Two Way Street

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Saturday at 4pm and Sunday at 11am

Two Way Street is an exciting new approach to exploring the issues, people and events that make Georgia a vibrant place to live, work and play. While most news broadcasts provide useful summaries of the day’s news, Two Way Street's mission is to give listeners a more complete perspective on the major issues facing the state, and to seek out engaging stories about the talents and achievements of the remarkable people who give our state its unique personality.

Ways to Connect

Dr. Randy Martin on Heart Health and Wellness

Feb 29, 2016

When I’m asked to describe in a few words what I think “Two Way Street” is all about, I always say it’s about really interesting people telling great stories about their lives, their work and the subjects that capture their attention. They might be authors or artists, scientists, chefs, community leaders or even funeral directors – if you didn’t listen to our show with Atlanta funeral director Willie Watkins, who shared a show with Scott Seeke, author of “Uncle Bush’s Live Funeral,” it may be worth checking out.

Harper Lee Remembered

Feb 19, 2016

As we were finishing production on this week’s show, the bulletin crossed the wires announcing the death of Harper Lee at age 89. She was a giant of American literature and one of the most important chroniclers of the evolution of the American South in the mid-twentieth century.

Author Stewart O'Nan on "West of Sunset"

Feb 13, 2016

I first read “The Great Gatsby” when I was in college. I have to admit, I was disappointed. It just didn’t seem to me at the time to be the Great American novel that so many think it is.

But I read it again about two years ago, when my daughter Emma was reading it in her high school lit class. It moved her deeply. She told me it was the best book she’d ever read. And so, I thought I should give F. Scott Fitzgerald another look. I can’t explain why I fell in love with Gatsby the second time around, but I did. I now realize what a great writer Fitzgerald really was.

'American Buffalo' and 'Sweeney Todd' in Atlanta

Jan 29, 2016

On this edition of Two Way Street, we talk with the directors and stars of two classics of American theater that are on stage in Atlanta now: First, director Freddie Ashley, and actors Deborah Bowman and Kevin Harry join us for a conversation about Stephen Sondheim’s dark, satiric masterpiece “Sweeney Todd; the Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” It’s playing now at Actor’s Express Theatre. For more information, go to their website. Then, we talk to director John Dillon and actor Neal Ghant about the production of David Mamet’s “American Buffalo.” Mamet wrote the show in the mid-1970s.

When I was a kid, local television stations showed old black and white movies back to back into the early morning hours on weekend nights. I saw some of my favorite pictures for the first time by staying up until 3 in the morning to watch; and one of the pictures I remember best was “They Died with their Boots On.” It starred Errol Flynn as George Armstrong Custer and Olivia DeHavilland as his wife Libbie. The movie portrayed Custer as a great hero of the West, a romantic figure with his long, flowing blond locks and his custom-made buckskin jackets.

George H.W. Bush Biographer Jon Meacham! Parts 1,2,3

Jan 16, 2016

I was really happy when we booked Jon Meacham for this week’s Two Way Street. His new biography of George H.W. Bush “Destiny and Power; the American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush” gives the most insightful view ever of a man who many Americans don’t think much about. Bush was at one point in his run for the presidency tagged as a wimp, and he never quite got out from under that disparaging label. He was often described as aloof, unfeeling and out of touch with regular Americans.

Journalist Mike Kelly and "The Bus on Jaffa Road"

Jan 9, 2016

We’re doing something new on Two Way Street this week: broadcasting a conversation that I led in front of a live audience at the Atlanta Jewish Book Festival recently. The guest is Mike Kelly. He’s a columnist and reporter for the Bergen Record in New Jersey; and he’s written a book called “The Bus on Jaffa Road,” which takes a deep dive into lives of terrorists and victims that intersected when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive vest on the No. 18 bus in Jerusalem in February, 1996. Among the victims were two young Americans, Sara Ducker and Matthew Eisenfeld.

Two reasons for many to be celebrating this weekend: It’s the start of a brand new year…and Downton Abbey kicks off its sixth season Sunday night on PBS television stations! OK, yes, this is the final season of Downton, and many devoted fans are already mourning the loss, but for the next two months, all of your favorites, from Carson to Lady Mary, the dowager countess and, of course the long-suffering Bates and his bride Anna will keep you company on Sunday nights.

Hamilton Jordan, His Life and Legacy!

Oct 10, 2015

I arrived in Georgia two years after Jimmy Carter left the White House, and so, never got to know the group known somewhat disparagingly by Washington insiders as “The Georgia Mafia” while they were in power. But I did become familiar with and a friend of a number of them in their post-Carter years.

An intimate portrait of civil rights icon Rosa Parks. The world knew her as the quiet but courageous activist who challenged Alabama’s Jim Crow laws by refusing to give up a seat on a Montgomery city bus to a white man. But Rosa Parks was also a loving wife and aunt to 13 children born to her brother Sylvester and his wife.

Harper Lee and Chuck Reece

Feb 21, 2015

    

A look at Southern culture – the good and the bad:

Readers everywhere are eager to see the new book by Harper Lee, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird. We talk with Melita Easters, the Atlanta writer who wrote a one-woman play about Harper Lee’s life who shares with us little-known stories about the gifted but reclusive author.

