Two Way Street

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Thursday at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m.

Two Way Street is an exciting new approach to exploring the issues, people and events that make Georgia a vibrant place to live, work and play. While most news broadcasts provide useful summaries of the day’s news, Two Way Street's mission is to give listeners a more complete perspective on the major issues facing the state, and to seek out engaging stories about the talents and achievements of the remarkable people who give our state its unique personality.

Ways to Connect

On today’s show, we’re going to talk about something that’s completely free of charge but that many, many people might call the most valuable commodity in the world: sleep. It’s supposed to be a restful and restorative process. So why does it produce such anxiety?

Our guest today on “Two Way Street” is George Saunders. We’re going to talk about his new book “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which has been one of the most eagerly anticipated works of fiction in a long time.

Want to be in the audience to watch us tape Two Way Street? We'll be at the Carter Presidential Library Friday evening, March 17 at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Join us for our conversation about sleep with author Benjamin Reiss.

Ruth Schowalter

On today’s edition of “Two Way Street” we’re going to go underground. We’ll explore cool, dark, subterranean regions where thousands of species – from humans to reptiles to insects – have sought shelter and safety, in some cases for hundreds of millions of years, back to the earliest appearances of animal life on Earth.

On today’s “Two Way Street” we talk with Rodger Lyle Brown, the author of “Party Out of Bounds: The B-52s, R.E.M. and the Kids Who Rocked Athens, Georgia.” It’s the story of how Athens became the center of the rock and roll universe starting around 1980 and continuing for almost 20 years.

AP Photo

This years marks the 150th anniversary of the oldest Jewish congregation in Atlanta – the Temple, which was founded in 1867. The congregation was made up largely of well-to-do Atlantans – businessmen and their families who were well respected by many in the much larger Christian community.

On today’s show we talk to two singer-songwriters who are part of the rich community of musical artists who live and work in Nashville – one of the great music mecca’s of this country.

On today’s show we’re going to talk to historian and author Timothy Tyson. His new book, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” is an in-depth exploration of the horrific 1955 murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, the Chicago boy who traveled to Money, Mississippi to visit his mother’s family and who after a fateful chance encounter with a white woman in a general store was kidnapped and brutally murdered.

Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians

Our show today is devoted to looking at the work of one of Georgia’s literary giants: Carson McCullers. She was born in Columbus in 1917. Her father ran a jewelry store. Her mother’s chief occupation always seemed to be doting upon and caring for her sickly daughter Carson.

Ticonderoga Club

On today’s show we’re going to talk about food and cocktails. What more could you ask for than that? Our guests are three people in the Georgia food and beverage business who we’ve come to know and admire.

State museum of political history of Russia / Wikimedia Commons

It has been 100 years since Grigory Rasputin was murdered in Russia. And yet he continues to fascinate us. He was born a peasant in Siberia, found God, and made his way to the St. Petersburg palace of Tsar Nicholas and Tsarina Alexandra in 1905.

I’m really thrilled about this edition of “Two Way Street.” For some time, we’ve hoped to coax into our studio a man who became one of the important leaders of print and broadcast journalism in the 20th and early 21st centuries. We finally persuade Tom Johnson to join us and share stories about his life and career.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnapped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama. Bill introduces the story by describing the sad circumstances that led to Capote’s being taken in by distant relatives, and how his career as a writer unfolded from the time he was 11 years old. We hope you’ll listen with family!

In this week that marks the 75th anniversary of the devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, I talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Twomey. His new book “Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The 12 Days to the Attack” is an eye-opening look at the mistakes, misconceptions and miscommunications that prevented U.S. forces from recognizing that the American fleet harbored at Pearl Harbor would be the target of a massive Japanese attack.

On this week’s show we tell the fascinating story of how bluegrass music – born in the hills and hollers of the North Georgia mountains and Tennessee, and in rural communities in South Carolina and West Virginia more than 200 years ago – has crossed the Pacific Ocean and been enthusiastically embraced by a large fan base in Japan. Our guest is Denis Gainty, an associate professor of history at Georgia State University. He’s now researching and writing a book about Japanese bluegrass.

On today’s "Two Way Street" we present songs and stories about Thanksgiving and the upcoming holidays. Think of it as a playlist for the Thanksgiving weekend. Here are the songs we play on the show:

Caroline Haye / Phase:3

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we present our annual Thanksgiving cooking show. Every year we gather some of the finest chefs in the South in our studios to talk about their own Thanksgiving holiday memories, and to share with us recipes and tips for creating an outstanding holiday dinner. This year we have an exceptional group of chefs.

WORKMAN PUBLISHING

If I could say only one thing about my conversation with author Lee Smith for this edition of “Two Way Street” it would be this:

Listen to her voice.

Folger Shakespeare Library

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we devote our show to the Bard of Avon – William Shakespeare. There’s really never a bad time to talk about Shakespeare, but our show is pegged to the opening of the new exhibition “First Folio: The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare” at the William Carlos Museum at Emory University. The centerpiece is a book that is some 500 years old – a rare and precious First Folio of Shakespeare’s plays.  We talk with Emory University Shakespeare scholar Dr. Sheila Cavanagh, the co-director of the tour of the First Folio to all 50 states.

Remembering Studs Terkel

Oct 29, 2016

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we pay tribute to the legendary radio broadcaster and writer of oral histories, Studs Terkel. He was one of the great chroniclers of 20th century American life. He died eight years ago on October 30, 2008.

On this edition of the show we talk to the celebrated chef Asha Gomez. She grew up on the southern tip of India in Kerala, where the flavor profiles and foods they eat are dramatically different from the rest of the country. When Asha moved to Atlanta she began thinking of ways in which she could incorporate the recipes she’d brought with her from Kerala into the cooking she learned to love here in the American South.

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we talk with author and historical archivist Kaye Lanning Minchew about her new book “A President in our Midst: Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Georgia.”

We’re going to talk about families on this edition of “Two Way Street.” Most of us have them, and for better or worse, our families probably have had a greater influence on how we turned out than many other forces in our lives.

A con artist who plows into cars for pay while shaving her “bikini area.”

The star of Louisiana-based reality TV show “Bayou Brethren” who is actually an accordion player from Wisconsin.

A crooked businessman who steals sand from one beach to replace erosion on another.

On this edition of “Two Way Street” we talk to the great Atlanta-based blues guitarist Tinsley Ellis. Creative Loafing just named him blues artist of the year, and some time back, Rolling Stone magazine said of his hard-driving guitar style that his “eloquence dazzles…he achieves pyrotechnics that rival the early Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton.” High praise, indeed!

Courtesy Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library / UGA Libraries

Our first guest on this edition of “Two Way Street” is Jim Wagner. He’s just stepped down as president of Emory University, retiring after 13 years in that position. During his tenure at Emory, Wagner presided over a dramatic expansion of the school’s work in scientific research and public health, recruited prestigious world figures like Salman Rushdie and the Dalai Lama to join the Emory faculty and oversaw the largest increase in fundraising in the school’s history.

kennyleon.com

For Georgians who love theater, watching the career arc of Kenny Leon has been thrilling. He’s now a Tony Award-winning director with numerous Broadway and Off-Broadway productions to his credit.

During my tenure as editor in chief of Chicagoland Monthly, a regional magazine I ran in the late 1970s, we decided to do a cover story on how the Arab oil embargo was affecting the daily lives of people in metropolitan Chicago. Of all the covers we created for the magazine, I’m proudest of the one that hangs in my office at GPB. There’s Uncle Sam, dying for gasoline and committing suicide by self-immolation.

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