Two Way Street

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Thursday at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m.

Two Way Street is an exciting new approach to exploring the issues, people and events that make Georgia a vibrant place to live, work and play. While most news broadcasts provide useful summaries of the day’s news, Two Way Street's mission is to give listeners a more complete perspective on the major issues facing the state, and to seek out engaging stories about the talents and achievements of the remarkable people who give our state its unique personality.

Ways to Connect

STUART ISETT / FORTUNE

July fifth 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of  "Two Way Street." To celebrate that milestone, we're revisiting one of our favorite conversations: an interview with Diana Nyad, the strong-willed swimmer who was the first to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. 

She completed the feat, which many thought was impossible, at the remarkable age of 66. 


GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Tom Johnson shares stories about his life and career in journalism.

We’re revisiting this conversation — and other favorites — as part of our “Two Way Street” anniversary celebration. To kick off our fifth year, we’re listening again to the shows that we can’t let go: the conversations that challenged us, surprised us and have stuck with us all these years. This show originally aired on January 14, 2017.


AP Photo

Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


David Spender/Flickr

Right now Muslims around the world are observing Ramadan, the holiest period on the Islamic calendar. What is Ramadan and what is the history behind it? What compels Muslims everywhere to devote themselves to an entire month of fasting and prayer?

Soumaya Khalifa, one of Georgia's most influential Muslim leaders, joins us to answer those questions and more. Khalifa is the Executive Director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta. 


JOAN MARCUS / HAMILTON BROADWAY

Today we're talking about one of the biggest sensations in the history of American theatre: "Hamilton: An American Musical." Composer, lyrisict, and preformer Lin-Manuel Miranda was inspired to create "Hamilton" after reading Ron Chernow's 800-page biography of Alexander Hamilton. 

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we sit down with four smart, well read Georgians to discuss their favorite books. This conversation picks up the discussion started by "The Great American Read," an eight-part PBS series that unpacks a diverse list of 100 books. "The Great American Read" premieres Tuesday May 22 at 8 PM on GPB. 

Sanford Myers / Invision/AP

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last October to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

Today on “Two Way Street” we’re discussing The New York Times obituary project “Overlooked” with its co-creator Jessica Bennett. From Ida B.

Bebeto Matthews / AP Photo

Author Tom Wolfe died at age 88 on May 14, 2018. This conversation was recorded in October 2017. 

On this edition of Two Way Street, we mark the 20th anniversary of the publication of Tom Wolfe’s smash best-seller “A Man in Full,” the long-awaited follow up to his novel “Bonfire of the Vanities.”

Ben Rose

On this edition of Two Way Street our guest is Shuler Hensley, the Tony-award winning Broadway actor who was born and raised in Marietta and still makes his home here. Shuler’s mother Iris was the founder of the Georgia Ballet. She encouraged her son from an early age to seek a career as a Broadway performer. And he did just that. 

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Bill talks to author Bruce Feiler, whose life’s work is to reinterpret ancient stories in a way that allows us to think more deeply about who we are today. Last year, he came to our studio to talk about his book, “The First Love Story: Adam, Eve, and Us,” which challenges the common narrative of Adam and Eve.

“Eve has been victim to the greatest character assassination the world has ever known,” Feiler tells us.

Craig Wetherby

On this week’s “Two Way Street,” Bill talks with Lamont “U-God” Hawkins, one of the founding members of legendary hip hop group, the Wu-Tang Clan. He and RZA, GZA, Method Man, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, Inspectah Deck, and Masta Killa put East Coast rap back on the map at a time when California rap was dominating the genre.

AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we're asking the question—who is Atticus Finch?

He was a beloved champion of justice in “To Kill a Mockingbird” but a bigot in “Go Set a Watchman.”

Matthew Murphy

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to Tony-award winning director, Kenny Leon, about his Broadway revival of the play, “Children of a Lesser God.”

Jim McGuire

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to the “royal family of roots music,”  Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn, about their new album, “Echo in the Valley.” This is their second collaboration, following the success of their self-titled debut, “Béla

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re diving into the extraordinary life of “Krazy Kat” cartoonist, George Herriman.“Krazy Kat,” which ran in American newspapers from 1913-1944, featured characters Krazy and Ignatz in the setting of Coconino County, Arizona.

On this “Two Way Street,” we’re talking about what dogs think and feel with a neuroscientist who has spent years studying them—Dr. Gregory Berns. His book, “What It’s Like to Be a Dog,” details his years of research on canine cognition.  

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth. Bernstein, a legendary composer, educator, and humanitarian, was born in August 25, 1918. To celebrate this milestone, orchestras and theatres around the world are preforming his vast range of work.

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