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On this edition of Political Rewind, the candidates for Mayor of Atlanta slug it out in their first runoff debate.  Did we learn anything new about the matchup between Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood?   A Democratic state representative has introduced legislation to ban “bump stocks” in Georgia and one GOP candidate for governor is already attacking the measure.  How will it fare in the 2018 session?  Plus, after attacking GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, Democrats now have one of their own being called out for sexual harassment.  How will the Al Franken episode resonate on Cap

New $1.6B Mercedes-Benz Stadium Rises; Georgia Dome To Be Destroyed

19 hours ago
Mike Stewart / AP Photo/File

The Dome wasn't built in a day, but it will be demolished in a flash on Monday morning.

Courtesy of the Atlanta Falcons, GPB will have a live stream of the implosion beginning at 7:00 a.m., Monday, Nov. 20. We will also have an on-demand video of the demolition available shortly after the event in case you miss the live broadcast.

Check out gpb.org/dome for our complete coverage of the Georgia Dome demolition.

We dedicate an entire show to the Southern drawl. Y’all listen up now…

Where did y’all come from, anyway? We can trace the use of the word all the way back to colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson. Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why y'all is needed.

In today's headlines:

  • Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance Bottoms square off in their first debate
  • A bump stock ban in Georgia could be on the horizon
  • Preparations for Monday's implosion of the Georgia Dome are moving forward

CAROLINE HAYE / PHASE:3

It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race, but one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race. But one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture. In 2011, the Public Religion Research Institute found only 30 percent of white evangelicals thought elected officials who commit an immoral act could still fulfill their public duties. In 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 72 percent. We talk with Dan Cox,  Director of Research for PRRI.

ATRIA BOOKS

Chilean-American novelist Isabel Allende has written a lot about the immigrant experience. Allende is a former journalist who fled Chile after the 1973 assassination of her uncle, who was that country’s president. She’s in Atlanta on Thursday, November 16, to promote her latest book, "In the Midst of Winter." She's speaking at the Atlanta History Center.

FLICKR

Today's headlines include:

  • Atlanta's first mayoral runoff debate between Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance-Bottoms
  • A recount is scheduled for Michael Julien Bond's city council seat
  • An event in Lawrenceville invites white people to "Come Meet A Black Person"
  • Mercedes Benz Stadium is recognized as one of the world's most sustainable venues
     

(AP Photo)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," "Hardball" host Chris Matthews joins us to discuss his new book, which offers fresh insights on the life of Robert Kennedy.  Matthews sees Kennedy as a shining example of the kind, moral leader he thinks is absent from the political scene today. Also, we’ll look at the latest developments in Alabama and in Washington in the ongoing Roy Moore controversy. Despite increasing pressure, Moore seems determined to say in the race. Plus, Hillary Clinton tells a packed house in Atlanta that Trump fever has broken and the tide is turning.

School Dress Codes Ruffle Feathers

Nov 15, 2017
http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com

Atlanta Public Schools may institute a dress code to ban clothing considered distracting by school officials. At Monday night’s Board of Education meeting, two fifth-grade girls said the language of the code unfairly targets them, and not boys. They both wore leggings, which would be against the proposed rules. 

DC Pest Controll

Savannah attracts a whole lot of tourists. And, if you believe pest control experts at Terminix, an over-supply of rats. Terminix recently named Savannah the most rodent-infested city in America, overtaking Atlanta, which has seen its fair share of rodent woes. When Atlanta was still tops for rats, we invited Jason Chapman, vice-president of sales at Peachtree Pest Control to talk about why the city found itself home to so many rodents.

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Foter

The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore fights back against allegations he once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Response to the explosive report is further splitting the GOP. Also, Tom Price is out as Health and Human Services Secretary, but an investigation into his use of luxury private jets and the leaks that led to his ouster continue to rock the department. Plus, two former mayors of Atlanta weigh in on the dynamics of the runoff mayoral contest. They contend that city hall corruption will be an issue, as will race.

Cybercrimes Present Unique Challenges For Investigators

Nov 13, 2017
Mike Stewart / AP Photo/File

The federal investigators looking into the breach that exposed personal information maintained by the Equifax credit report company are used to dealing with high-profile hacks and the challenges they present.

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

Kennesaw State University: Cheerleaders Who Knelt For Anthem To Be On Field

Nov 9, 2017

A Georgia university which moved its football cheerleaders inside a stadium tunnel after a group of black cheer squad members knelt during the national anthem has decided to let them again take the field during pre-game ceremonies.

This time, it will be at a game where military members are honored.

In a letter to students and faculty, Kennesaw State University President Sam Olens said Wednesday that freedom of speech must be protected.

Could Atlanta Be On Track To Elect A White Mayor?

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

On Nov. 7, none of the 12 candidates for mayor of Atlanta received more than 50 percent of the vote.

That means the two candidates with the most votes, Councilwomen Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood, will face off in a Dec. 5 runoff. Lance Bottoms is black. Norwood is white.

Could 2017 be the year that Atlanta elects its first white mayor in more than a generation?

Mayor Keisha? Ethnic Names No Obstacle For Black Candidates

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta's next mayor could be a black woman named Keisha — a prospect that thrills Diamond Harris.

The 28-year-old graphic designer exulted Wednesday on her Facebook page: "Keisha, Keisha, Keisha! I just want a mayor name Keisha."

R.E.M.

R.E.M.’s hit record “Automatic for the People” was released 25 years ago. In 1992, the album hit #2 on the Billboard 200 charts, and became certified 4x platinum in the United States. The record is getting an anniversary re-release, out tomorrow, November 10. We talk with Athens’ own Mike Mills, R.E.M.’s bass player.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

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For over a century, baseball has been known as America’s pastime.

But not everyone has been able to play organized baseball, especially those with special needs.

That’s where the Alternative Baseball Organization wants to make a difference.

It’s a nonprofit program for teens and adults with autism and special needs who want to showcase their talents on the baseball diamond.

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Democrats finally have something to cheer about, chalking up important victories in Virginia and New Jersey while, in Georgia, Dems cut into the dominant GOP majority in the legislatures. The Atlanta mayor’s race heads into a runoff and once again city voters are confronted by a contest divided on racial lines.

jufchicago / flickr

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in "That '70s Show," "Fargo," "Bob’s Burgers," and, of course, "Law and Order." However, he may be best known for his stand up specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." Gaffigan is in Atlanta this weekend for a live show. He told us there is an argument for comedians not to talk about the news.

 

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Veterans Day is this weekend. We meet a veteran named Bradley Field, who works in the film industry. Among his credits: "Detroit," "Suicide Squad," and "Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice." On Second Thought regular Kalena Boller caught up with Bradley just after production wrapped in Atlanta on "Den of Thieves," which is out next year.

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