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Martin Falbisoner / CC

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the same week that yet another Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare goes down in defeat, Congress faces crucial deadlines for existing programs that have a big impact on health care in Georgia. Charity hospitals could lose millions of dollars in federal financial aid. Federal funds to help pay for medical expenses for children from low-income families also face elimination. Will Congress act to save these programs?

Supreme Court Grants Temporary Stay Of Execution In Georgia

Sep 26, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

The U.S. Supreme Court granted a temporary stay of execution Tuesday night for a Georgia inmate whose attorneys argue that the 59-year-old black man's death sentence was tainted by a juror's racial bias.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, known as "Bo," was set to be put to death at 7 p.m. EDT at the state prison by injection of the barbiturate pentobarbital, but the hour came and went as the justices considered his case. Just before 11 p.m. EDT, the court announced the temporary stay.

Advocates Want More Police Training For Mental-Health Issues

Sep 26, 2017
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Supervisors for the Georgia Tech police officer who fatally shot a student thought the officer showed promise, but there is no evidence that he had received the kind of training that advocates say is crucial to effectively interact with people who have mental-health issues.

Officer Tyler Beck fatally shot Scout Schultz on Sept. 16, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation has said. Beck and other officers responded after Schultz called 911 to report an armed suspicious person, investigators said. Police have said Schultz had a knife and refused to drop it after repeated commands.

Georgia Plans To Execute Man Who Killed Sister-In-Law

Sep 26, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

A man who killed his sister-in-law 27 years ago is scheduled to die Tuesday as Georgia carries out its second execution of the year.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, 59 and known as "Bo," is set to be put to death at 7 p.m. at the state prison in Jackson by injection of the barbiturate pentobarbital. He was convicted of murder and two counts of kidnapping in the September 1990 slaying of Jaquelyn Freeman.

The State Board of Pardons and Paroles — the only authority in Georgia with the power to commute a death sentence — declined on Monday to spare his life.

Rounder Records

Before Gregg Allman passed away this summer, he recorded an album packed with new material. The posthumously released “Southern Blood” came out earlier this month. The heart-shattering album reflects on Allman's life as his terminal illness overtook him. We listen to the record and talk with Allman's longtime friend Chank Middleton and Allman's guitarist and band leader Scott Sharrard.

Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” the panel weighs in on the latest developments in the travel controversy engulfing HHS Secretary Tom Price. President Trump suggests he approves of an investigation looking into whether Price violated policy on the use of chartered aircraft by government officials. In the meantime, Price says he’ll only fly commercial while the investigation proceeds.

Lawyers Ask Panel To Spare Life Of Inmate Set For Execution

Sep 25, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

A Georgia prisoner scheduled for execution this week has spent the last 27 years regretting the decisions that led him to kill his sister-in-law as she was on her way to work with his estranged wife, his lawyers said in a clemency application.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, 59, is scheduled to be put to death Tuesday at the state prison in Jackson for the September 1990 shooting death of Jacquelyn Freeman.

Accused Leaker Asking Again For Pre-Trial Release From Jail

Sep 25, 2017
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Attorneys for a young woman accused of leaking a classified U.S. report want a judge to free her from jail pending trial, arguing prosecutors have added no new charges months after they warned the woman may have stolen additional secrets.

Reality Winner, a former Air Force linguist with a top secret security clearance, worked as a government contractor in Augusta until June, when she was charged with copying a classified report and mailing it to an online news organization.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the panel weighs in on Sen. John McCain’s announcement he’ll vote against the Graham-Cassidy health care bill and discusses whether the effort is now doomed. GOP leaders in the U.S. Senate are continuing their efforts to round up enough votes to pass the bill. The panel looks at the pressures being applied to Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski, whose vote could determine the success or failure of the measure. And the panel weighs in on the latest assessment of the impact the bill will likely make on the health care system.

Today on “Two Way Street,” Emily Saliers tells us about her first solo album, “Murmuration Nation.” 

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk to two Georgia mayors: Rusty Paul, the Republican mayor of Sandy Springs and Teresa Tomlinson, the Democratic mayor of Columbus. What problems do they share in common? Lack of modern infrastructure? A need for a better mix of transportation options? Affordable housing? Do they believe Georgia is on the right track for growth?

Georgia Wants To Execute Inmates Accused Of Killing Guards

Sep 19, 2017
Bob Andres / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool

Two inmates accused of killing their guards on a Georgia prison bus three months ago were indicted Tuesday on multiple charges, including murder, and the state plans to seek the death penalty.

A grand jury indicted Donnie Russell Rowe, 44, and Ricky Dubose, 24. Each man faces two counts of murder, two counts of felony murder, one count of escape and one count of hijacking a motor vehicle.

Ocmulgee Judicial Circuit District Attorney Stephen Bradley filed notice with the court Tuesday that he plans to seek the death penalty against both men.

3 People Charged With Inciting Riot After Georgia Tech Vigil

Sep 19, 2017
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Three people face charges of inciting a riot and battery of an officer after violent clashes with campus police at Georgia Tech following a vigil for a student fatally shot by officers, a university spokesman said Tuesday.

Police shot and killed Scout Schultz, 21, Saturday night after the student himself called 911 to report an armed and possibly intoxicated suspicious person, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said.

