Incirlik Air Base

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta save lives and eradicate sicknesses, but the CDC is also in show business. In its more than 70-year history, it’s captured the imagination of TV writers and filmmakers. So, could the monkey in the movie Outbreak actually spread disease? Could flesh-eating zombies like the ones in The Walking Dead actually be a reality? On Monday night, the Atlanta Science Festival separates fact from fiction.

Daniel Mayer / Wikimedia Commons

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has seen plenty of turmoil over the past week -- Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned over financial conflicts of interest, and impending budget cuts are forcing the agency to drastically cut its overseas programs. What does all of this mean for the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked first with Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the CDC. He’s now the President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives, a global health initiative of Vital Strategies. Later in the show we were joined by Andy Miller, editor and CEO of Georgia Health News.

A week ago, Brenda Fitzgerald resigned as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The revelation she holds financial stakes in a tobacco company -- and thus has a major conflict of interest -- comes as the CDC faces enormous budget cuts. The agency is preparing to downsize its global epidemic prevention programs by about 80 percent. Should we be worried about the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked with former CDC director Tom Frieden and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.

Raed Mansour CDC

On this edition of Political Rewind, another Georgian resigns from a high-level position in the Trump Administration.  We’ll discuss why the head of the CDC is out.  Also, Georgians respond to President Trump’s State of the Union speech.  Plus, we’ll look at news from the governor’s race: Stacey Evans wins a big endorsement and GOP candidates look to show fundraising muscle to compete with Casey Cagle as they face today’s disclosure deadline.


AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

  • Fitzgerald Out As CDC Head
  • Georgia Power Customers To See Smaller Bills
  • UGA Football Ticket Prices Going Up  

Melissa Golden for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, has resigned amid questions over her investments in tobacco and pharmaceutical companies.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

On this edition of Political Rewind: President Trump has been in office for less than one year, but Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne is already looking at the long term impact the Trump presidency will have on American democracy–for good and for ill.

New CDC Director Questioned About Financial Conflicts

Dec 12, 2017
David Tulis / AP Photo/File

A U.S. Senator is criticizing the director of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for an apparent financial conflict of interest that the senator says may prevent the director from doing her job.

Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald became director of the Atlanta-based CDC in July, and was required to sell a range of stocks she owned, including beer and soda companies, the tobacco company Philip Morris International, and a number of health care companies such as vaccine manufacturers and health-care companies.

Atlanta Adds Emory, CDC In Largest Expansion Since 1952

Dec 5, 2017
Nrbelex / Wikimedia Commons

The city of Atlanta has completed its largest annexation in more than a half-century, absorbing Emory University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that the Atlanta City Council's 13-0 vote Monday adds 744 acres (301 hectares) to the city's eastern edge and represents the most significant annexation since Buckhead's addition in 1952.

Updated at 2:50 p.m. ET

President Trump declared a public health emergency to deal with the opioid epidemic Thursday, freeing up some resources for treatment. More than 140 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"We are currently dealing with the worst drug crisis in American history," Trump said, adding, "it's just been so long in the making. Addressing it will require all of our effort."

"We can be the generation that ends the opioid epidemic," he said.