civil war

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the U.S. Senate shoots down Senator David Perdue’s plan to dramatically curtail legal immigration and it fails to find common ground on any immigration reform measure.  

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

Georgia’s legislative session begins January 8, 2018. But a bill addressing the debate over Confederate monuments has already been filed by Decatur’s State Representative, Mary Margaret Oliver. The bill would allow local governments to decide whether or not to keep or remove monuments.

Thomas Hicks was once a local hero in the small mining community of McCaysville, Georgia. He was the town doctor who made middle-of-the-night house calls. But Hicks had a terrible secret, one still reverberating today. From 1950 to 1965, he sold more than two hundred babies on the black market. Some parents knew, others were told their children had died. These children are now fully grown adults, still known as the “Hicks Babies.” We talk to Melinda Dawson and Kriste Hughes about their search for birth parents. 

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the upcoming implosion of the Georgia Dome and the indictment of Paul Manafort. We also talk about one school’s Civil War reenactment, why some of us are not getting enough sleep, and the allegations of sexual assault against Kevin Spacey. Joining us this week are Tomika DePriest, Ed Sohn, Simon Bloom, and London Brown.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

During an interview Monday night on Fox News, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said that "the lack of the ability to compromise led to the Civil War."

His comment was swiftly countered by confounded observers, who pointed out that the Civil War was fought over slavery and that compromising on slavery would be morally unconscionable — and that the country did strike such compromises for decades and they did not, in fact, prevent war.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

School officials say there will be no more Civil War-related student dress-up activities at a Georgia elementary school after its "Civil War Day" sparked conflict among students, parents and others.

Big Shanty Elementary School last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the war.

The mother of a 10-year-old black child says a white student dressed as a plantation owner approached him and said, "You are my slave."

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state Superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture. We talk with Ty Tagami of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also Dana Rickman, Director of Policy and Research with the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education.