On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

A lawsuit filed this month claims Georgia’s system for drawing voting districts purposefully excludes black voters. This brings redistricting, also known as gerrymandering, back into the news. The dictionary definition of gerrymander hardly explains what it really is and a lot of people don’t really understand the incredible impact it has on the nation. So, we'll break it down with Kennesaw State University professor of Political Science, Kerwin Swint

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Shaky Knees Music Festival begins this weekend in Atlanta. All week, we’ve heard from artists on the festival’s line-up. We top off the series with a very distinct Southern voice: Tennessee-based singer and multi-instrumentalist Amythyst Kiah. She performs at the festival on Saturday at 12:15 p.m.

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

The stocks of the two biggest private prison companies in the nation saw a big boost shortly after President Trump took office. One of those companies is the GEO Group, which currently operates detention facilities in Georgia.

Penguin Random House

Heck, everyone loves tacos -- or so says the new children’s book, “Dragons Love Tacos Two.” In this sequel, the unthinkable occurs: every taco in the world disappears. And it’s up to dragons -- the biggest taco fans -- to remedy this catastrophe and save the tacos. We hear from the duo behind the book series: writer Adam Rubin and illustrator Daniel Salmieri.

Growing Up Asian-American In The South

May 10, 2017
Matthew Hashiguchi

Asian-Americans are America’s fastest growing ethnic group. Many Asians and Pacific Islanders are settling in Georgia. But in filmmaker Matthew Hashiguchi’s experience, people don't always welcome them to the South. We talked with him about his documentary, "Good Luck Soup," which is airing on ​GPB’s Knowledge channel Sunday, May 14 at 5 p.m.

Where Are The Retail Stores Going?

May 10, 2017
Mike Dunn / flickr

Retail stores are disappearing, but the economy is not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We talked about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Atlanta Business Chronicle reporter Amy Wenk and Georgia Southern University professor John Brown.

Flickr / weaverphoto

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal has signed the campus carry law. Starting July 1, anyone with a weapons license can carry a concealed gun on a state school’s campus. The Chief of Police for Valdosta, home of Valdosta State University, says this is bad news for public safety. Here’s Chief Brian Childress, in his own words.

Riverdale Avenue Books

If romance novels aren’t appealing to you, try adding some Southern love and death. That’s the premise behind the new romance anthology, “Gone with the Dead.” It’s inspired by two Atlanta classics: “Gone with the Wind” and “The Walking Dead.” We talked with the anthology's editor Lori Perkins, who is the founder of Riverdale Avenue Books.

Marion Fregeac

Fantastic Negrito is best known to the world as the first-ever winner of NPR Music's Tiny Desk Contest. But the blues musician has been working for years to get wide recognition. The next step will be a performance at the Shaky Knees Festival in Atlanta this Saturday. We talk with Fantastic Negrito about his rise from the ground up.

TIDAL

Beyoncé’s "Lemonade" album took the nation by storm last year. The album sparked a massive conversation about race issues in this country and last month "Lemonade" was recognized with a Peabody Award from the University of Georgia.

Morton Theatre

In honor of National Historic Preservation Month, we are visiting historic theaters across the state. Our first visit takes us to the Morton Theatre in Athens. It opened in 1910, and it's one of the oldest surviving African-American built, owned, and operated vaudeville theaters in the United States. Theater director Lynn Green shares her memories of the Morton Theatre.

Photo Courtesy Of Ron Gallo

Ron Gallo doesn't care if you like him. The Nashville musician has bigger things to worry about, such as the absurdity of human nature and the question of greater purpose in the universe. He channels those thoughts with quick, punky energy on-stage. Ron will bring his philosophically driven jams to the Shaky Knees Festival this Sunday, so we caught up with him in the studio.

MarkCiz / flickr

Do you get enough sleep? A good night’s rest can depend on lot of things: your dinner, your kids, where you live, and even your race. A new book by Emory University professor Ben Reiss explores how we got so sleep-obsessed, yet sleep-deprived.