Love = Chocolate and Great Food!

Feb 14, 2015

Food and romance are inextricably linked, and so our Valentines weekend special features conversations with two stars of the Georgia food world.

Kristin Hard makes some of the finest chocolates anywhere. She knows the business from cultivating and fermenting the seeds of cacao trees to creating unique flavor profiles.

Ebola Ethics

Nov 8, 2014

Host Bill Nigut talks with Dr. Paul Wolpe, Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Wolpe is a bio-ethicist who looks at ethics in the practice of medicine. The conversation focuses on ethical and moral considerations surrounding the prevention and treatment of Ebola. For example, Zmapp, a potentially life-saving Ebola drug has been in such short supply a very limited number of patients can receive the drug. Who should get it? Who should not? What are the factors that weigh into that decision?

This special edition of Two Way Street is a broadcast of a conversation with global authorities discussing the ongoing threat of nuclear war. The program was sponsored by the Sam Nunn Institute of International Affairs at Georgia Tech and was taped in front of a live audience at Georgia Public Broadcasting last month. Bill Nigut was the moderator.

Bill Nigut hosts guests who tell stories of strong, courageous women in real life and in the world of fiction. First up is author and historian Karen Abbott.Her new non-fiction book "Liar, Soldier, Temptress, Spy" tells the story of four women who defied their gender-based roles to fight in the Civil War, one by posing as a man to fight as a solider, the others spying against the enemy.

This week, TWS focuses on two of Georgia's most dynamic entrepreneurs. Clark Howard and Jeff Hilimire.

A Conversation With Krista Bremer, Author Of My Accidental Jihad:

Atlanta's Power Financial Couple Jeff Sprecher & Kelly Loefler have become the highest profile married couple in Atlanta. He is the Atlanta businessman who made and won an audacious bid to buy the NY Stock Exchange. She works with him in the business but is also a principal owner of the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

Bull Durham and Factory Man

Sep 6, 2014

Bull Durham: From Film To Broadway-Bound Musical:
Released in 1988, Ron Shelton wrote and directed what many film organizations call one of the greatest sports movies, Bull Durham. He could have chosen any region of the country to tell his baseball story, but Shelton set the scene in the South. The reason, Shelton says, is because of his Southern roots.

Michael Shapiro – Director of the High Museum of Art. Shapiro has formed ground-breaking partnerships with some of the world’s most revered art institutions, including the Louvre. Before the partnership with the High Museum, the Louvre had never released works from its collection to any museum. 

 

 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

What Value Do You Put On The Work Of Low Wage Earners?

The fight over raising the minimum wage remains unresolved in Washington. But that debate, plus the fight over whether to allow those in this country illegally to seek jobs raises a deeper, more subtle question: what value do we put on the work of low-wage earners?

Ebola: Dispelling The Myths
With the arrival of Ebola patients Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol at Emory University Hospital, there is probably no city or state more aware of the fight to stop the spread of Ebola than here in Atlanta and Georgia.

Dr. Mark Rosenberg, President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health joins Bill Nigut to talk about the questions surrounding the Ebola virus.
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This year is the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Atlanta. The Cyclorama, the 128-year-old painting of the Civil War battle, is getting a new home.

In July, Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed and officials from the Atlanta History Center announced that the painting would move from its longtime home in Atlanta’s Grant Park to the History Center in Buckhead, where it will become the centerpiece of a multi-million dollar expansion and renovation.

 The Vision Behind Atlanta’s Center For Civil And Human Rights

Atlanta’s Center for Civil and Human Rights has been open for almost a month. The vision for the center began during the tenure of Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin.

One of the hardest working people behind the vision of the Center for Civil Rights was Doug Shipman, who started as pro-bono consultant on the project, but soon went on to work full time in the center's development
 

What’s Happening To The Honey Bees?

 

Jimmy Carter And The Evolution Of Evangelical Christianity

On July 15, 1976, Jimmy Carter strode to the podium at the Democratic national convention in Madison Square Garden in New York to accept the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.

In Atlanta's Core, The AIDS Epidemic Is Skyrocketing. Today, thanks to new medications, HIV infections and AIDS are no longer the death sentence they once were. That may be the reason AIDS has fallen out of the media spotlight. But that doesn’t mean the virus has gone away.

In Atlanta, HIV infection in some neighborhoods is skyrocketing, nearing the same level as some African nations.

The New York Stock Exchange And The Atlanta Dream: All In A Day’s Work For Jeff Sprecher And Kelly Loeffler

Kenny Leon is a Broadway and Hollywood director who makes his home in Atlanta. He won his first Tony award in June for directing a revival of "A Raisin In The Sun" starring Denzel Washington.

Now, Leon is appearing on stage in Atlanta in a production of Bernard Slade’s "Same Time Next Year" at True Colors, his theatre company in Atlanta. His co star is Phylicia Rashad, who created the iconic role of Claire Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”.

 

Bill Nigut debuts his new weekly radio program "Two Way Street with Bill Nigut" at 4 PM, Saturday, July 5 on 88.5, GPB Atlanta)

More than 40 years ago, I started my first job in broadcasting: hosting a one-hour daily radio show on WLTD-AM in Chicago, my hometown.

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