Civil Rights Movement

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The 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education made segregation of America’s public schools illegal. But decades before Thurgood Marshall argued for Linda Brown's right to attend the all-white school closest to her house in Topeka, Kansas, lawsuits brought by little girls and young women chipped away at the foundations of segregated education. New research finds their grassroots efforts paved the way for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) legal battle to integrate schools nationally.


Image from the website of the Norman Rockwell Museum

The 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education made segregation of America’s public schools illegal. But decades before Thurgood Marshall argued for Linda Brown's right to attend the all-white school closest to her house in Topeka, Kansas, lawsuits brought by little girls and young women chipped away at the foundations of segregated education. New research finds their grassroots efforts paved the way for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) legal battle to integrate schools nationally. 

 


Some Georgia law schools want to appeal to more than their traditional law school students. In the fall, the University of Georgia begins offering a graduate degree program for non-lawyers. As schools broaden the appeal of the law, there is major concern about Georgia’s lawyer shortage, particularly in rural areas. We have seen a number of companies form that offer online legal services, but are these viable alternatives?

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. Brown's departure comes amid what another outgoing editor called a "transformation" of the newspaper. Brown joined us in the studio to discuss the way local news is changing and reflect on his longtime career covering the news in middle Georgia. 

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a leader in South Africa's anti-apartheid movement and ex-wife of the late Nelson Mandela, died Monday. She was 81. On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen, who grew up in South Africa, spoke with host Adam Ragusea about Madikizela-Mandela's integral role in the fight against apartheid. Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe, CEO of the TutuDesk Campaign and daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, also joined from South Carolina. Tutu-Gxashe earned her master's degree from Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.

AP Photo/Henry Griffin

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Bill Nigut talks with Ambassador Andrew Young, as they commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

Young was one of Dr. King’s chief lieutenants throughout  the Civil Rights Movement, and he was with King the evening he was shot to death at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis.

National Park Service

April 4, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King Jr. Today, we paid tribute to King's legacy by talking to the people who knew him, portrayed him and were inspired by him. 

Associated Press

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee.

So, in the last 50 years, how has the civil rights movement evolved, and where is it headed?

LaRaven Taylor / GPB

The 1999 Disney made-for-television movie, “Selma, Lord, Selma,” explores Martin Luther King Jr.'s later years in Selma, Alabama.

The movie is told through the eyes of an 11-year-old inspired by King's determination in the fight for equal rights.

LaRaven Taylor / GPB

Civil rights icon Xernona Clayton was both the organizer of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and a close advisor to Martin Luther King Jr.

She sat down with On Second Thought for a conversation about how King would feel about today's civil rights movements.

AP Photo/David Goldman

In August 1967, Martin Luther King Jr. spoke in Atlanta at the annual convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Less than a year later, he was killed in Memphis, Tennessee. We talked with Xernona Clayton, an advisor to King and one of the conference planners.

Wikipedia

In this rare 1961 interview with Martin Luther King Jr., King spoke with Eleanor Fischer, a reporter with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation who later worked for National Public Radio.

In the interview, King reflects on childhood run-ins with racial prejudice in Atlanta.

This interview was uncovered by archivist Andy Lanset and the WNYC archives. 

Interview Highlights: 

Eleanor Fischer: We're you aware of racial prejudices while growing up in Atlanta?

Normally when you think of cherry blossoms, you think of Washington D.C. or Japan. But unbeknownst to a lot of tourists, Macon, Georgia is the Cherry Blossom Capital of the World. William A. Fickling Sr. discovered the distinctive blooms in his backyard in 1949.

Erik Voss

For Women’s History Month, On Second Thought is paying tribute to Georgia's female trailblazers. 

Civil Rights icon Dr. Roslyn Pope made history in 1960 when, as a student at Spelman College, she wrote “An Appeal for Human Rights." The document was instrumental in advancing the Atlanta Student Movement's efforts to end segregation.

On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen spoke with Pope about her experiences as a student leader in the Civil Rights Movement. 

The GOP tax bill has many concerned the law will negatively impact the middle class while bolstering the rich. But a new study from the union Actors Equity finds another problem: the tax bill could also harm Georgia’s film industry. They looked at how the plan might reduce deductions and reimbursements for contractors and part-time film workers. We talk about this with Chris Joyner with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution -- he writes the AJC Watchdog column. Also Craig Miller, Film Producer and Founder of Craig Miller Productions.

Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

First, one of the first African-American elementary schools in Atlanta was recently slated for destruction. But after outcry a piece of the structure was saved, to become part of a new YMCA center in Vine City. This is just one fight in a perennial battle over historic preservation. A recent National Trust for Historic Preservation study says Atlanta has a  teardown culture -- worse than just about about any other major American city. We talk about this with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center. And with Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Photo Courtesy of Karcheik Sims-Alvarado

There’s no doubt Atlanta played a big role in the civil rights movement. Now, that history is archived in a new photo book called “Atlanta and the Civil Rights Movement, 1944 -1968.” We talk with historian Karcheik Sims-Alvarado about the significance of these photographs.

Dr. Sims-Alvarado will appear at the Atlanta History Center Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m.

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