When you think of bullies, you might think of kids at school. But bullying doesn’t stop with school. A recent study shows women and minorities are most likely to be targeted in the workplace. We spoke with study authors Brandon Attell from the Health Policy Center at Georgia State University and Linda Treiber, a professor of Sociology at Kennesaw State University.

 

leebyrne68 / flickr

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola recently announced it would lay-off 1,200 workers. This comes after similar downturns in recent years.

Josh Telles

Korean-American indie rock band Run River North will perform at the Shaky Knees Festival in Atlanta this weekend. The band is currently touring to promote their latest album, "Drinking From A Salt Pond." We catch up with lead vocalist Alex Hwang and guitarist Daniel Chae ahead of their Shaky Knees show this Saturday.

Whitney Chirdon / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Steve Brown of the Fayette County Board of Commissioners, Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, Georgia State University professor Eric Segall, and Kennesaw State University professor Roxanne Donovan.

We talk with singer and songwriter Rhiannon Giddens, who is best known as the lead vocalist with the string band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops. She’s got a new solo album, "Freedom Highway." It tells the stories of oppressed African Americans. We talked with her ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, May 6 at 8 p.m.

Georgia's Bad Credit Score

May 4, 2017

Thinking of getting a new credit card or buying a house? Your credit score can determine those things, and a whole lot more. A new report puts Georgia at the top of the list for worst credit in the country.  That’s according to the website, cardratings.com. Georgia’s lousy rating is the result of low credit scores, foreclosures, unemployment and bankruptcy.

Photo Courtesy of Anna Vocino

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too.

Malingering / Flickr

A recent article from The New Yorker magazine called barbecue the most political food in America. The author argues barbecue has its roots in racism and discrimination. We discuss this history with Chuck Reece, editor of the Bitter Southerner. Also joining us are food writers Michael Twitty, and Kathleen Purvis of the Charlotte Observer.

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too. We talk to her ahead of a book signing this Saturday, May 6.

A class at Georgia Tech focuses on the history and community of Auburn Avenue in Atlanta. The neighborhood was home to Martin Luther King Jr. and an important setting for the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Now, Georgia Tech students are documenting that community, while trying to raise awareness of issues there. We speak with Professor Nassim JafariNaimi, and students Nick Tippens and Ali Yildirim.

anoldent / Foter

A group of private landowners wants to develop 1,000 acres on Georgia’s Cumberland Island. Opponents say the rezoning would negatively impact wildlife and tourism.

Georgia’s system for deciding parole just changed for the first time in a decade. Last month, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles approved new guidelines for determining if inmates should get out of prison early. One of the changes is, a person’s prior arrest history, rather than just their conviction history, can color that decision. Adam Gelb is director of the Public Safety Performance Project with the Pew Charitable Trusts. Also joining us is Marissa McCall Dodson. She’s the public policy director with the Southern Center for Human Rights.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Georgia’s system for deciding parole just changed for the first time in a decade. Last month, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles approved new guidelines for determining if inmates should get out of prison early. One of the changes includes a person’s prior arrest history, rather than just their conviction history.

PremierofAlberta / Foter

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Charles McNair

Once upon a time, magazines published novels one chapter at a time. Now author Charles McNair is bringing the novel back to bite-sized form in the Atlanta-based magazine, The Bitter Southerner. Each week, he releases another chapter of “The Epicureans.” We asked Charles to take a break from writing and tell us about his creative process.

GPB

New research from the Southern Poverty Law Center and Emory University finds cases of alleged bias in the Atlanta Immigration Court. The AIC denies asylum to 98 percent of seekers, by far the highest rate of any immigration court in the nation.

Jason Thrasher

Athens Photographer Jason Thrasher has been shooting the music scene there for decades. His new book “Athens Potluck” captures the early gigs of R.E.M., Pylon, and the Drive-By Truckers. Thrasher adds two more tunes to our essential Georgia Playlist.

Pages