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On this edition of "Political Rewind," "Hardball" host Chris Matthews joins us to discuss his new book, which offers fresh insights on the life of Robert Kennedy.  Matthews sees Kennedy as a shining example of the kind, moral leader he thinks is absent from the political scene today. Also, we’ll look at the latest developments in Alabama and in Washington in the ongoing Roy Moore controversy. Despite increasing pressure, Moore seems determined to say in the race. Plus, Hillary Clinton tells a packed house in Atlanta that Trump fever has broken and the tide is turning.


The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore fights back against allegations he once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Response to the explosive report is further splitting the GOP. Also, Tom Price is out as Health and Human Services Secretary, but an investigation into his use of luxury private jets and the leaks that led to his ouster continue to rock the department. Plus, two former mayors of Atlanta weigh in on the dynamics of the runoff mayoral contest. They contend that city hall corruption will be an issue, as will race.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills has spent his career taking a close look at the Roman Catholic Church. But for all that thinking about religion, he had never read the Qur’an until recently. What he learned about Islam is the subject of his new book, “What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters,” and this episode of “Two Way Street.” 

Mayor Keisha? Ethnic Names No Obstacle For Black Candidates

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta's next mayor could be a black woman named Keisha — a prospect that thrills Diamond Harris.

The 28-year-old graphic designer exulted Wednesday on her Facebook page: "Keisha, Keisha, Keisha! I just want a mayor name Keisha."

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," Democrats finally have something to cheer about, chalking up important victories in Virginia and New Jersey while, in Georgia, Dems cut into the dominant GOP majority in the legislatures. The Atlanta mayor’s race heads into a runoff and once again city voters are confronted by a contest divided on racial lines.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

Slaying That Haunted Family For Decades Now Linked To Racism

Nov 6, 2017
Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

When 23-year-old Timothy Coggins was found dead and disfigured beside a Georgia highway in 1983, the young black man's family and neighbors whispered that his killing may be linked to racism.

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," after rolling out their long-awaited tax reform plan, House GOP leaders are already facing resistance from their own ranks, and Democrats are pushing back hard. Also, a new eyewitness report indicates that Jeff Sessions was more aware of efforts to connect the Trump campaign to Russia than he’s admitted. Now Democrats want him to explain himself.