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YukunChen / Foter

A new form of the "campus carry" bill is advancing in the Georgia legislative session. The bill would effectively permit concealed carry of firearms on public colleges across the state. Governor Nathan Deal vetoed a similar measure in last years’ legislative session. With us to discuss the new version is Maureen Downey, education reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also with us by phone is Matthew Boedy, Professor of English at the University of North Georgia.

Crystal Hernandez

Federal data show the suicide rate among veterans has risen over the last decade. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs approached this problem with a 24-hour call center in upstate New York.

donnierayjones / Foter

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men.

Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us to talk about the findings.

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Experts Worry About Loopholes In Prescription Drug Bill

3 hours ago
Frankie Leon / Flickr/CC

Georgia lawmakers have reached a compromise on a bill that would require doctors to log into a pill-tracking database before prescribing painkillers and other high-risk drugs. The goal is to curtail the overprescribing of opioids.

But critics say loopholes written into the proposal would create a false sense of accomplishment while leaving patients exposed to harm. Physician groups counter that the exceptions are necessary to reduce the burden on already strained doctors.

Strong Storms Kill 1, Damage Homes Across The South

3 hours ago

Severe storms caused at least one death, damaged homes, downed trees and knocked out power as areas around the South were pounded with wind, rain and hail.

In Georgia, northeast of Atlanta, Jackson County Sheriff Janis Mangum says a man, his wife and two children were in a bedroom when a tree crashed into the home, killing the man Tuesday evening. Mangum said his wife and children survived "by the grace of God."

Gary Waters / Getty Images

No human being is free of bias, but we’re mostly unaware of them. Politicians aren’t, though, and they use our unconscious biases to convince us that what’s true is false and vice versa. Appealing to emotions, rather than reason, can be a very persuasive strategy. We talked about this tactic with Kennesaw State psychology professor Roxanne Donovan and Penn State media studies professor Shyam Sundar.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Earlier this year, President Donald Trump issued an executive order calling for sheriffs and police departments to take a larger role in immigrations enforcement.

He asked them to join a voluntary Immigrations and Customs Enforcement program called 287(g), which extends the reach of immigration agents into counties across the country.

But the program is nothing new for northwest Georgia’s Whitfield County, where one-third of the population is Hispanic.

After a nearly decade of participation by the county sheriff’s office, 287(g) still divides the community.

 

 

Courtesy Peter Bergen

Today on “Political Rewind” we spend the full hour with terrorism expert Peter Bergen. The author of "The United States of Jihad," Bergen is an authority on the topic. In addition to being CNN's Terror Analyst, Bergen is one of the few Western journalists to have interviewed Osama bin Laden in 1997. In the era of travel bans targeting mostly Muslim nations, Bergen says his research shows that the terrorists are already among us, like the Tsarnaev brothers who masterminded the Boston Marathon bombings. They may have been born here, or they may be naturalized U.S.

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss. Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

j_v_tran / Foter

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss.

Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

AMC

The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention has made countless appearances on the big and small screen from the 1995 thriller “Outbreak” to an explosive debut on the first season of the hit show “The Walking Dead.”  GPB's Sean Powers walks us through some of the CDC’s most memorable roles and how the agency has been portrayed by Hollywood.  

Public Domain

Environmental advocates say Georgia’s water supplies could be at risk if Congress approves President Trump's proposal to cut $2.5 billion from the  Environmental Protection Agency’s budget.

If approved, the budget would slash the EPA's funding by 31 percent and lay off over 3,000 workers. 

Gil Rodgers is the director of the Georgia and Alabama offices of the Southern Environmental Law Center. He says the EPA plays a big role in protecting many facets of the state's environment. 

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

The NPR Two-Way blog will provide live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The live blog will include streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

@ATLUTD

After securing their first win on the road last weekend, Atlanta United FC put together another signature performance to capture their first home win on Saturday.

Atlanta United (2-1) shut out the Chicago Fire (1-2) by a score of 4-0 in the afternoon contest.

Our guest today on “Two Way Street” is George Saunders. We’re going to talk about his new book “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which has been one of the most eagerly anticipated works of fiction in a long time.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we first discuss a late-breaking report that recently fired U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating stock trades made by HHS Secretary (and former Georgia congressman) Tom Price. The report appeared on the website ProPublica.

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. The University has made an initial statement, but no other comments have been made. With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Congress of local and regional authorities / Foter

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. 

With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Andre Johnson Photography

Rachael Shaner is the frontwoman for Savannah band Lulu The Giant. They performed live on our show last week during a broadcast from the Stopover Music Festival. Rachael gives us her two picks for the essential Georgia Playlist.

Lulu The Giant performs at Smith's Olde Bar on April 1 at 8 p.m.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with no shortage of news to discuss. We’ll talk about Snoop Dogg’s controversial new music video, and think about why the new "Beauty and the Beast" film is so upsetting to some people. Then, we’ll discuss whether Georgia should be encouraging coyote hunting, and look back at the viral video of a family exposed on a live BBC interview. 

The Breakroom panel today is:

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

The Trump administration unveiled its proposed 2018 budget Thursday morning. Unsurprisingly, the budget calls for significant increases in military and border security spending while dramatically reducing the funding for a number of other government agencies.

Several of those cuts, including reductions at the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will affect a variety of Georgia-based programs that receive federal funding.

 

Coretta Scott King was not just the wife of the late civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. She was also an accomplished activist in her own right.

 

She traveled the world and advocated for racial and social equality for people of all walks of life.

 

In 1968, the same year her husband was assassinated, Scott-King founded the King Center, which has served as a base of operations for modern day activism.

 

 

 

 

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Audi USA / Foter

The autonomous vehicle industry may soon find a home in Atlanta. That’s because the city is one of three global cities chosen for the "Safer Roads Challenge." That effort brings together manufacturing and tech companies with the common goal of making traffic safer. Part of that initiative is the implementation of self-driving cars.

With us is Faye DiMassimo, General Manager of the Renew Atlanta Bond, and Michael Hunter, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech.

Brad Clinesmith / Foter

The motor vehicle death rate in Georgia has jumped by more than 30 percent since 2014. That’s the fifth highest jump in the nation, where fatalities comparatively rose only 14 percent. Those numbers come from a National Safety Council study released last month. The top three killers: speed, alcohol, and distraction.

We invited Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation, to shed some light on this.

Photo courtesy of John Harris

"Mr. Tuck And the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first elementary school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted thirteen students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck.

The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We spoke with Harris along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Georgia American Revolution Preservation Alliance

More than 200 years ago, the British Army made its first push into the American South. The Georgian Continental Army lost to the British during the American Revolution at Brier Creek. Today, another battle is being waged over threats to the preservation of this historic 500-acre site.

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