(AP Photo/Jaime Henry-White)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as qualifying continues for the 2018 Georgia elections, the 6th District Congressional Race draws a surprise Democratic candidate.  The race may now become a referendum on gun control.  At the State Capitol, time is running out for Cobb County leaders to decide whether they want to join a highly-touted regional transit funding plan.  Plus, the ACLU accuses a Georgia sheriff’s office of hosting a conference featuring a known anti-Muslim, a poll that shows one GOP candidate for governor gaining support, and why House Speaker Paul Ryan is coming to Atlanta.

On this edition of Political Rewind, qualifying for every race on the Georgia ballot begins today, and for the first time in recent memory, newly energized Democrats are looking to challenge GOP supremacy in the state legislature and in statewide offices.  Plus, Secretary of State Brian Kemp is bowing to pressure to change what the ACLU calls misleading voter registration forms.  Will questions about the integrity of Georgia elections hamper Kemp in his race for governor? 


AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

ACLU Of Georgia Names Former DeKalb CEO Burrell Ellis Political Director

Dec 5, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

A former county leader whose convictions on corruption charges were tossed out by the state's highest court has been named political director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.

The organization on Monday announced that former DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis would fill the newly created position, which is meant to expand the organization's advocacy infrastructure and help push its public policy objectives.

The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday when it hears oral arguments in a case that promises to have major repercussions for law enforcement and personal privacy.

At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers.

Cellphone thieves caught because they used ... cellphones

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

The highest court in Massachusetts ruled Monday that local law enforcement cannot keep people in custody solely at the request of federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The practice, often known as an "ICE detainer," enabled federal authorities to take a longer look at the immigration status of people whom they suspect might be in the country illegally, even if they were otherwise free to leave.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

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Landmark Decision in LGBT Workers' Rights Case

May 16, 2017

For the first time, a federal court has ruled workers can’t be fired for their sexual orientation. A court in Chicago recently extended workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community.  A similar case in Georgia is up for appeal. We talk with a lawyer for both cases, Greg Nevins, and with Andrea Young, director of the ACLU of Georgia.