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Today on “Political Rewind,” Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner testifies in a closed-door session with the Senate Intelligence Committee. No reporters were allowed, but in a prepared statement, Kushner asserted that he has not colluded with Russians. We discuss today's events and his planned appearance tomorrow with House Intelligence Committee another closed-door session. At least one observer opines that Kushner managed to throw Donald Trump Jr. under the bus in his prepared remarks.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP/Getty Images

Today on “Political Rewind,” the week ends with a bang! Sean Spicer, the long-beleaguered White House Press Secretary, abruptly resigns from his post. Was the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as the new White House Communications Director the reason for Spicer quitting?

Grant Blankenship / GPB

On average, scores released in the 2017 Georgia Milestones end of year test show incremental but positive improvement for schools across the state. Look past the big picture, though, and schools still have ground to make up. 

Take third grade literacy, largely held as one of the best predictors of future academic achievement. Third grade literacy ranged from being almost universal in some suburban schools to being largely absent elsewhere.

Courtesy Jan Smith Studios

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we go behind the scenes of the recording business and talk to the Atlanta vocal trainer who has nurtured the careers of some of the biggest artists in popular music.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the Senate fumbles on health care, but President Trump tries to recover. Will a lunchtime meeting put a bill back in play? Our panel looks at the latest iteration of the attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare and what it means for those of us who rely on medical insurance. Our panel voted to draft Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson, already lauded for his bipartisanship by the New York Times, to lead the way forward.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” if money talks, what do Casey Cagle's campaign contributions have to say? So far, a fair amount of his donations have come from lobbyists and political action groups. What will voters make of it?

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” will Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell prevail? At the moment, his version of the health care bill hangs by a thread. With Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) saying they'll vote "NO," McConnell can't afford to lose any more votes. And the full-court press is on with moderates who may be wavering. A vote is expected next week.

Langley / Public Domain

This week on “Two Way Street” we look at what’s being called the Great American Eclipse of 2017, with science writer David Baron.

Lauren Gerson / FLICKr/CC

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is out of the hospital after being treated for dehydration in Canada, a spokeswoman said Friday.

Richard Drew / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” who needs journalists? Donald Trump Jr. scoops everyone by releasing emails proving he met with a Russian attorney last summer during the presidential campaign.

Judge: Man Accused Of Threats To Rep. John Lewis’ Staff Is Competent

Jul 12, 2017

A man accused of threatening the staff of U.S. Rep. John Lewis has been deemed competent to stand trial.

A report from the warden at the Federal Medical Center in Lexington, Kentucky, indicates that Dante Antione Rosser is competent to stand trial and understands the nature of the legal proceedings, U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Baverman said Tuesday.

Baverman had ordered a mental health evaluation during a hearing in March.

Georgia state agencies have ramped up efforts to crack down on elder abuse, with law enforcement training and a tougher criminal code.

But an underlying anxiety exists among several officials who feel the issue will continue to plague at-risk Georgians until stricter protocols are put in place to track offenses, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Despite a new statewide focus on the issue, Georgia has no elder abuse registry, unlike Tennessee and New Hampshire, two leading states in addressing elder abuse.

Charles Tasnadi / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into the summer of ’72 and the botched burglary that eventually toppled a president. Bill Nigut and the AJC’s Jim Galloway spend the full hour with Richard Ben-Veniste, chief of the special prosecutor’s Watergate Task Force.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we have the first official face-to-face meeting of Trump and Putin. A conversation slotted for 30 minutes went longer than two hours, but what was truly accomplished? Set against the framework of a volatile G-20, we break down the conversation. 

Black Georgia Lawmakers Blast Trump Panel On Voting Fraud

Jul 6, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Black lawmakers in Georgia blasted President Donald Trump's election fraud commission for requesting extensive personal voter information Thursday, accusing the administration of trying to scare people away from voting.

Members of Georgia's Legislative Black Caucus, all Democrats in the General Assembly, said there's no logical reason the federal government would ask states for the information. They said releasing it would violate voters' privacy.

Chris Savas Photography

Alan Alda’s acting career has spanned six decades, starting with an appearance on “The Phil Silvers Show,” an early network TV comedy hit, way back in 1953. In the years since, he’s appeared in countless television shows, including “The West Wing,” “ER,” “30 Rock” and many more. He’s been a star on Broadway and in dozens of feature films. But Alda is probably always going to be best remembered for his portrayal of Hawkeye Pierce, on the beloved television series “M*A*S*H.” The show ran for 11 seasons, and the finale, in 1983, broke the record for the most-watched TV series in history at the time - 125 million viewers.

