african american

This week we’re hearing how some descendants are passing along Gullah heritage to the next generation. Patricia West is a writer and professor at Savannah State University. She was inspired to document her family’s roots after discovering her great great-grandmother’s grave on a trip to the family cemetery. 

The Scott-West family is also looking for ways to celebrate their history. Later this week, we will join them at the centuries-old cemetery where their American heritage begins, for a libations ceremony honoring ancestors.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There's no future in crabbing.

That's the conclusion Earnest McIntosh, Sr. came to when his son, Ernest McIntosh, Jr. said he wanted to work with his father on the water near their home in Harris Neck, Ga., in McIntosh County. 

"I couldn't see a future into crabbing. But I could see it into oysters," McIntosh, Sr. said. 

That's farmed oysters. Earnest Sr. grew up watching his father work on a crab boat. Earnest Jr. did the same with his dad. Tending to metal cages of oysters spread around the marshland that they lease is what they are hoping will allow them to continue the tradition. 

Mashama Bailey is a fan. Bailey is the head, James Beard Award nominated chef at The Grey restaurant in Savannah. Harris Neck oysters are the first item on the online menu for the restaurant in face.

On a drive from Savannah to Florida, Bailey said she caught the odor of Harris Neck oysters on the wind. 

"They're marshy and funky but they're also clean and salty at the same time," Bailey said. 

In this short film, head out onto the water near Harris Neck where the oysters are farmed with Bailey and the McIntoshes. 

Cindy Hill / GPB

Think Christmas music and there are sounds that probably jump to mind. 

There's Bing Crosby, Vince Guaraldi, maybe Handel's "Messiah." Well, as it turns out, one of the oldest African-American musical traditions is also tied to Christmas.

That's the Ring Shout, still performed by the Geechee and Gullah people of the Georgia and South Carolina coast.

Don't know the Shout? Meet the McIntosh County Ring Shouters. We caught up with them introducing their music to children at a recent Savannah Music Festival Musical Explorers concert.  

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

For generations, Atlanta has been known unofficially as the black capital of America. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

The 'Sweet Auburn' Neighborhood in Atlanta

As cities like Atlanta grapple with Confederate history and what to do with symbols like America’s largest Confederate memorial atop Stone Mountain, there’s a push to recognize places of cultural significance for African-Americans.

The National Trust, in partnership with The Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation and Open Society Foundation, announced the creation of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.  

This February is Black History Month, a time when the nation honors the contributions of African Americans. On Second Thought host Celeste Headlee says she doesn't really like Black History Month, but not for the reasons you might expect. 

Natasha Trethewey: 'We Have Seen'

Sep 19, 2016
Wikipedia

Just over 53 years ago, a bomb exploded at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The predominately African-American congregation was preparing for Sunday service.

Four girls -- Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley -- were killed. Many other people were hurt.

chroniclesofharriet

This weekend, the State of Black Science Fiction Convention will be held in Atlanta and will feature a wide range of panels, cosplay, and exhibits featuring black creators. Afro-futurism, "steam funk," and other types of black-inspired creations will be on display during the weekend event.

We talk with the founders of SOBSFCON, Balogun Ojetade and Milton Davis, along with author Ytasha Womack about black science fiction and diversity in comics, animation, and more.

Professor Raymond Gavins passed away last week, at the age of 77,  leaving behind a powerful legacy from his time as a historian at Duke University. The Atlanta native helped build an audio treasure trove of previously unheard African-American voices from the era of legalized segregation.  The collection is known as the "Behind the Veil Project."

We take a moment to eulogize Gavins and remember the arduous journey he took in order to better his fellow man. 

Beau Cabell / Telegraph of Macon

Gordon Smith  is one of the few African American players on the J.V. baseball team at Mount de Sales Academy in Macon, Ga. 

On a recent, Spring like afternoon the baby-faced shortstop and the other players took some serious batting practice. What was clear is that Smith loves baseball.