Two Way Street

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Thursday at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m.

Two Way Street is an exciting new approach to exploring the issues, people and events that make Georgia a vibrant place to live, work and play. While most news broadcasts provide useful summaries of the day’s news, Two Way Street's mission is to give listeners a more complete perspective on the major issues facing the state, and to seek out engaging stories about the talents and achievements of the remarkable people who give our state its unique personality.

Ways to Connect

Ann Marsden / The Splendid Table

Today on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to “The Splendid Table” host Lynne Rossetto Kasper ahead of her retirement. For more than two decades, Kasper has been unpacking the stories behind the food we eat for a weekly audience of about 725,000 listeners.

CAROLINE HAYE / PHASE:3

It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills has spent his career taking a close look at the Roman Catholic Church. But for all that thinking about religion, he had never read the Qur’an until recently. What he learned about Islam is the subject of his new book, “What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters,” and this episode of “Two Way Street.” 

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

St. Martin's Press

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

Daren Wang has made a career out of his love for literature. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival was his idea, and after 12 years as its executive director, he resigned this fall. Before that, he worked on public radio shows that celebrated literary luminaries. This August, Wang stepped into a new role: author. 

Emory University’s Center for Ethics is spending the next year continuing a conversation that Mary Shelley started nearly two centuries ago. Her debut novel, “Frankenstein,” will turn 200 on January 1, 2018. Emory is commemorating that milestone with an initiative it’s calling FACE: Frankenstein Anniversary Celebration and Emory.

Today on “Two Way Street,” Emily Saliers tells us about her first solo album, “Murmuration Nation.” 

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