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ACLU Of Georgia Names Former DeKalb CEO Burrell Ellis Political Director

Dec 5, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

A former county leader whose convictions on corruption charges were tossed out by the state's highest court has been named political director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.

The organization on Monday announced that former DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis would fill the newly created position, which is meant to expand the organization's advocacy infrastructure and help push its public policy objectives.

  • Runoff Elections
  • Confederate Monument
  • Future of Plant Vogtle

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.

  • Election Day In Georgia
  • APS Modifies Dress Code
  • Atlanta Annexes Emory
  • PSC Analysts Recommend Killing Plant Vogtle Project

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

A recent survey from WalletHub lists Atlanta as the second best city to be single. What makes a city a strong place for dating?

How A Slip Of Paper Impacted An AIDS Diagnosis

Dec 5, 2017
StoryCorps

These days HIV can be diagnosed sooner and treated more effectively than when Christopher Harris got his diagnosis. When he contracted the disease, there was only one drug approved for treatment. Harris became an early member of the Atlanta Buyers Club, which distributed unapproved drugs to treat AIDS patients. We hear his story, courtesy of the NPR’s series, StoryCorps.

Diana Robinson / flickr

According to new FBI data released last month, there were more than 6,100 reported hate crimes in 2016, up by more than 270 from the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period.

  • Voters go to the polls to elect Atlanta's next mayor
  • Atlanta's Board of Education amends dress code policy after a petition
  • New study finds that the state hasn't done enough to combat the opioid crisis

GPB: Taylor Gantt

A new report by the FBI shows that violence against the LGBT community is on the rise.

The agency found that one out of every six hate crimes last year was based on sexual orientation.

And for transgender people living in the South, the statistics are even more grim.

According to the Human Right’s Campaign, 60 percent of violent incidents against transgender people happen in the South.

That includes four deaths this year in Georgia.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Atlanta has a new voter bloc that could sway the 2017 mayoral runoff election.

Keisha Lance Bottoms garnered 26 percent of votes on November 7, largely from the city's southern, African-American voters. Mary Norwood's 21 percent came mostly from the city's northern, white voters.

Kennesaw State University political scientist Kerwin Swint sat down with Rickey Bevington to explain why a significant group of East Atlanta voters are voting on economic policy rather than race or politics.

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," did President Donald Trump admit to obstructing justice on Twitter?  Also, the controversial Republican tax reform bill passes the Senate, but it does not include a measure that would have benefited Georgia-based Delta Air Lines. The Supreme Court gets set to hear the so-called “wedding cake” case. How will the ruling impact Georgia, a state that continues to flirt with passing a religious liberty statute and one that has a large LGBT community?

  • The Latest on The Atlanta Mayor's Race
  • The "DAWGS" Vie For The National Championship 
  • State Sen Rick Jeffares Resigns

NPR

If you want to pass out meals to homeless people in Atlanta, you'll now need a permit. City police have begun enforcing a decades-old policy requiring one to distribute food to homeless people. Those who don't comply face fines. We sit down to discuss this policy with Deidre Oakley, Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University, and George Chidi, Social Impact Director for Central Atlanta Progress.

Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk about politics from the pulpit with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia. And we discuss how taxes change behavior with Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

  • Atlanta Mayor's Race in Final Hours
  • UGA Heads to College Football Playoffs
  • Illegal Tire Dump in DeKalb State Park
  • Jeffares Resigns From State Senate

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Many sports are all about teamwork. But underwater hockey takes this to new heights. Or depths, rather, since all the action in underwater hockey is at the bottom of a pool. And because players can’t hold their breath forever, hogging the puck isn’t an option. GPB’s Emily Cureton took a dip with Atlanta’s underwater hockey club, the Swordfish. She brought back an audio postcard from a recent practice.

  • UGA advances to the College Football Playoff for the first time in school history
  • Atlanta's mayoral candidates prepare for tomorrow's election
  • Keisha Lance Bottoms receives support from senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris
  • 20 new Bitcoin ATM's are now operational throughout in Atlanta and Athens

Susa / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," we address the fallout from Michael Flynn’s guilty plea in the Russia probe and his cooperation with the special counsel’s investigation. He’s already pointing fingers at the White House transition team and, according to some, President Trump directly. Also, vulnerable Georgians may soon lose health care benefits that the federal government has long funded to help children, rural hospitals and major trauma centers like Grady. Will Congress act quickly to restore these programs?

Zoe Wangstrom / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joined host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included comedian Roy Wood, Jr. of "The Daily Show," former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, and Republican strategist Julianne Thompson

 

Zoe Wangstrom / On Second Thought

Sometimes the best way to make sense of what’s happening in the world is through comedy. For that, “The Daily Show” on Comedy Central has you covered. We chatted with comedian Roy Wood, Jr., who is a correspondent on the program. He is in Atlanta this weekend with performances at the Punchline Comedy Club.

Lingua Franca

We add two more songs to our Georgia Playlist. Mariah Parker, better known by her moniker Lingua Franca, is an Athens-based hip hop artist. She’s performs at The Bakery in Atlanta this Saturday, at The World Famous in Athens next Tuesday, and at Fresh Produce Records in Macon next Wednesday. Parker brings us tunes by Of Montreal and Andre 3000.

Sometimes the best way to make sense of what’s happening in the world is through comedy. And for that, “The Daily Show” on Comedy Central has you covered. We chat with comedian Roy Wood, Jr., who’s a correspondent for “The Daily Show.” He’s in Atlanta this weekend with performances at the Punchline Comedy Club.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo/File

Maybe there’s a voice-activated speaker like Amazon Echo or Google Home on your holiday shopping list. They’re handy for listening to music or setting alarms. The state of Georgia is connecting its website to the Echo’s Alexa operating system.

In today's headlines:

  • World AIDS Day 2017 brings more awareness to Atlanta's HIV problem
  • UGA and Auburn prepare to face off in Saturday's SEC championship game
  • Kamala Harris travels to Atlanta to support Mary Norwood in next week's mayoral election

Ann Marsden / The Splendid Table

Today on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to “The Splendid Table” host Lynne Rossetto Kasper ahead of her retirement. For more than two decades, Kasper has been unpacking the stories behind the food we eat for a weekly audience of about 725,000 listeners.

An investigative report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds about 12 percent of cops in Georgia schools were forced out of a previous job. The officers were terminated or investigated for a wide range of reasons, including chronically poor performance, lying to superiors, sexual misconduct and inappropriate use of force. But for some, jobs in the school system means a second chance for these troubled cops. We talk with Brad Schrade, reporter for the AJC.

In today's headlines:

  • Cathy Woolard endorses Mary Norwood in Atlanta's mayoral race
  • Several Georgia artists are nominated for the 2018 Grammy Awards
  • NSA leaker Reality Winner is denied bail

Ken Lund / Creative Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, does Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams have aspirations to run for president? Plus, if religious liberty is a key to winning the GOP gubernatorial primary, why is Brian Kemp backing away from a proposal that would allow adoptions to be denied on the basis of the sexual orientation of prospective parents? And, Atlanta mayoral candidates Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood square off in the GPB debate on the eve of new polling that shows the race is a dead heat.

Author Angie Thomas: TLC Saved My Life

Nov 29, 2017
Anissa Hidouk

Angie Thomas, author of the bestselling Young Adult book, "The Hate U Give," grew up a TLC fanatic. But after dealing with serious bullying, she used TLC’s music — specifically the late Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes's words — to support her.

 

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