civil war

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

Georgia’s legislative session begins January 8, 2018. But a bill addressing the debate over Confederate monuments has already been filed by Decatur’s State Representative, Mary Margaret Oliver. The bill would allow local governments to decide whether or not to keep or remove monuments.

Thomas Hicks was once a local hero in the small mining community of McCaysville, Georgia. He was the town doctor who made middle-of-the-night house calls. But Hicks had a terrible secret, one still reverberating today. From 1950 to 1965, he sold more than two hundred babies on the black market. Some parents knew, others were told their children had died. These children are now fully grown adults, still known as the “Hicks Babies.” We talk to Melinda Dawson and Kriste Hughes about their search for birth parents. 

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the upcoming implosion of the Georgia Dome and the indictment of Paul Manafort. We also talk about one school’s Civil War reenactment, why some of us are not getting enough sleep, and the allegations of sexual assault against Kevin Spacey. Joining us this week are Tomika DePriest, Ed Sohn, Simon Bloom, and London Brown.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

During an interview Monday night on Fox News, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said that "the lack of the ability to compromise led to the Civil War."

His comment was swiftly countered by confounded observers, who pointed out that the Civil War was fought over slavery and that compromising on slavery would be morally unconscionable — and that the country did strike such compromises for decades and they did not, in fact, prevent war.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

School officials say there will be no more Civil War-related student dress-up activities at a Georgia elementary school after its "Civil War Day" sparked conflict among students, parents and others.

Big Shanty Elementary School last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the war.

The mother of a 10-year-old black child says a white student dressed as a plantation owner approached him and said, "You are my slave."

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state Superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture. We talk with Ty Tagami of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also Dana Rickman, Director of Policy and Research with the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education.

Author and founder of the Decatur Book Festival, Daren Wang has a new book. "The Hidden Light of Northern Fires" offers a fresh take on the American Civil War. It was released earlier this month. He joined us in the studio to talk about his first novel.

For the first time in over four decades, West Point authorized an updated text on military history in 2014. This one focuses on the tactics and consequences of the Civil War. We revisit a conversation with Colonel Ty Seidule, one of the book’s editors.

Mark Fischer / Foter

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

A few months ago after much debate, a Civil War monument of Robert E. Lee was removed from downtown New Orleans.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History

This year marks 155 years since a daring operation happened in Georgia to try and end the Civil War. A team of Union soldiers planned to steal a train, and destroy railroad bridges, tunnels, and telegraph lines to the South. All of this was a plot to derail the Confederacy. The locomotive captured in that raid is now on display at the Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History in Kennesaw.

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

When 60-year-old Owen Golay talks about the two Confederate flags he flies in his front yard, he sounds like many Southern defenders of such symbols.

"It stands for heritage; it's a part of our history," Golay said.

But it's not really his history. Golay lives in rural Pleasantville, Iowa, about 40 miles from where he was born. He still carries a small Confederate flag that his father gave him as a child. But aside from some people way back in his family tree who fought on both sides in the Civil War, he has no real ties to the South.

Emily Jones / GPB News

On Skidaway Island today, you’ll find a state park, a marine science institute, and a private golf community. But 150 years ago, right after the Civil War, it was home to a monastery and a school for former slaves. An Armstrong State University professor and a team of student archaeologists are digging up the hidden history on the site of the former school.

 

Sam Whitehead / GPB

This week, one of the largest pieces of Georgia’s Civil War history heads to its new home.

The panoramic painting Battle of Atlanta, also known as the Atlanta Cyclorama, arrives at the Atlanta History Center to undergo an extensive restoration.

But moving the massive painting, which is longer than a football field, hasn’t been easy.

In the Grant Park neighborhood in southeast Atlanta stands an auditorium that, for more than a century, has housed the massive oil painting Battle of Atlanta. Of late, the venue has become a construction site.

Piles of rubble mount and scaffolding extends high into the air — surrounding the large, cylindrical oil painting also known as the Atlanta Cyclorama. The panorama, which is longer than a football field, depicts scenes of Confederate and Union soldiers from the 1864 fall of Atlanta during the American Civil War.

Photo Courtesy of Taylor Brown

"Fallen Land," a recent novel by writer and Georgia native Taylor Brown, depicts a couple fleeing a band of marauders in the final year of the Civil War. The book has been named one of Southern Living’s Best Books of 2016. Brown joins us to talk about his fiction and how it ties in to Georgia history.

SCMPD

Work has resumed at a downtown Savannah construction site after two cannonballs were found and detonated there this week. An Explosive Ordnance Disposal team from Ft. Stewart deemed them unsafe to transport.

Police called them Civil War-era  landmines. But Todd Groce, President and CEO of the Georgia Historical Society, says ammunition was last stored at the site before the war, so they're likely older.

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year. One of Georgia’s most notable parks is found at Kennesaw Mountain, a site that hosted a volatile struggle during the Civil War. Historian and researcher Brad Quinlin discovered that a large number of former slaves participated in the battle; some even lost their lives in the conflict. We talk with Quinlin about the Battle of Kennesaw and the personal stories that make this event so compelling.

Commentary: Learn From Confederate Monuments, Don't Remove Them

Mar 9, 2016
Jud McCranie

Georgia's Civil War legacy has been hotly debated over the years. The Atlanta History Center has created online tools to help put Confederate monuments in historical perspective. In a commentary, the Center’s president and CEO Sheffield Hale says we should learn from Confederate memorials, not tear them down.

 

Jim Bowen

There’s a “pro-white” rally scheduled in April at Stone Mountain, which is Georgia’s most famous Confederate monument. “Pro-white” is how the organizers describe it, others call it a white supremacy rally. Some self-described anti-hate groups are planning to protest the “pro-white” crowd.

Counter protesters include the Confederates of Michigan and the South Carolina-based Bastards Motorcycle Club. They say they want the rally to end without violence. We talked with members of both groups about what they hope to accomplish.

Kevork Djansezian / AP Photo

I’ve never tried playing the game of imagining the guests I’d most like to invite to a dinner party at my house. But I do know that one of the seats would be saved for Cokie Roberts. I’ve interviewed her a number of times over the years, and in each case she displays great skills as a completely engaging conversationalist. She’s warm and funny, always enthusiastic about the topic at hand, and oh so smart. Cokie always makes me feel that she’s glad I asked each question I’ve thrown her way, and I’m sure she does the same for the others who talk to her, too.