Athens

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

University of Georgia

In 2015, construction workers at the University of Georgia made a startling discovery. They dug up a human skull while working on an addition to a classroom building. Eventually, archeologists discovered more than 100 gravesites. Some of them could have been slaves.  Some in Athens’ black community are upset with the way the university handled the remains.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

It’s nearly spring. That means plants will begin to peek out of the soil again, insects return in force, and you might start to see more critters wandering around. On this show, we focus on Georgia’s wildlife from the bushy tailed variety that climb our trees, to the ancient shelled kind that swim off our shores.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

On today’s “Two Way Street” we talk with Rodger Lyle Brown, the author of “Party Out of Bounds: The B-52s, R.E.M. and the Kids Who Rocked Athens, Georgia.” It’s the story of how Athens became the center of the rock and roll universe starting around 1980 and continuing for almost 20 years.

University Of Georgia

The University of Georgia will rebury the bodies that were discovered during the construction of Baldwin Hall in December 2015. The remains of 105 individuals were found during work on the expansion of Baldwin Hall, which is adjacent to the Old Athens Cemetery. During the 19th century, the Old Athens Cemetery operated as the official town cemetery.

We dedicate our entire show to the way Southerners speak.

Where did y’all come from? We can trace the use of the word “y’all” all the way back to our colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson.

Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why “America Needs Y’all.”

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We learned more about the fight to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS with Tiffany Roan, the state’s regional director for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

Tom Wolf / Flickr

The University System of Georgia is making an antidote for opioid overdoses available on all its campuses.  The drug Naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose on opioids like heroin and fentanyl.

The use and addiction of the opioid heroin has increased throughout the United States and is trending among 18-25 year olds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a little over 1,300 people died in Georgia from opioid overdoses in 2015, the most recent year with available data.

UGA Approves $63 Million Sanford Stadium Enhancement

Feb 15, 2017
Pruddle / Wikimedia Commons

A $63 million enhancement to Georgia's Sanford Stadium that will provide a new locker room has been approved by the athletic association's board of directors.

The project also includes a new video board, a plaza for fans to use on game days and a room to host recruits. The project approved at the board's quarterly meeting on Tuesday is expected to be completed in time for the 2018 season.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

On this special Valentine's Day show, we spend the day talking to Georgia couples who’ve kept romance alive even though they work together. We also talk about the challenge of being single, along with the falling divorce rate.

We start with a story of truly enduring love. J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers brings us their timeless story of romance.

Former UGA Player, Woman, Child Die In House Fire

Feb 13, 2017
Monroe Fire Department

Quentin Moses, a former Miami Dolphins linebacker who played for the University of Georgia, was found dead by firefighters in Monroe, Georgia early Sunday morning. A 31-year-old woman and her 10-year-old daughter were also found dead at the scene. 

This is show is a celebration of Black History Month. Since 1970, February has been dedicated to celebrating the contributions and achievements of African-Americans. We talk about the "Bank Black" movement, some tragic history in Savannah, a daring escape from Macon, and even how to handle a controversial term in the classroom.

 

A study by Emory University found that people view the term “African-American” more favorably than “black.” We talked with Erika Hall, who worked on the study, about what this might mean for prospective job seekers.

This year we present a continuing series called “Georgia Eats.” We’ll bring you great conversations with farmers, chefs, cooks, scientists and even some delicious recipes you may want to try. 

The "Justin Bieber of the Southern organic crowd," that's how the New York Times described Will Harris of White Oak Pastures. It’s the largest USDA organic farm in Georgia and the only farm in the country with both beef and poultry slaughterhouses. We talked to him and Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media about the outlook for organic meat.

Vince Dooley racked up more than 200 wins, six SEC championships, and a national football championship. Dooley has also written a number of books, including a volume on gardening. But for his first article in a scholarly journal, Dooley chose to revisit football history. In 1942, and there were not one, but two football teams at the University of Georgia.  Both ranked as top in the nation. Coach Vince Dooley joined us in 2015 to talk about that history.

 

 

haley / Flickr

The food scene in Athens, Georgia is experiencing explosive growth. Restaurants like Five And Ten and The National have put the small city on the culinary map.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Cindy Wilson co-founded The B-52s in Athens, Georgia in 1976. Now she’s back on tour, premiering material from her forthcoming, full-length solo album, “Change.” She drops by the studio to chat about her life and music. You can hear music from the new album recorded live in the GPB Performance Studio in the video below. 

Kmeron / Foter

Indie musician Kishi Bashi boasts an impressive resume. He's performed violin on stage with Regina Spektor and Athens psychedelic group Of Montreal. 

His real name is Kaoru Ishibashi, but in 2011 he adopted the pseudonym 'Kishi Bashi' and launched his own solo career. His first two albums were largely violin centric. On his album "151a" (pronounced Ichi-Go-Ichi-Eh), violin looping and vocal effects dominate the tracks.

NPR

In music, we can escape the cruelties of the world or face them.

Southern music is hot right now. From Americana to hip hop, there are plenty of artists seeking to hang their sound on the hook of some piece of the Southern musical tradition. Meanwhile, there are other artists who have unmistakably carved out a piece of Southern sonic soil for themselves, even if unintentionally. Athens band New Madrid could fall into this second category.

U.S. News and World Report has released its annual ranking of top national and liberal arts universities. Four of Georgia’s colleges and universities were ranked among the nation's best. More than 1347 institutions are ranked in the report. 

Emory, Georgia Tech, the University of Georgia, and Mercer are the state's highest ranking schools.

In this episode of Just Off The Radar, hear some of Kishi Bashi's new album Sonderlust, due out September 16, plus tracks from Joanna Gruesome, tacocat and more.  

Track listing....

We catch up with singer/songwriter and former Georgia resident Matthew Sweet as he prepares to release his next studio album “Tomorrow Forever”

Wikimedia Commons

Singer Kate Pierson has been a staple of Georgia's music scene since the early 1970s. She is a founding member of the B-52s. She has also collaborated with the likes of R.E.M., the Ramones, Iggy Pop and many others. Her first solo album was released in 2015. She adds two songs to our Georgia Playlist, a couple classics from James Brown and Little Richard.

R.E.M.

R.E.M. made the world listen. Formed in 1980, the quartet out of Athens, Georgia exploded the old idea of what pop music is all about. The 25th anniversary edition of the band’s iconic “Out of Time” album is set to be released in November. A 2014 MTV documentary explores the band’s Georgia roots.

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