On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Keith Hadley/AJC Staff / Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult?

Johnny Edwards / Jredwards@ajc.com / Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Last summer, hundreds gathered in downtown Augusta to protest against a confederate statue there. The NAACP also issued a statement that calls for its removal. But some say it should stay up. One of them is Steve Oney, former Georgian and author of the book "And the Dead Shall Rise: the Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank." Oney offers us a commentary.

Trevor Young / GPB

We’ve spent a lot of time talking about Georgia’s Confederate memorials. Now we visit one. In Athens, you almost certainly run into the obelisk downtown memorializing confederate soldiers. It sits right on Broad Street, just feet away from UGA’s famous arches. Producer Trevor Young asks Athenians how they feel about the monument in an audio postcard.

 

 

Noir stories are dark, sometimes scary, and in a new anthology, also distinctly Southern. Tayari Jones is the editor and co-author of “Atlanta Noir.” She joined the Georgia Authors Hall of Fame this year, and we spoke with her back in August.

 

Shealah Craighead

The Breakroom gang joined guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Georgia State University law professor Tanya Washington, children's book author Mike Lowery, and Jessica Walden of Rock Candy Tours in Macon.

 

The Tide Pod Challenge has sent dozens of people, many of them young teens, to hospitals across the country. Eating laundry detergent may seem like a new level of stupidity, but kids and adolescents have been doing dumb things to impress each other for a long time. And, despite first appearances, there might actually be good reasons why. Joining us to talk through this are Catherine O’Neal, Assistant Research Scientist at UGA’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and Jay Hathaway, Senior Writer at the Daily Dot.

February is Black History Month. Canada, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands also have months to commemorate black achievements. Host Celeste Headlee opens the Gripe Bag and talks about why a month doesn’t cut it.

 

 

HEADLEE: "Black History Month was the brainchild of eminent historian Carter Woodson. Woodson had a doctorate from Harvard in the 1920s, which is pretty amazing history, if you ask me.

 

Mike Mozart / Flickr

The Tide Pod Challenge has sent dozens of people, many of them young teens, to hospitals across the country. Eating laundry detergent may seem like a new level of stupidity, but kids and adolescents have been doing dumb things to impress each other for a long time. And, despite first appearances, there might actually be a good reason why. Joining us to talk through this are Catherine O’Neal, Assistant Research Scientist at UGA’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and Jay Hathaway, Senior Writer at the Daily Dot.

Saying Goodbye To An ATL Neighborhood Favorite

Feb 1, 2018
Courtesy of Tori Allen

A restaurant can be more than a place to eat. It can also be a hub for friendship and family. That’s how many people feel about Cowtippers. This midtown Atlanta establishment has been a force in the city’s LGBT scene for the last two decades. But earlier this month, Cowtippers announced the end of an era. It plans to close February 18. GPB intern Emily Bunker visited for a lunchtime drag show-- “The Heifer Review,” and she sent back this audio postcard.

This is the first year Atlanta has a police officer dedicated to handling cases of animal cruelty. The position was created at the end of 2017 by the city’s police Chief Erika Shields. The first officer to fill the post is Patrol Officer Amy Soeldner, a 22-year veteran of the force. We talk to Soeldner about solving and preventing crimes of cruelty to animals.

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