Black Lives Matter

Emails: Protests Spur College Officials To Talk With Players

Oct 20, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

As protests over racial injustice grab national attention in pro sports, some college and university officials are having pre-emptive talks with student-athletes and consulting each other amid concerns that such actions will spread to college sports, according to emails released Thursday.

After five black cheerleaders at Kennesaw State University knelt during the national anthem at a September football game, athletic officials there sought advice from their counterparts at schools including the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Duke University and Purdue University.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Three years ago, Ferguson, Missouri, exploded into national headlines when an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, was shot and killed by the police. Protests erupted in many cities, including Atlanta. Now, Charlottesville is the latest example of the nation’s heightened racial tensions and growing white supremacy groups. We talked with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Wesley Lowery, who covers race and justice for The Washington Post.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

It's been almost four years since Patrisse Khan-Cullors helped birth the hashtag #blacklivesmatter. Those three words gained national attention for demonstrations against police brutality and grew into a movement.

But progress has been slow, admits Khan-Cullors, a Los Angeles-based activist who co-founded the Black Lives Matter Network.

Riot police descended in downtown Portland, Ore., Sunday to bring calm among thousands of demonstrators who converged for competing rallies in the wake of the racially charged stabbing that claimed the lives of two men.

When the story of Atlanta's turn-of-the-millennium sonic boom is told 100 years from now, Organized Noize — the production trio of Ray Murray, Sleepy Brown and Rico Wade — will be the sound architects credited with putting the Dirty South on the map.

The Justice Department decided not to charge the officers involved last July in the fatal shooting of a black man, Alton Sterling.

The decision is being met with anger by activists who say prosecutors are too deferential toward cops — and are too quick to let them off. That notion has been front and center since the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Mo., that followed the death of Michael Brown.

It's been five years since the death of Trayvon Martin — and the outrage that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

Martin — 17 years old, black and unarmed — was shot by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

PBS

The new PBS documentary "Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise," explores the many twists and turns of the civil rights movement over the last 50 years. The four-part series airs November 15 and 22 at 8 p.m. on PBS.

The documentary ends with the current struggles highlighted by the Black Lives Matter movement. To talk about those issues, Georgia Public Broadcasting hosted a panel discussion with three experts and leaders in the African-American community in Atlanta. 

The idea of black capitalism goes back many decades. Civil rights activists Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey advocated African-Americans creating and doing business with their own to build wealth in their community.

This summer, the killings of black men and the Black Lives Matter movement rekindled campaigns to #BuyBlack and #BankBlack — but it's a call some supporters find difficult to heed.

As Hillary Clinton began a meeting with police chiefs from departments around the country, she expressed gratitude to those on the force.

"They represent officers who get up every day, put on their uniforms, kiss their families goodbye and risk their lives on behalf of our communities," the Democratic nominee said at the Thursday gathering in New York City.

It was two years ago this week that a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., in a case that became an inflection point in the way Americans talk about race and policing.

Editor's Note: This piece contains language that some readers may find offensive.

It was a hot day in Cleveland at the height of the Republican National Convention and Stevedore Crawford Jr. was angry. He stomped through the city sweating through his white T-shirt, stopping at corners to denounce police. Right next to him was his young daughter, wearing the same camouflage pants as her dad. She also wore the same white T-shirt, scrawled with Tamir Rice's name.

Tamir was a 12-year-old boy killed by Cleveland police in November 2014.

@LUCYMCBATH

In 2011, unarmed African American teen Jordan Davis was murdered in his car by Michael Dunn after a dispute over loud music. Davis was from Atlanta and his death ignited a national debate about racism and gun violence. Davis’s mother, Lucia McBath, spoke at the Democratic National Convention about her son’s death as an advocate for ‘Mothers of the Movement.’ Filmmaker Marc Silver produced a film entitled “3 ½ Minutes: 10 Bullets,” which chronicles the tragic death of Jordan Davis.

@ATLisReady

Police shootings of unarmed African American men have sparked protests across the country, including in Atlanta. The protests in the city have been peaceful for the most part. But recent violence against police in Baton Rouge and Dallas have raised questions about the capacity of law enforcement officers to serve as both public servants and defenders of the peace. 

We talk with The Atlanta-Journal Constitution columnist Bill Torpy about why he thinks the way officers handle protests in Atlanta work. 

A Generational Divide In Civil Rights Activism?

Jul 18, 2016
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Today, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Police Chief George Turner will meet with Black Lives Matter activists. 

Reed and Turner agreed to the meeting last week, after days of protests where demonstrators clogged streets and tried to block the interstate: strategies that aren’t always well-received by veterans of the Civil Rights Movement and expose a generational divide within the movement.

Black Lives Matter Protesters Rally At Governor's Mansion

Jul 12, 2016
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Monday meant another night of protests in Atlanta, as hundreds of demonstrators outraged by recent police killings of black men held a sit-in outside the governor's mansion.

After gathering at the Lenox MARTA station, the protesters blocked a road near Lenox Square mall before marching to the mansion amid chants of "justice" and "black lives matter."

Trevor Young / GPB

It's been a long day at Stone Mountain Park, where hundreds of protestors showed up to counter a Confederate rally being held there. 

The conflict started mid-morning as groups like Rise Up Georgia surrounded the park, leaving their cars blocking the main entrance. 

A long line of stopped vehicles kept park-goers from getting anywhere near the entrance, as Rise Up protestors demonstrated with chants and signs by the ticket counters. After about an hour, they returned to their cars to enter the park.