On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Allyssa Lewis Talks About Her Animated Life

May 24, 2018
La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Fans of anime, gaming and comics: Prepare to geek out at this year’s Momocon in Atlanta.

 

It’s one of the fastest growing all-ages conventions in the country, with more than 90,000 visitors expected this year.

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats. This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America." It addresses how people confronted him after the publication of his op-ed, and how to proceed from there. In his book, he asks white Americans to rise above their initial racial response and have empathy for the African-American community. George Yancy joined us in studio to talk about "Backlash."

Matthew Sweet Returns To Georgia

May 23, 2018
Courtesy Matthew Sweet

Singer and songwriter Matthew Sweet got his start in the Athens, Georgia, music scene in the 1980s. His star rose in the 90s with hits like 100% Fun, Altered Beast and Blue Sky on Mars. Sweet’s drive to creative music hasn’t slowed down.

Courtesy Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats.

This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America."

© European Union 2016 / European Parliament

Syria is suffering its worst humanitarian crisis in years.

 

The United Nations estimates some 5.6 million Syrians have fled their country in search of a safer place to live. President Trump capped the number of refugees allowed in the United States last year. The U.S. admitted close to 28,000 refugees in 2017, a dramatic reduction from 93,000 people allowed in the year before.

 

Khawla al-Abdullah arrived in Atlanta two years ago. She's originally from Aleppo, Syria.

Some Georgia law schools want to appeal to more than their traditional law school students. In the fall, the University of Georgia begins offering a graduate degree program for non-lawyers. As schools broaden the appeal of the law, there is major concern about Georgia’s lawyer shortage, particularly in rural areas. We have seen a number of companies form that offer online legal services, but are these viable alternatives?

The Bitter Southerner Summer Reading Roundup

May 22, 2018
Graphic by Bitter Southerner

If you are an avid reader, we have some suggestions for you.

The Bitter Southerner just released its 2018 "Summer Reading Roundup," a list of the year's best Southern books.

 


The United States Department of Justice estimates nearly two-thirds of all jail inmates have mental health problems. In Georgia, a new investigation raises serious questions about the quality of care those inmates receive.Over the last decade, 1 in 6 of more than 500 deaths in Georgia jails has involved inmates who showed signs of mental illness, the Georgia News Lab, WSB-TV and Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigation has found. We spoke with Georgia News Lab reporters Christina Maxouris and Harrison Young to find out more. The AJC's Brad Schrade also joined.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Atlanta is known as the “city in a forest." More than 1/3 of the city is covered in trees, standing well above most American cities

But as Atlanta experiences a development boom, the green canopy is shrinking. Private property is the main factor behind this destruction. 

Family of Henry "Peg" Gilbert

In 1947 in Harris County, Georgia, an African-American man named Henry “Peg” Gilbert was arrested and jailed, without legal cause.

Five days later, a mob beat him to death in his jail cell. He was a deacon at Union Springs Baptist Church as well as a respected landowner. He was arrested by the county’s sheriff on suspicions of Gilbert hiding a fugitive. There was never a trial or conviction. 

meltwater / Flickr

The United States Department of Justice estimates nearly two-thirds of all jail inmates have mental health problems.

 

In Georgia, a new investigation raises serious questions about the quality of care those inmates receive.

It's been 100 years since a Spanish influenza epidemic killed as many as 50 million people worldwide, including 675,000 Americans. A new book on the deadly pandemic is out this week. It's called “More Deadly Than War.” The author, Kenneth C. Davis, talked with us about how the Spanish flu affected the course of World War I.

Still from YouTube / GPB

Just as we do at the end of every week, this Friday we brought together a group of four smart people to help us break down the week's news. On Second Thought host Adam Ragusea sat down with our Breakroom panel — Soumaya Khalifa, Greg Williams, Natalie Pawelski and Nemr — to put a rest to the Laurel vs. Yanny debate, process the royal wedding drama and analyze the antics of Georgia's GOP candidates for governor

Still from YouTube / GPB

Comedian Paula Poundstone is concerned she will have to whisper her act at the Miller Theater in Augusta Friday.

"Because of the golf," she told us in a hushed voice. 

Such a quiet routine would be a departure from Poundstone's typically boisterous commentary on NPR's weekly news quiz "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" She's been a panelist on the show more than 200 times, but told us she holds the "Wait Wait" record for losses. 

Courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine / Armed Forces Institute of Pathology

It's been 100 years since a Spanish influenza epidemic killed as many as 50 million people worldwide, including 675,000 Americans.

Brent Cobb Brings Georgia Home In Latest Album

May 17, 2018
Don Van Cleave/Courtesy of the artist

Country music artist Brent Cobb was born and raised in Georgia. Growing up, one of his favorite spots was Providence Canyon State Park in Southwest Georgia. It helped inspire his latest album called “Providence Canyon,” which was released last week. He gave us a preview of the album.

 

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

Devin Pedde

In 2016, Grammy-winning mandolinist Chris Thile was tasked with recreating one of public radio's most popular programs, as the second-ever host of "A Prairie Home Companion."

Now in its second season, the show has been recreated once over with a new title: "Live From Here." 

"It's a show title that really works for what we're doing, which is hopefully anything," Thile told us. "That's what gives me the biggest thrill ... sitting down in my little studio on Monday with a blank canvas." 

Dreadhead Films LLC / Screenshot by GPB

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

Atlanta’s Donald Glover has found a new level of success. He’s an actor, the creator of a hit show named after his hometown of Atlanta, and a rapper under the name Childish Gambino. But his most powerful statement might be “This Is America”, a new song and video released over the weekend. Freelance entertainment reporter Jewel Wicker gives us her take on the video and what role musicians should play when it comes to social issues.

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