ajc

Today on “Two Way Street” we’re discussing The New York Times obituary project “Overlooked” with its co-creator Jessica Bennett. From Ida B.

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

Who Should Be Watching Our Elected Officials?

Jun 7, 2017
Discover DeKalb

Bad behavior by government officials is investigated by ethics boards. In Georgia the members of such boards are usually chosen by private organizations. But a DeKalb County judge recently ruled against that practice, saying it’s unconstitutional for people who weren’t elected to choose local government watchdogs.

PIXBAY

Gambling laws in the Peach State are some of the most restrictive in the country. Georgia is one of only five states that does not allow commercial, tribal, or racetrack betting. But companies like MGM and Wynn Resorts are pushing for legalized gambling in Georgia, which will be a hot-button issue in the next legislative season. 

We speak with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey and Georgia Tech economics professor Tibor Besedes about the impact legalized gambling could have on the state. 

wikipedia.org

The nationwide debate concerning transgender bathroom access has finally made its way to Georgia. A policy issued from the White House states that school systems that deny transgender youths access to the facilities of their choice could lose federal aid as a result.

We chat with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Eric Stirgus about the mandate and what effect it may have on Georgia schools.

commons.wikipedia.org

In Georgia, state legislatures are conducted on a part time basis. Most legislators are also involved in major secular fields, including medicine, law, and real estate. A recent Atlanta Journal Constitution article cites that many of these legislators are bringing bills to the floor that will directly benefit their personal career field.

We talk to AJC reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin about the potential for conflicts of interest when part-time lawmakers deal with policies that can affect their own bottom line.