on bad movies in front of a live audience.

Reid Williams / GPB News

In the last year, Hollywood has been rocked by scandal. Some of the most powerful figures in the industry were accused of sexual misconduct. There’s an initiative in Georgia called Safety Shot that’s trying to address sexual abuse within the state’s film industry. We talked with two of Safety Shot’s founders: filmmaker Suzan Satterfield and actress Laura Lundy.

 Interview Highlights

Daniel Mayer / Wikimedia Commons

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has seen plenty of turmoil over the past week -- Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned over financial conflicts of interest, and impending budget cuts are forcing the agency to drastically cut its overseas programs. What does all of this mean for the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked first with Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the CDC. He’s now the President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives, a global health initiative of Vital Strategies. Later in the show we were joined by Andy Miller, editor and CEO of Georgia Health News.

A week ago, Brenda Fitzgerald resigned as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The revelation she holds financial stakes in a tobacco company -- and thus has a major conflict of interest -- comes as the CDC faces enormous budget cuts. The agency is preparing to downsize its global epidemic prevention programs by about 80 percent. Should we be worried about the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked with former CDC director Tom Frieden and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.

Steve Helber / The Associated Press

The Southern Poverty Law Center says there were two major spikes in the twentieth century for when Confederate memorials and symbols were dedicated: during the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights Movement. Elizabeth Herbin-Triant

Wikimedia Commons

Across the South, you find Confederate monument relics: often outside a courthouse, or in a cemetery. One monument was vandalized the end of last year at historic Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Georgia. The statue featured a Confederate soldier holding a rifle. Cemetery staff found the soldier's face smashed, and his hands missing.

Kintpuash / Wikimedia Commons

When we talk about what to do with Confederate monuments, there are usually two ends of the spectrum: those who want to remove them entirely and those who want to leave untouched. Adding more historical context to monuments might provide a middle ground, but what would that look like, and would it even solve the problem? Andra Gillespie and Celeste Headlee discussed other states’ attempts to contextualize with Anne Marshall, assistant history professor at Mississippi State University. We also heard from Dan Moore, founder of the African American Panoramic Experience Museum in Atlanta.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

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