Atlanta

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On today’s show we talk to two singer-songwriters who are part of the rich community of musical artists who live and work in Nashville – one of the great music mecca’s of this country.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we are one month into the Trump administration and for members of the American media, it’s been a very rocky road so far. From Steve Bannon’s declaration that the media are the “opposition party” to yesterday’s unorthodox presidential press briefing, the disconnect is very real and very apparent. 

Sean Powers and Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

Since we did our show live from Savannah for the Savannah Book Festival, we organized a special edition of The Breakroom featuring all authors. The panel included Alejandro Danois, Karin Slaughter, Nicki Salcedo, and Mike Lowery.

 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Matt Barnett / Flickr

A new education bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Kevin Tanner would allow the state to provide systems of support and assistance for low-performing schools in Georgia.

One of the featured authors at the festival is Forbes Financial Columnist John Tamny, who is author of the book “Who Needs the Fed?” We take a look at the role of the fed, and ask Tamny about how it may change in the Trump administration. The Fed also will see some big changes this month in Atlanta, as the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta steps down.

 

 

Georgia House Panel Approves Bill Allowing Guns On Campus

Feb 17, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Licensed gun owners could carry concealed handguns on public college campuses under legislation that began advancing Thursday in the Georgia House despite the Republican governor's forceful veto of a similar bill last year.

A subcommittee of the House Public Safety Committee approved the bill sponsored by Rep. Mandi Ballinger, R-Canton, sending it on to the full committee. Georgia is among 17 states that ban concealed weapons on campus.

Emory University / flickr

Dennis Lockhart, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, will step down this month. The Federal Reserve may be in for changes in the months ahead. It is an important agency, but there’s one problem. Not a lot of average Americans understand what the Fed is or what it does. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.

Climate Reality Project

Several hundred climate scientists and public health professionals descended on the Carter Center in Atlanta today. It was for a climate and health conference organized by former Vice President Al Gore. 

New research from the Pew Research Center finds over a quarter of Americans adults haven’t read a book in the last year--in part or in whole. That includes all forms of reading, such as print, e-books, and audio books. We talk about this with Austin Dickson, Executive Director of Literacy Action, and Emily Rubin, Educational Outreach Specialist for the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta.

Senators Work To Slash THC Potency In Medical Cannabis

Feb 16, 2017
Bob Doran / Flickr

Georgia Senators are working to slash the potency of medical cannabis oil while slightly expanding access.

The bill passed the full Senate Thursday with a vote of 41-12 after lengthy debate and the rejection of three amendments proposed during discussion.

Bryan Cox / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into immigration issues, something that touches the lives and businesses of more Georgians than you might realize. 

Tom Wolf / Flickr

The University System of Georgia is making an antidote for opioid overdoses available on all its campuses.  The drug Naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose on opioids like heroin and fentanyl.

The use and addiction of the opioid heroin has increased throughout the United States and is trending among 18-25 year olds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a little over 1,300 people died in Georgia from opioid overdoses in 2015, the most recent year with available data.

Lawmakers Trying To Ease Restrictions On Alcohol Sales

Feb 15, 2017
Thomas Cizauskas / CC

The Georgia brewery bill has turned into the booze bill.

Lawmakers combined legislation that allows breweries to sell directly to the customer with another proposal that would permit distilleries to do the same thing.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

Georgia Special Election To Replace Tom Price Shapes Up As Referendum On Trump

Feb 15, 2017
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

The scramble to succeed Health Secretary Tom Price as Georgia congressman may quickly become a referendum on the popularity and agenda of Price's new boss, President Donald Trump, while offering a preview of 2018's midterm elections.

Democrats are looking for an upset in the GOP-leaning district where Trump underperformed among the affluent, well-educated residents of the northern Atlanta suburbs. Trump narrowly topped Democrat Hillary Clinton, but fell shy of a majority even as Price cruised to re-election with more than 60 percent of the vote.

University of Georgia Press

Food is an integral part of the South’s identity, and all this year, we’re paying homage to Southern cuisine. It’s a series we call Georgia Eats. A lot of chefs and food writers know the name Mrs. S.R. Dull. In 1928, she wrote the book "Southern Cooking," which has been described as the "bible" of Southern cooking. That got us thinking if there are any other cookbooks that rise to that level.

Greenland Travel / Flickr

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference.

FLICKR

One of the ways African-Americans have shared the pain and the pleasure of the black experience is through music.  

 

Black artists have been an essential part of almost every genre of music. And black songs are often catalysts for change and enhanced public awareness.

Kiezers / Wikimedia Commons

A special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court has sided with Georgia in the state’s long-running dispute with Florida over water rights in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin.

Matt Terrell

If you live in the South, you are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says one in 51 Georgians will contract the virus in their lifetime.

Atlanta is considered to have a "concentrated HIV epidemic," largely due to poverty and high-risk behaviors such as injectable drug use.

A new public art exhibition opening Valentine's Day at Centennial Olympic Park illustrates Atlanta's growing HIV infection rate.

It's called "Atlanta's HIV+ Population Now."

On this special Valentine's Day show, we spend the day talking to Georgia couples who’ve kept romance alive even though they work together. We also talk about the challenge of being single, along with the falling divorce rate.

We start with a story of truly enduring love. J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers brings us their timeless story of romance.

FLICKR

Computer Science students at Morehouse College are working on a project to help save young minority men from incarceration.

They have created a tool that uses visualization technology to help organizations analyze data from more than 200 youth facilities nationwide. The goal is to help these detention centers determine the most effective reform methods so resources can be allocated more efficiently.

 

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” State Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) continues his push to expand the legal use of medical marijuana in the state of Georgia. 

gopleader / flickr

Betsy DeVos was confirmed last week as President Donald Trump’s secretary of education. She has been an aggressive proponent of school choice, but her definition of school choice may not be the same as how other people define it. School choice is one of those phrases that gets thrown around a lot, but is often misunderstood. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.  

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Hundreds of refugees from Syria now call Georgia home. We hear from two of them, who have become good friends. One of them is a man who arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

 

Former UGA Player, Woman, Child Die In House Fire

Feb 13, 2017
Monroe Fire Department

Quentin Moses, a former Miami Dolphins linebacker who played for the University of Georgia, was found dead by firefighters in Monroe, Georgia early Sunday morning. A 31-year-old woman and her 10-year-old daughter were also found dead at the scene. 

E.K. Sluder

On Friday February 3, GPB Atlanta broadcasted "All Things Considered" live from the High Museum of Art's monthly "First Friday" event.

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget. Republicans leading the repeal effort call the money a “slush fund.” That means to imply that millions of untracked dollars are used for projects that have little benefit for public health. Joining us to discuss this is Andy Miller, editor for Georgia Health News.

Raed Mansour / Foter

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget.

On today’s show we’re going to talk to historian and author Timothy Tyson. His new book, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” is an in-depth exploration of the horrific 1955 murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, the Chicago boy who traveled to Money, Mississippi to visit his mother’s family and who after a fateful chance encounter with a white woman in a general store was kidnapped and brutally murdered.

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