In recent years, newspapers and magazines have moved to all digital formats. But one magazine in Georgia is making a print comeback. This year Decatur-based Paste Magazine started a quarterly magazine that looks and feels different. The second edition just came out. We learn more about the magazine’s reboot with founder and editor-in-chief, Josh Jackson.

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” what happens next with the Senate health care bill? Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller joins us with the latest news on what the bill is looking like and how it might affect Georgians. In addition, there's news that Medicaid in Georgia is going to change regardless of what Congress comes up with. Miller provides some details.

PBS/CC

First up Alastair Bruce, historical advisor to “Downton Abbey” for five seasons. Bruce’s personal story is as interesting as any plot on the award-winning historical drama.

Despite a bad growing season, there were peaches for sale recently at a small stand at the Mulberry Farmer's Market in Macon, Ga. The fruit caught the eye of Linda Marlow, visiting from the West Coast.

"We're from California so we want Georgia peaches," Marlow said with a laugh.

California, by the way, produces more peaches than other state in the country. It isn't like this is a novelty for Marlow.

"Well yeah, but we expect they are going to be better here," Marlow said.

David Goldman / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” Gov. Nathan Deal weighs in on the health care debate and says he doesn't want states to get stuck with Medicaid costs. How does the congressional effort to replace Obamacare affect this piece of the puzzle?

massdistraction / Foter

A new law that will help fight the opioid crisis in Georgia will go into effect on July 1.

House Bill 249 was sent to the governor on April 7 after making it through the House with a vote of 164-9 and through the Senate with a vote of 50-0.

“The overall goal of passing the law is really to reduce prescription drug abuse and enhance patient safety,” said Dr. Steven Walsh, president of the Medical Association of Georgia.

Key Part Of Law To Help Child Sex Abuse Survivors To Expire

Jun 30, 2017
HiddenPredator.org

After suffering through sexual abuse for a decade starting when she was 5, a Georgia woman said she was too emotionally wrecked to sue her alleged abuser until it was too late — state law says victims must file lawsuits seeking damages before they turn 23.

Bryan Cox / ICE

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is supposed to release a new database to the public next week. It’s a collection of information on immigrants and foreign nationals in the state with criminal records.

Today on "Political Rewind," an impasse on health care, a donnybrook in the White House press room, as partisans wrestle in Washington, where does that leave the rest of us? Our panel talks about what it will take to get a health care bill accomplished.

slowking4 / Wikimedia Commons

Today on “Political Rewind,” during his presidential campaign, Donald Trump insisted he wanted to "drain the swamp" in Washington. But his own business dealings are causing their own set of issues. Alex Altman joins us to discuss his recent Time Magazine cover article, "The Swamp Hotel," which digs in on the Trump property in D.C. On Wednesday, Trump is planning to hold his first re-election fundraiser at the hotel; and criticism of this idea is mounting.

WHO

On September 9, 2014, a team of medical specialists guided Dr. Ian Crozier into the communicable disease isolation unit at Emory University Hospital. He had Ebola; in fact, he had the worst case of the disease that doctors in the United States had seen since the deadly Ebola epidemic began in Western Africa earlier that year.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Karen Handel is D.C. bound. What’s her new life going to be like on Capitol Hill? Our panel digs in on a quick recap of the 6th District race and what lies ahead for Democrats and Republicans in Georgia.

Watch Ole 'Bandit' Run: Fans Ride To Georgia For Film's 40th

Jun 23, 2017
Jack Plunkett / Invision/AP

They had a long way to go and a short time to get there, but hundreds of fans in Trans Ams have put the hammer down and made it to Atlanta to celebrate the 40th anniversary of "Smokey and the Bandit."

About 350 cars this week retraced actor Burt Reynolds' wild ride from the Texas-Arkansas line to Atlanta in the movie that roared into pop culture in 1977.

"Every town we drive through, people come out to film us, take pictures and wave as our convoy of cars comes through - it's like being in a huge parade," said organizer Dave Hall of Lincoln, Nebraska.

Today, we revisit our conversation with musician Kishi Bashi. He was raised in Virginia, but has lived in Athens since 2011 when he started playing with the band Of Montreal. We spoke to him just before his concert at the Variety Playhouse last fall. He is up for "Best Album of the Year" at the Flagpole Music Awards tonight in Athens.

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