On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Jordan Strauss Invision / The Associated Press

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Tony Harris to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes farmer Jon Jackson, Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, and Nsenga Burton, who chairs Mass Media Arts at Clark Atlanta University. 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

DonTaé Hodge

Hurricane Irma wreaked havoc on the Southeast. It was even more destructive on the Virgin Islands, where it hit as a Category 5 storm. Nearly every building was damaged, and many were completely destroyed. As Irma approached, DonTaé Hodge of Atlanta was anxiously following updates. Hodge grew up in the British Virgin Islands, and told us what it was like to be so far from home at a critical time.

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

Is Atlanta at risk of overcrowding? Last month, The Atlanta Regional Commission reported nearly 80,000 new people in the metro region since just last year -- the highest growth rate since the Great Recession. How this will affect more than your commute, like your rent, and your space to walk down the street, has yet to be seen. We talk with Mike Carnathan, a researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission, and Chris Leinberger, a business professor at George Washington University.

Gene Blythe / AP Photo

In the last year, nearly 80,000 people moved to the Atlanta metro area. The city is growing at its fastest rate since the Great Recession. But can the city meet its needs and maintain its desirable status? We talk about this with Mike Carnathan, a Researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission.

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talked with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Christopher Kimball is one the biggest names in cooking. Best known as the longtime host of the popular TV and radio show, “America’s Test Kitchen,” he also published the magazine “Cook’s Illustrated.” Last year, he launched a new project called “Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street.” The Boston-based venture teaches cooking, publishes a magazine, and produces a TV show.

Jeff Roberson / AP Photo

The rate of Americans with epilepsy is continuing to rise, based on new data from The Centers For Disease Control And Prevention. The data is the first report to get complete epilepsy numbers from every state. It finds more than 3.4 million adults and children now have epilepsy. We talk about this issue with Rosemarie Kobau, a Health Scientist with the CDC. And Joseph Sirven, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and Editor at Epilepsy.com.  

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talk with Atlanta-Journal Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

Courtesy of Theatre Macon

Theatre Macon has fostered talent in Middle Georgia for over three decades. Founding Artistic Director Jim Crisp has been with the theater since its inception 32 years ago. He announced this summer he would retire at the end of the upcoming season. We talk with Crisp about the legacy of the theater in Macon, and his work on hundreds of stage productions. 

Learning From Life's Failures

Sep 19, 2017
Patch.com

Failure is a fact of life. We’ve all been there: whether it’s as simple as tripping over your own feet, or as serious as dealing with a divorce. Atlanta author Amy Lyle wants to share, so people can laugh at -- and learn from -- her own life’s failings.

FX Networks

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant-Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

Wikimedia Commons

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

Nicole Abalde / flickr

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A new book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book, Cook & Tell. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

 

The Breakroom returns to discuss the week’s news, including the success of the horror film “IT” and Harvard admissions. We’ll also talk about Amazon’s new HQ, and the Equifax hack. Joining us in the Breakroom are Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest. Stephen Brown, and Christian Zsilavetz.

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

The B-52s made it big. And the iconic band from Athens takes the stage in their home state tonight, Sept. 15, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall. We revisit an interview with founding member Kate Pierson.

Hurricane Irma put a lot of lives on hold. But for Jacob Gmitter of Lakeland, Florida, there was one thing that just couldn’t wait. GPB reporter Grant Blankenship brings us the story of a young saxophonist on the road.

Commentary: Climate Change Missing From Storm Coverage

Sep 15, 2017

The constant media coverage of Hurricane Irma kept people up to speed on the storm’s intensity and the damage it caused. But journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News says there was one thing most of the coverage was missing

the artist

The B-52s have been a major part of Georgia’s music scene since the 1970s, when it formed in Athens.

Hans Canosa

As recent events bear witness, women still fight daily for respect in a world dominated by white men. Few point to that struggle as well as author Gabrielle Zevin, whose bestselling novel "The Storied Life of AJ Fikry" characterized affirmation and love in the modern world. Her latest novel, "Young Jane Young," tackles misogyny and slut-shaming. We talk with Gabrielle Zevin ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House tonight at 7 p.m.

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

The number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the many suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

Author and founder of the Decatur Book Festival, Daren Wang has a new book. "The Hidden Light of Northern Fires" offers a fresh take on the American Civil War. It was released earlier this month. He joined us in the studio to talk about his first novel.

Mystery Science Theater 3000, Me Too, The Breakroom

Animal shelters in Georgia are at capacity. As millions fled the storms this week, many pet owners left their furry friends in shelters across the state. We talk about how shelters are accommodating the overcrowding with Tracey Belew, Shelter Manager for the Macon-Bibb County Animal Welfare Department.

As Hurricane Irma hit Georgia, hundreds of evacuated horses, goats and cows sheltered at the Georgia National Fairgrounds south of Macon. GPB's Emily Cureton brings us an audio postcard.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

Last week, the Trump administration announced plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. This program grants legal protections to people who entered the United States illegally as children. The decision left roughly 800,000 people who rely on the program in a legal limbo. People like Valentina Emilia Garcia Gonzalez.

Wilfredo Lee / AP Photo

Animal shelters in Georgia are at capacity. As millions fled the storms this week, many pet owners left their furry friends in shelters across the state. We talk about how shelters are accommodating the overcrowding with Tracey Belew, Shelter Manager for the Macon-Bibb County Animal Welfare Department.

Hurricane Irma has made landfall, and is working its way up our state. The remnants of Irma were downgraded to a tropical storm, but that storm remains a major threat. We checked in with National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Nadler and GPB reporter Emily Jones.

Author Greg Iles has sold millions of books. He’s written 15 novels, 12 of which have been New York Times best sellers. His latest novel is “Mississippi Blood” -- the final installment of a trilogy that he began eight years ago. We revisited our conversation with Greg Iles from back in March.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Georgia has welcomed thousands of people fleeing Hurricane Irma. After Hurricane Katrina, our doors were also wide open to evacuees, like the Rev. E. Leroy Brown. He had been preaching in New Orleans for nearly 20 years, when he moved to Dallas, Georgia. He shared his story of relocating after the powerful storm.

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