Two Way Street

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Thursday at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m.

Two Way Street is an exciting new approach to exploring the issues, people and events that make Georgia a vibrant place to live, work and play. While most news broadcasts provide useful summaries of the day’s news, Two Way Street's mission is to give listeners a more complete perspective on the major issues facing the state, and to seek out engaging stories about the talents and achievements of the remarkable people who give our state its unique personality.

Ways to Connect

CAROLINE HAYE / PHASE:3

It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills has spent his career taking a close look at the Roman Catholic Church. But for all that thinking about religion, he had never read the Qur’an until recently. What he learned about Islam is the subject of his new book, “What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters,” and this episode of “Two Way Street.” 

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

St. Martin's Press

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

Daren Wang has made a career out of his love for literature. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival was his idea, and after 12 years as its executive director, he resigned this fall. Before that, he worked on public radio shows that celebrated literary luminaries. This August, Wang stepped into a new role: author. 

Emory University’s Center for Ethics is spending the next year continuing a conversation that Mary Shelley started nearly two centuries ago. Her debut novel, “Frankenstein,” will turn 200 on January 1, 2018. Emory is commemorating that milestone with an initiative it’s calling FACE: Frankenstein Anniversary Celebration and Emory.

Today on “Two Way Street,” Emily Saliers tells us about her first solo album, “Murmuration Nation.” 

Today on “Two Way Street,” we revisit our conversation with author George Saunders. He spoke with us in March about his first full-length novel “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which takes place during the first 24-hours after Willie Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln’s 11-year old son, dies.

Ken Burns

America is at a tense moment in history. We're living at a time of stark disagreement. Some say the president doesn't tell the truth; others say he tells it like it is. This tension came to head in Charlottesville, Virginia, where confrontations between white nationalists and counter-protesters erupted in violence. 

Raymond McCrea Jones

Today on “Two Way Street,” we talk to writer Steve Oney about his new book, “A Man’s World.” Oney has been writing for more than four decades for publications such as Esquire, Time, GQ, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Over the course of his career, he estimates that he’s written somewhere between 150 and 200 profiles, 20 of which are included in this new collection of essays.

Devin Pedde / Courtesy of APHC

Today on "Two Way Street," we talk with new "A Prairie Home Companion" host Chris Thile. Last October, Thile took over the APHC stage from Garrison Keillor, who hosted the show for over four decades. What is his relationship with Keillor like now? Thile tells us what kind of mentor Keillor has been.

Photo: Jason Thrasher

John T. Edge is the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance. Based out of the University of Mississippi, the SFA studies and documents Southern food cultures. A respected authority, Edge writes about Southern food and culture for publications such as Garden & Gun Magazine and The Oxford American.

Ayanna Howard

Robots are coming and sooner than you think. That’s according our guest this week on Two Way Street: Georgia Tech robotics expert, Ayanna Howard

Wikimedia Commons

Today on “Political Rewind,“ what comes next for the Plant Vogtle expansion? The $25 billion project has been in the works for years, but the builders – Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Toshiba – went bankrupt and future completion is questionable. Georgia Power customers have already paid additional fees for construction of the plant; what happens next? Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols joins us to discuss where we are and what it will take to move forward.

Hussein Malla / AP Photo

This week on “Two Way Street,” Lawrence Wright joined us in front of a live audience at the Atlanta History Center to discuss his new book, ”The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.”

Elena Seibert

This week on "Two Way Street," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo joins us to discuss his latest book, "Trajectory: Stories." 

Courtesy Jan Smith Studios

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we go behind the scenes of the recording business and talk to the Atlanta vocal trainer who has nurtured the careers of some of the biggest artists in popular music.

Langley / Public Domain

This week on “Two Way Street” we look at what’s being called the Great American Eclipse of 2017, with science writer David Baron.

Chris Savas Photography

Alan Alda’s acting career has spanned six decades, starting with an appearance on “The Phil Silvers Show,” an early network TV comedy hit, way back in 1953. In the years since, he’s appeared in countless television shows, including “The West Wing,” “ER,” “30 Rock” and many more. He’s been a star on Broadway and in dozens of feature films. But Alda is probably always going to be best remembered for his portrayal of Hawkeye Pierce, on the beloved television series “M*A*S*H.” The show ran for 11 seasons, and the finale, in 1983, broke the record for the most-watched TV series in history at the time - 125 million viewers.

PBS/CC

First up Alastair Bruce, historical advisor to “Downton Abbey” for five seasons. Bruce’s personal story is as interesting as any plot on the award-winning historical drama.

WHO

On September 9, 2014, a team of medical specialists guided Dr. Ian Crozier into the communicable disease isolation unit at Emory University Hospital. He had Ebola; in fact, he had the worst case of the disease that doctors in the United States had seen since the deadly Ebola epidemic began in Western Africa earlier that year.

GPB

Wonder how African-American women deal with issues like career advancement, body image stereotypes and white people using the n-word? Black women usually speak about these matters only among themselves.

We have a big anniversary coming up here on “Two Way Street.” On July 5, we’ll celebrate three years on the air. In that time we’ve talked with well over 100 guests – authors, performers, chefs, scientists, historians and others who have good stories to tell; because that’s what TWS is all about: storytelling.

Courtesy of markpendergrast.com

On this edition of “Two Way Street” our guest is author Mark Pendergrast. We’ll discuss his book “City on the Verge: Atlanta and the Fight for America’s Urban Future,” in which he documents the ongoing transformation of the city of Atlanta.

Courtesy of rupaul.com

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we profile three craftsmen who have living in Atlanta in common:

Kit Noble

If we wanted to make a list of the most notorious traitors in history, who would top the list? Probably Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus for 30 pieces of silver. But Benedict Arnold would be right up there with Judas. History has taught us that Arnold was the guy who sold out his fellow Americans by abandoning his duty as a general in the Continental Army and working with the British to defeat the colonists.

This week on “Two Way Street” we have Atlanta-based playwright and screenwriter Topher Payne.

Topher Payne got his start in theater because he had long arms and wasn’t afraid of heights. At least that’s the way he tells it.

There are few artists in the music business that have had the kind of career Bill Anderson has had. He wrote his first number one hit at age 19 while working as a disc jockey in Commerce, Georgia back in 1957; and since then he has placed 80 singles on the country music charts, 37 of them in the top ten. He’s been voted BMI Country Songwriter of the Year six times. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, and has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry for five decades.

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