atlanta mayoral race

Recount Doesn't Significantly Alter Atlanta Mayoral Race

Dec 14, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

A recount in the Atlanta mayoral election runoff hasn't altered results significantly.

Election officials in two counties that include parts of Atlanta on Thursday recounted the ballots cast on Dec. 5.

The result: Keisha Lance Bottoms still narrowly leads Mary Norwood, who asked for the recount after Bottoms was declared the winner by a margin of less than 1 percent.

Official Atlanta Mayoral Runoff Results Retain Thin Margin

Dec 12, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

The vote tallies for the runoff election in the Atlanta mayoral race are official, but with a razor-thin margin remaining, the trailing candidate said Monday that she plans to ask for a recount.

Election officials in Fulton and DeKalb counties, which both include parts of Atlanta, certified their votes, which still have Keisha Lance Bottoms winning the race.

Bottoms' lead grew from 759 votes in unofficial tallies released last week to 832 votes in the certified results. That still amounts to less than 1 percent of the votes.

Atlanta Will Soon Know Official Vote Tally In Mayoral Runoff

Dec 11, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Atlanta is a step closer to having an official record of how close its mayoral election runoff was.

Fulton County election officials on Monday morning certified the county's vote totals from the Dec. 5 runoff. Election officials in DeKalb County, which also includes part of Atlanta, planned to certify their results later Monday.

The official Fulton County results show Keisha Lance Bottoms with 42,887 votes, or 51.33 percent, and Mary Norwood with 40,668, or 48.67 percent.

@KeishaBottoms

Election officials in DeKalb and Fulton counties have scheduled meetings on Monday to certify their vote tallies from last week’s runoff election.

In the mayor’s race, Keisha Lance Bottom’s bested Mary Norwood by 759 votes.

After the results are certified, Norwood says she will formally request a recount.

A Little Déjà Vu As Atlanta Mayoral Runoff Splits Voters

Dec 7, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Atlanta voters woke up to déjà vu Wednesday in the racially polarized contest to choose the city's next mayor, with one candidate laying claim to City Hall while the other vowed to seek a recount over a margin of just 759 votes.

The Tuesday runoff between Keisha Lance Bottoms, who is black, and Mary Norwood, who is white, split Atlanta practically in half after a vitriolic campaign punctuated by political grudges and allegations of corruption. Unofficial results showed Bottoms leading with 46,464 votes, or 50.41 percent, to Norwood's 45,705 votes, or 49.59 percent.

  •  Mayoral results in Atlanta could be finalized next week
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  •  KSU President Sam Olens faces mounting pressure to step down

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Keisha Lance Bottoms declares victory in a mayor’s race decided by fewer than 800 votes, but Mary Norwood wants a recount. Could the results be overturned? We’ll also look at whether the results of special legislative elections suggest a shifting balance of power under the Gold Dome. Plus, our panel weighs in on President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a move that may throw any chance for peace in the Middle East into chaos.

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

Atlanta has voted for a new mayor, but Tuesday's election still leaves questions about who she will be.

In an exceedingly close race, Keisha Lance Bottoms came out just 759 votes ahead of her opponent, Mary Norwood. Bottoms claimed victory early Wednesday morning, but Norwood isn't conceding. The race looks headed for a recount.

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