On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9am

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays. 

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit us on Facebook.

Courtesy of March for Science Atlanta

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14.

Why do young people do stupid things? From the “condom snorting challenge” to the “tide pod challenge,” we looked at some of the dangerous trends popular among teenagers.

A group of neo-Nazis is planning a rally later this month in Newnan, Georgia. Some people in Newnan worry this rally could get violent, and there's a Change.org petition to urge the city not to allow the rally. Is it possible to reform extremists? GPB Special Correspondent Celeste Headlee spoke with two people who left their life of hate behind them.

Screenshot from YouTube

What is the quintessential Georgia song? Atlanta-based punk rock group The Coathangers adds their picks to our growing Georgia Playlist. 

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

Summer Evans / GPB

A few weeks ago, we talked about the shift in attendance of African Americans in evangelical churches.

The Pew Research Center finds only 10 percent of African Americans in Georgia identified as Evangelical Protestant in 2014. Nationwide, it’s even lower.

With fewer and fewer African-Americans attending evangelical churches, we asked two evangelical pastors about their efforts to make their congregation inclusive. 

GOOGLE IMAGES/PBS NEWSHOUR

Last month, Georgia Broadcast Hall of Famer Judy Woodruff was named sole anchor of PBS NewsHour.

Woodruff began her journalism career as a reporter in Atlanta. Since her early days in broadcast journalism, she has covered presidential campaigns and the White House. 

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years.

Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters.

At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. 

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a leader in South Africa's anti-apartheid movement and ex-wife of the late Nelson Mandela, died Monday. She was 81. On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen, who grew up in South Africa, spoke with host Adam Ragusea about Madikizela-Mandela's integral role in the fight against apartheid. Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe, CEO of the TutuDesk Campaign and daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, also joined from South Carolina. Tutu-Gxashe earned her master's degree from Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. 

Leighton Rowell / GPB

This week we talked about student debt, modern mass protest movements and Martin Luther King Jr.'s lasting legacy. We sat down with our Breakroom guests to process it all. 

We were joined in the studio by Georgia State University professors Tanya Washington and Héctor Fernández, Soumaya Khalifa, executive director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, and Leap Year founder and executive director Amber Scott. 

Courtesy of Matt Kennedy

Dorothy Steel might not have auditioned for the superhero movie "Black Panther" if her grandson hadn't told her what a game-changer the film would be for Hollywood and could be for her. 

But her grandson persuaded her to give it a go. She got the part. Now, millions have seen her advise T'Challa, Black Panther and king of Wakanda, as a merchant tribal elder. And she only started acting a few years ago. 

On Second Thought contributor Sonya Green spoke with the actress about her breakout role. 

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