Augusta

Ways to Connect

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnaped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are at the Georgia State Capitol for Governor Nathan Deal’s final State of the State address.  What are his plans for restoring economic vitality to rural Georgia communities?  What about expanded transit in metro Atlanta?  How will he cap his progressive reforms in the criminal justice system?  And, what does he see as his legacy accomplishments?  Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, House Speaker David Ralston and others stop by to react to the speech.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.

Panelists:

(Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

Tomorrow on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to astronaut Scott Kelly, who holds the American record for most consecutive days in space.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Khizr Khan joins us. When Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution out of his pocket and offered it to Donald Trump at last year’s Democratic Convention, he found himself thrust overnight in the national spotlight.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

Troubled $25 Billion Plant Vogtle Project Gets OK To Continue

Dec 21, 2017
November 2017
Georgia Power

Georgia's utility regulators are allowing construction to continue on two new nuclear reactors, despite massive cost overruns for the multi-billion-dollar project.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

AP Photo/John Bazemore

On this edition of Political Rewind: Georgia political leaders are examining the results of the Alabama senate race to determine whether there are lessons for how to run in 2018 races here. Our panel will look at what Alabama may teach us about elections next year.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

On today's episode of “Two Way Street,” we talk to Sugarland artist Kristian Bush. He and his musical partner, Jennifer Nettles, have been on hiatus since 2013 but recently announced that they will be getting back together for a 2018 tour. We talk to him about Sugarland’s long-anticipated reunion, but since this is a holiday show, we start by talking to Kristian about his passion for Christmas music.

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities?

Panelists:

Georgia Commission May Vote Next Week On Vogtle Reactors

Dec 12, 2017
AP Photo / John Bazemore

The state agency that regulates utilities could decide next week whether to complete two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle or cancel the project that's been plagued by delays and escalating costs.

Georgia Power estimates the reactors will cost $12.2 billion and won't be finished until 2021 and 2022. The new reactors on the Savannah River near Waynesboro were initially expected to cost the company about $6 billion and be completed this year.

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Alabama Senate race heads to the finish line, President Trump rallies voters to turn out for Roy Moore, while former President Obama, along with other key African-American leaders, rally in support of Doug Jones. Meanwhile, Alabama business leaders worry the election results could be yet another setback for the state’s efforts to compete with Georgia.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, two prominent Georgians push back against President Trump: FBI Director Chris Wray defends the honor of his agency in response to Trump's Twitter attacks, and Congressman John Lewis says he won't attend the opening of a Mississippi civil rights museum if Donald Trump shows up. Plus, will Al Franken's resignation from the U.S. Senate put more pressure on Republicans to speak out against those in their own party accused of sexual harassment? Georgia's own Newt Gingrich says no way.

We’re commemorating the 76th anniversary of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor this week by revisiting our conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Twomey. His book “Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack” is out now in paperback.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Keisha Lance Bottoms declares victory in a mayor’s race decided by fewer than 800 votes, but Mary Norwood wants a recount. Could the results be overturned? We’ll also look at whether the results of special legislative elections suggest a shifting balance of power under the Gold Dome. Plus, our panel weighs in on President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a move that may throw any chance for peace in the Middle East into chaos.

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," did President Donald Trump admit to obstructing justice on Twitter?  Also, the controversial Republican tax reform bill passes the Senate, but it does not include a measure that would have benefited Georgia-based Delta Air Lines. The Supreme Court gets set to hear the so-called “wedding cake” case. How will the ruling impact Georgia, a state that continues to flirt with passing a religious liberty statute and one that has a large LGBT community?

Susa / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," we address the fallout from Michael Flynn’s guilty plea in the Russia probe and his cooperation with the special counsel’s investigation. He’s already pointing fingers at the White House transition team and, according to some, President Trump directly. Also, vulnerable Georgians may soon lose health care benefits that the federal government has long funded to help children, rural hospitals and major trauma centers like Grady. Will Congress act quickly to restore these programs?

Ann Marsden / The Splendid Table

Today on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to “The Splendid Table” host Lynne Rossetto Kasper ahead of her retirement. For more than two decades, Kasper has been unpacking the stories behind the food we eat for a weekly audience of about 725,000 listeners.

Ken Lund / Creative Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, does Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams have aspirations to run for president? Plus, if religious liberty is a key to winning the GOP gubernatorial primary, why is Brian Kemp backing away from a proposal that would allow adoptions to be denied on the basis of the sexual orientation of prospective parents? And, Atlanta mayoral candidates Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood square off in the GPB debate on the eve of new polling that shows the race is a dead heat.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Senate GOP leaders are coming down to the wire in their efforts to pass the tax reform bill, but even as they scramble to find votes, a new report could make that task more difficult. Who are the winners and losers in the tax reform effort? Thanks to Senator Johnny Isakson, Delta Airlines could be a big winner.

 

Since the early 1970s, Atlanta has elected African-American mayors. That streak could be broken next week. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Curtis Wilkie, co-author of “The Road to Camelot, Inside JFK’s Five-Year Campaign,” which tells the story of his remarkable rise to the presidency.

Pages