Athens

Photo courtesy of Cicada Rhythm

Cicadas are expected to return to Georgia this year after a long hiatus. Athens band Cicada Rhythm paid tribute to the raucous insects by naming their band after them. We ask Dave Kirslis to add some favorites to our essential Georgia Playlist.

Thousands of scientists plan to march on Washington this weekend. We look at how science is changing the world around us.

 

Before he was elected, President Trump called climate change a hoax. Now, he is rolling back policies meant to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Georges Benjamin says combating climate change is a public health issue. He’s the Executive Director of the American Public Health Association. He joined us with Peter Dykstra, the publisher of Environmental Health News.

Kevin Christopher Burke / Foter

A fraternity at the University of Georgia was recently suspended for a year for misconduct during a hazing ceremony. A ban on new bars opening in Downtown Athens took effect in February. All this points to a problem with partying.

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner. He joins us with Sue Sturgis of the online energy magazine, Facing South.

A special election is coming up in a week to fill Tom Price’s vacated seat in Georgia’s 6th Congressional district. The race is both contentious and expensive, by-products of the modern democratic process. We talked about our democracy and its health.

Centuries ago, Plato predicted that democracy is always doomed to fail. Was he right? We asked two political science experts: Robert Pirro of Georgia Southern University and Michael Evans of Georgia State University.

Memaw's At LG's Restaurant

Georgia leads Southern states in hospitality, according to a recent survey from Twiddy.com. What does Southern Hospitality really mean?

I-85 Arson Suspect Could Face Federal Charges

Apr 5, 2017
Henry P. Taylor / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Investigators say the man accused of starting the raging fire that caused the collapse of a section of I-85 in Atlanta on March 30 could face federal charges.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives assistant special-agent-in-charge James Deir told WSB-TV on Wednesday that Basil Eleby could be charged with federal offenses after the U.S. attorney's office reviews the March 30 incident.

Ghosts aren’t just people who were once alive. They can also be entire towns – thriving communities that now only exist in memory, historical documents or the remnants of old buildings. We learned more about some of these communities from Lisa Russell, author of the book, “Lost Towns of North Georgia.”

When a person dies, a part of them can remain with the living. That’s the case for one spirit in Savannah at the Sorrel Weed House Museum. We get a ghost story from the museum’s operation manager, Nicholas Wood.

UGA

University of Georgia officials say they plan a public talk about human remains found during a campus construction project, and about the history of slavery at the institution.

Workers on a campus construction project discovered the first of the remains from more than 100 burial sites in late 2015, on land that was once part of Athens' main burial ground. The remains were reinterred at an Athens cemetery.

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

University of Georgia

In 2015, construction workers at the University of Georgia made a startling discovery. They dug up a human skull while working on an addition to a classroom building. Eventually, archeologists discovered more than 100 gravesites. Some of them could have been slaves.  Some in Athens’ black community are upset with the way the university handled the remains.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

It’s nearly spring. That means plants will begin to peek out of the soil again, insects return in force, and you might start to see more critters wandering around. On this show, we focus on Georgia’s wildlife from the bushy tailed variety that climb our trees, to the ancient shelled kind that swim off our shores.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

On today’s “Two Way Street” we talk with Rodger Lyle Brown, the author of “Party Out of Bounds: The B-52s, R.E.M. and the Kids Who Rocked Athens, Georgia.” It’s the story of how Athens became the center of the rock and roll universe starting around 1980 and continuing for almost 20 years.

University Of Georgia

The University of Georgia will rebury the bodies that were discovered during the construction of Baldwin Hall in December 2015. The remains of 105 individuals were found during work on the expansion of Baldwin Hall, which is adjacent to the Old Athens Cemetery. During the 19th century, the Old Athens Cemetery operated as the official town cemetery.

We dedicate our entire show to the way Southerners speak.

Where did y’all come from? We can trace the use of the word “y’all” all the way back to our colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson.

Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why “America Needs Y’all.”

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We learned more about the fight to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS with Tiffany Roan, the state’s regional director for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

Tom Wolf / Flickr

The University System of Georgia is making an antidote for opioid overdoses available on all its campuses.  The drug Naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose on opioids like heroin and fentanyl.

The use and addiction of the opioid heroin has increased throughout the United States and is trending among 18-25 year olds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a little over 1,300 people died in Georgia from opioid overdoses in 2015, the most recent year with available data.

UGA Approves $63 Million Sanford Stadium Enhancement

Feb 15, 2017
Pruddle / Wikimedia Commons

A $63 million enhancement to Georgia's Sanford Stadium that will provide a new locker room has been approved by the athletic association's board of directors.

The project also includes a new video board, a plaza for fans to use on game days and a room to host recruits. The project approved at the board's quarterly meeting on Tuesday is expected to be completed in time for the 2018 season.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

On this special Valentine's Day show, we spend the day talking to Georgia couples who’ve kept romance alive even though they work together. We also talk about the challenge of being single, along with the falling divorce rate.

We start with a story of truly enduring love. J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers brings us their timeless story of romance.

Former UGA Player, Woman, Child Die In House Fire

Feb 13, 2017
Monroe Fire Department

Quentin Moses, a former Miami Dolphins linebacker who played for the University of Georgia, was found dead by firefighters in Monroe, Georgia early Sunday morning. A 31-year-old woman and her 10-year-old daughter were also found dead at the scene. 

This is show is a celebration of Black History Month. Since 1970, February has been dedicated to celebrating the contributions and achievements of African-Americans. We talk about the "Bank Black" movement, some tragic history in Savannah, a daring escape from Macon, and even how to handle a controversial term in the classroom.

 

A study by Emory University found that people view the term “African-American” more favorably than “black.” We talked with Erika Hall, who worked on the study, about what this might mean for prospective job seekers.

This year we present a continuing series called “Georgia Eats.” We’ll bring you great conversations with farmers, chefs, cooks, scientists and even some delicious recipes you may want to try. 

The "Justin Bieber of the Southern organic crowd," that's how the New York Times described Will Harris of White Oak Pastures. It’s the largest USDA organic farm in Georgia and the only farm in the country with both beef and poultry slaughterhouses. We talked to him and Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media about the outlook for organic meat.

Vince Dooley racked up more than 200 wins, six SEC championships, and a national football championship. Dooley has also written a number of books, including a volume on gardening. But for his first article in a scholarly journal, Dooley chose to revisit football history. In 1942, and there were not one, but two football teams at the University of Georgia.  Both ranked as top in the nation. Coach Vince Dooley joined us in 2015 to talk about that history.

 

 

haley / Flickr

The food scene in Athens, Georgia is experiencing explosive growth. Restaurants like Five And Ten and The National have put the small city on the culinary map.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Cindy Wilson co-founded The B-52s in Athens, Georgia in 1976. Now she’s back on tour, premiering material from her forthcoming, full-length solo album, “Change.” She drops by the studio to chat about her life and music. You can hear music from the new album recorded live in the GPB Performance Studio in the video below. 

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