Atlanta Considered

Rickey Bevington looks at the most interesting stories in the South's most prominent city.

Ways to Connect

Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.


Atlanta’s creative output is impressive.

The metro region has 492 registered arts organizations from museums and galleries to movie theaters to furniture makers.

Statewide, the annual revenue of arts organizations is nearly $800 million.

To learn more about how arts influence the daily lives of Atlantans, Rickey Bevington speaks with Susannah Darrow, Executive Director of Arts ATL, a nonprofit publication providing arts criticism and coverage.

Featured candidates are Peter Aman, Keisha Bottoms, Vincent Fort, Kwanza Hall, Ceasar Mitchell, Mary Norwood, Michael Sterling, and Cathy Woolard. 


Moderated by Rickey Bevington of Georgia Public Broadcasting and Denis O’Hayer of Atlanta Public Broadcasting.


Recorded January 25, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey host the popular podcast Stuff You Missed In History Class in the Atlanta offices at HowStuffWorks at Ponce City Market.

They joined me during our live show from the rooftop of Ponce City Market to talk about what it’s like to produce a history podcast in a historic building – and also some of their personal connections with the Sears company, which built this building in 1926.

Timeline: The History Of Ponce City Market

Nov 14, 2016
Jerry Hancock

Hop's Chicken

We may think about food all the time, but when is the last time you thought about what your food sounded like?

Safe Harbor Yes

The Safe Harbor Act is one of the four amendments Georgians will be voting on in next Tuesday's election.

If it passes, the state will impose additional fees on those convicted of certain sex trafficking crimes, as well as adult entertainment establishments. That money will fund treatment and resources for victims of child sex trafficking.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

For this edition of Atlanta Considered, I went to Chrome Yellow Trading Company on Edgewood Avenue during the A3C hip-hop festival and conference.

A3C is one of the nation’s largest urban music events and stands for All Three Coasts, as Atlanta joins New York and Los Angeles as the pillars of hip-hop culture.


Stephen Fowler / GPB

Atlanta may see a first: Tonight thousands of people may come to a candlelight vigil for a grocery store. "Murder Kroger" as it's known closes its door tomorrow, October 28 after serving Ponce de Leon Avenue for three decades. GPB's Stephen Fowler was live at "Murder Kroger" in the shadow of Ponce City Market. 

Rickey Bevington: So let's begin with why many Atlantans call this supermarket "Murder Kroger." 


Since hip-hop first got its start in 1973, two cities were the main players in driving its style and sound.

On the East Coast there was New York, and on the West Coast there was L.A.

Atlanta is now home to many of hip-hop’s current and former stars, making it the “third coast” in A3C’s “All Three Coasts” moniker.

As the East Coast-West Coast rivalry came to a head in 1995, a duo from Atlanta named OutKast managed to win Best New Rap Group at the Source Awards.

While the New York-heavy crowd booed, Andre 3000 grabbed the award and took the audience to task.