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On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

Relatives: Zell Miller No Longer Making Public Appearances

Oct 18, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Relatives of Zell Miller say he will no longer make public appearances as he deals with health challenges.

The 85-year-old former Georgia governor and U.S. senator took a fall at a Young Harris College basketball game in February 2016.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that tests at a hospital later found proteins associated with Parkinson's with Lewy bodies — a form of the disease associated with dementia.

His grandson Bryan Miller said he is experiencing "the cognitive symptoms that are associated with this type of Parkinson's."

Guilty Plea But No Jail For Jewel Thief Doris Payne, 87

Oct 18, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

A notorious jewel thief recently arrested at a Georgia Walmart store got no jail time during her latest court appearance.

Doris Payne, at 87, has stolen about $2 million in jewels over the last six decades. She was arrested July 17 for a misdemeanor shoplifting charge after a Walmart employee said she tried to leave the suburban Atlanta store with items she hadn't paid for.

Emily Jones / GPB News

As debate flares over Confederate monuments around the country, one church in coastal South Carolina is building a memorial to Harriet Tubman. A model was unveiled Tuesday.

Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

The student who wears the owl mascot costume at a Georgia public university where five cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem had no business leading a cross-campus march in support of the cheerleaders, an influential lawmaker said.

Kenneth Sturkey, who dresses as Scrappy the Owl at Kennesaw State University athletic events, said he donned the costume without permission for Monday's rally on behalf of cheerleaders who knelt at a game Sept. 30 to protest racial inequality.

“Dear Martin,” a new novel by Atlanta author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color, through the eyes of a teenage boy. 

"I really wrote it for my sons, they’re one and five…  And eventually, in 10 years, there are still going to be people who look at my sons and see a threat, instead of a kid. And I want them to be able to navigate this world that we live in,” says Stone. 

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On today's "Political Rewind," we take a closer look at just what President Trump’s executive orders on health care really mean for assuring quality insurance coverage. Who are the winners and losers in the deal? How will it affect Georgians? Andy Miller of "Georgia Health News" helps illuminate the issues.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Delta Airlines CEO Edward Bastain is bristling at a few Trump administration policies that he says will hurt the company. It’s the first time the company has expressed deep concern with the president. Our panel talks about the friction.

Then: negotiations on a new NAFTA agreement break down, Georgia farmers could pay a steep price for failure to strike a deal. How much will tariffs hurt agriculture exports, especially in the North Georgia poultry industry?

Columbus Ends Fees For People Who Drop Abuse Allegations

Oct 13, 2017
Peter / Flickr/CC

The city of Columbus, Georgia has agreed to stop making alleged victims in domestic violence cases pay fees when they decline to participate in prosecutions.

The city also agreed to repay $41,844 in fees and damages for the 101 people it charged when they decided not to press charges against their alleged abusers.

Federal Judge Clay Land approved these terms in a class action settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Center for Human Rights in October 2016 against the city of Columbus, a local judge and several law enforcement officers.

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

Parents of disabled students and a group of advocates say in a federal lawsuit that Georgia schools have put thousands of children into a separate program and failed to give them an adequate education.

The Georgia Advocacy Office and other groups said in a statement that they filed the lawsuit this week in the northern district of Georgia's federal courts.

The complaint alleges that the students have been segregated into a program known as the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support, or GNETS.

On this edition of Political Rewind, will Georgia legislators proceed with plans to expand gun rights in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre?  We’re getting our first clues now.  Plus, new signals that state GOP leaders may be dropping their longtime resistance to investing in public transit.

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel looks at the issues that emerged in the debates among GOP candidates for governor of Georgia, which took place in Milledgeville and Augusta over the weekend of October 7 and 8. All of them endorsed a religious liberty bill, and turned thumbs down to legalizing casino gambling. How will those positions play with voters?

Today on “Political Rewind,” Georgia congressman John Lewis once again is leading the Democratic charge to pass new gun laws; and now Republican leaders on the hill are signaling that they might support a restriction on the device that turned Stephen Paddock’s weapons into mass killing machines in Las Vegas. Critics say the GOP is making only a token gesture.

Plus: we’ll ask former Georgia congressman Buddy Darden to give us a lesson in how voters here have responded to past gun control over the last few decades.

Daren Wang has made a career out of his love for literature. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival was his idea, and after 12 years as its executive director, he resigned this fall. Before that, he worked on public radio shows that celebrated literary luminaries. This August, Wang stepped into a new role: author. 

Georgia's Win List

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre, both Democratic candidates for governor say they support action to curb gun abuses. How will that play with conservative Georgia voters?

Then, we look at the first face-off between those candidates, Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, which took place at the Carter Center Monday night.

Dem Candidates For Governor Spar Over Education, Protests

Oct 3, 2017
Georgia's Win List

Georgia's Democratic hopefuls for governor sparred Monday over who is the better advocate for public education, while rehashing the details of a national liberal conference this summer where activists booed one of the candidates off the stage.

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