Charlottesville

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

A day after meeting with Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., to discuss improving race relations, policy issues of specific concern to communities of color and Scott's pointed criticism of President Trump after his comments in response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Trump is standing by those remarks.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., met with President Trump at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the president's response to last month's protests and racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as specific issues facing communities of color.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka has a tough assessment of what it's been like trying to work with the White House on manufacturing, trade and other issues that helped lure many union members to vote for President Trump in November.

Speaking at a breakfast event in Washington, D.C., Wednesday hosted by the Christian Science Monitor, Trumka said any hopes for progress ran up against another ugly reality at the White House: warring factions within the West Wing, battling for influence with the president.

Joshua L. Jones / Athens Banner-Herald

Following the recent events in Charlottesville, a national debate has been raging over what should be done with Confederate symbols across the South. In Athens, and across Georgia, many monuments and markers dedicated to Confederate soldiers persist in daily life.

Georgia Man Charged In Charlottesville Beating Arrested

Aug 29, 2017
Monroe County Sheriff's Office

A man charged in connection with the beating of a black man in Charlottesville, Virginia, on the day of a white nationalist rally has been arrested, authorities in Georgia said.

Alex Michael Ramos, 33, turned himself in Monday evening to the Monroe County Sheriff's Office, Sgt. Lawson Bittick told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Three years ago, Ferguson, Missouri, exploded into national headlines when an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, was shot and killed by the police. Protests erupted in many cities, including Atlanta. Now, Charlottesville is the latest example of the nation’s heightened racial tensions and growing white supremacy groups. We talked with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Wesley Lowery, who covers race and justice for The Washington Post.

Democrats have spent the past two weeks condemning President Trump over his initial equivocating response to racist violence in Charlottesville, Va.

The question is, what to do next: keep up broad critiques of Trump's leadership, or focus on narrower goals, like the removal of public monuments honoring Confederate leaders?

Self-described white nationalist Christopher Cantwell, who became a public face of the now-infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlotteville, Va., was denied bond Thursday at the Albemarle County General District Court, said University of Virginia Police.

The city of Charlottesville has shrouded two of its Confederate monuments in a show of mourning for the woman killed in the violent white nationalist protest there earlier this month.

Following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Silicon Valley tech firms removed far-right groups from search results, cut off their websites and choked their ability to raise money online.

The moves have leaders on the far-right calling for the government to step in and regulate these companies. They have some strange bedfellows in this — many liberals also are calling for more regulation of the same companies.

On the far-right is Richard Spencer. He is a white supremacist.

Foter

The South is a proud place. Southerners are notorious for their love of their heritage and culture. But following the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, it’s becoming more difficult to separate the South from its roots in racism and white supremacy.

The recent violence in Charlottesville, Va., amplified an ongoing struggle in America about who experiences discrimination and to what extent. Many of the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, for example, feel that white people are discriminated against as much as, or more than, minority groups.

As we struggled this week to make sense of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., some big questions bubbled up:

What lessons does history teach about white resentment in the United States? How is the experience of other countries and other times — like Germany — relevant? How are those in power reacting to President Trump's shifting response?

Updated at 4:59 p.m. ET

President Trump stood by his heavily criticized defense of monuments commemorating the Confederacy in a series of tweets Thursday morning. Trump said removing the statues of Confederate generals meant removing "beauty" — that would "never able to be comparably replaced" — from American cities. As he did in a Tuesday press conference, he also attempted to equate some Confederate generals with some of the Founding Fathers.

Strung together, the tweets read:

Thousands of people quietly amassed on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville on Wednesday night for an unannounced candlelight vigil.

A soft glow illuminated the Rotunda – the iconic historic building at the heart of the university.

After a dark week in the city, it was a peaceful protest intended to counter a weekend of deadly violence sparked by a white supremacist rally.

Jared Taylor was not in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. But Taylor, one of the leading voices for white rights in the country, says it was clear what really happened at that rally.

Shortly after President Trump posted a link for tickets to a rally in Phoenix, the city's mayor issued a statement asking the president not to come, saying, "our nation is still healing from the tragic events in Charlottesville."

Mayor Greg Stanton continued, "If President Trump is coming to Phoenix to announce a pardon for former Sheriff Joe Arpaio, then it will be clear that his true intent is to enflame emotions and further divide our nation."

Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — high-ranking military officials who advise the president — appeared to distance themselves from President Trump by publicly condemning racism in the aftermath of Trump's comments about the attack in Charlottesville.

Trump has blamed "both sides" for the violence.

A majority of Americans think President Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was "not strong enough," according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Fifty-two percent of respondents said so, as compared with just over a quarter (27 percent) who thought it was strong enough.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind” we look at the fallout over the past five days from the violent confrontations in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

President Trump is not the only world leader facing criticism for a delayed condemnation of Saturday's white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Va.

For three days, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — an outspoken critic of anti-Semitism around the world — said nothing about the anti-Jewish chants and Nazi swastikas paraded in Charlottesville.

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump declared Wednesday he is disbanding two economic advisory panels, after a growing number of the corporate CEO's who sat on them decided to leave, in the wake of Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Trump said in a tweet that he is ending the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative and the Strategic and Policy Forum "rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople" that made up those groups.

Steve Helber / The Associated Press

Rallies in Charlottesville over the weekend brought together many factions of the white supremacist movement, and put a younger generation of white supremacists in the spotlight. Reporter A.C. Thompson has been tracking hate groups for ProPublica’s “Documenting Hate” project.

President Trump roiled opinion Tuesday by reversing himself and reiterating his claim that "both sides" of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., were to blame for violence that killed one woman and left many injured.

Trump made the remarks at a news conference at Trump Tower in New York, engaging in back-and-forth exchanges with reporters about what transpired in Charlottesville over the weekend.

The events that unfolded in Charlottesville last weekend are a stark reminder of how far we haven't come as a nation. Like so many Americans, I am horrified that white supremacist and neo-Nazi adherents have recently found sanction to put hateful ideologies more overtly on display.

Seeing images of torch-bearers one day and heavily-armed men as would-be militias the next, it's unsurprising that violence erupted, leading to injuries and death.

At a theater in Charlottesville, Va., the mother of Heather Heyer issued a rallying cry.

"They tried to kill my child to shut her up," Susan Bro said. "Well, guess what. You just magnified her."

She invoked her daughter's famous Facebook post — "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."

To walk around Berlin is to constantly, inevitably, trip over history.

Almost literally, in the case of the Stolpersteine, or "stumbling stones," embedded in the sidewalks outside homes where victims of the Holocaust once lived.

Germany's culture of "remembrance" around the Nazi years and the Holocaust is a well-documented and essential part of the nation's character. Though occasionally political parties may challenge it, those elements have thus far remained thoroughly fringe.

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