Georgia Tech hasn't identified the officer who fired the fatal shot and has refused to release any information about the officers who confronted Schultz.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” health care is back in the political headlines. Insurance companies are warning that rates are about to skyrocket – in part because of the uncertainty about how the Trump administration intends to support Obamacare. Tom Price is making dramatic cuts in money to help educate consumers on buying insurance from the exchanges, which critics say suppress registrations for insurance.

Meanwhile on Capitol Hill there’s a new GOP push to repeal and replace the ACA. Will it go anywhere?

GPB News

As the world comes to grips with the unprecedented damage of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, millions of Americans in the southeastern United States are working to rebuild their lives. Irma crossed into Georgia in the early morning hours of Monday, September 11, 2017. Over the next 24 hours, water inundated island and beach communities over 100 miles of coastline. Winds topping 69 miles per hour toppled trees and power lines. 1.1 million Georgians lost power and three lost their lives.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Governor Deal returns from a statewide inspection of damage from Hurricane Irma. He says the federal government has pledged support in the restoration effort. But how do requests for federal aid rub against conservative principles calling for a reduction in government spending? Our panel weighs in on the issue.

The B-52s made it big. And the iconic band from Athens takes the stage in their home state tonight, Sept. 15, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall. We revisit an interview with founding member Kate Pierson.

Hurricane Irma put a lot of lives on hold. But for Jacob Gmitter of Lakeland, Florida, there was one thing that just couldn’t wait. GPB reporter Grant Blankenship brings us the story of a young saxophonist on the road.

Today on “Two Way Street,” we revisit our conversation with author George Saunders. He spoke with us in March about his first full-length novel “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which takes place during the first 24-hours after Willie Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln’s 11-year old son, dies.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Power is slowly being restored in Macon following high winds from Hurricane Irma that knocked down trees and power poles. Many businesses opened up Wednesday for the first time.

Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we look at the damages that Irma wreaked on Georgia. Governor Nathan Deal joins us to discuss the areas of the state that are in the greatest need of help, where damage is greatest, and where the largest numbers of people have been displaced. What does the governor expect the federal government will do for the state? How quickly will recovery money flow from Washington to Georgia?

J. Cindy Hill / GPB News

On Monday, September 11, Tybee Island experienced storm surge flooding from Hurricane Irma. This excess water along with an astronomical high tide flooded parts of the island. We spoke with Mayor Jason Buelterman just after the only bridge connecting Tybee to the mainland opened the following afternoon.

GPB: Describe what you’re seeing on the island.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Two of Macon's five Red Cross Shelters closed Tuesday. By the afternoon there were less than 400 people staying in them. Chelsea McKinley and her family have been in Macon nearly a week. She said their home in Homestead, Florida is in good shape but she's worried about people in the Keys where she grew up.

"I have a lot of friends in the Keys. I grew up there. My mom, she has an apartment there too. So, it's a lot of trees knocked down," she said. "There's actually a restaurant called Snappers and it's completely torn down from what I see on the news."

After Irma, Florida's Evacuees Contemplate Return Trip

Sep 12, 2017
Bill Barrow / AP Photo

Thanks to reconnaissance by a neighbor who stayed behind, Pam Szymanksi knows Hurricane Irma blew out the living room window of her southwest Florida home, but she isn't sure when she'll get to see the damage for herself.

"All I know is we have to check out of here tomorrow, because they're booked," she said Monday, sitting in the lobby of a downtown Atlanta hotel where she arrived with her mother, two children and two dogs. A hotel reservation in Valdosta, Georgia, is next, Szymanksi said, but that's still 350 miles from their home in Fort Myers.

Irma Kills 3 In South Carolina And 2 In Georgia

Sep 12, 2017
Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

The remnants of Hurricane Irma forced Atlanta's international airport - the world's busiest passenger airport - to cancel nearly 200 flights early Tuesday. The storm also claimed three lives in South Carolina and two in Georgia.

Hurricane Irma has made landfall, and is working its way up our state. The remnants of Irma were downgraded to a tropical storm, but that storm remains a major threat. We checked in with National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Nadler and GPB reporter Emily Jones.

Author Greg Iles has sold millions of books. He’s written 15 novels, 12 of which have been New York Times best sellers. His latest novel is “Mississippi Blood” -- the final installment of a trilogy that he began eight years ago. We revisited our conversation with Greg Iles from back in March.

Irma: Recovery Continues; 158k Without Power In Georgia

Sep 11, 2017

Irma: Real-Time Updates

Sep 11, 2017
NOAA

Follow along for up-to-the-minute coverage of Hurricane Irma.

Irma Prompts 1st Ever Tropical Storm Warning For Atlanta

Sep 11, 2017
Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

Widespread threats from Hurricane Irma prompted Georgia's governor to declare an emergency Sunday for the entire state, where coastal Savannah was evacuated for the second time in less than a year and Atlanta faced its first-ever tropical storm warning.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

Irma, once a powerful and longrunning hurricane, weakened to a tropical depression as it moved through Georgia on its way to Alabama. It continues to dump heavy rain but all surge warnings have been canceled.

Irma has left behind dangerous floodwaters, power outages for millions of people and the debris it has made of human possessions across Florida.

The huge storm remained a Category 1 hurricane through early Monday, before finally being downgraded to a tropical storm and then a tropical depression.

NOAA

On this edition of “Political Rewind,” our panel discusses how Georgia braces for Hurricane Irma. Will the state’s new emergency management team be up to the challenge?

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