Comedy

Natty G Photography / flickr

Atlanta has a healthy appetite for improv. This weekend, Dad’s Garage Theater Company welcomes Scott Adsit. He's best known for roles on the TV shows “30 Rock” and "Moral Orel."  We talked to him about the art of comedy.

Scott performs Friday and Saturday night at 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. at Dad's Garage Theater Company in Atlanta.

Casino Regina / flickr

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on "Whose Line Is It Anyway?," a popular short-form improvisational comedy show. Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live on Aug. 11-12 at Dad’s Garage in Atlanta. We talked with him about his craft.

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We talked with comedian Caroline Rhea, best known for her role on the ABC television show, "Sabrina the Teenage Witch." Rhea is performing June 9 and 10 at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.

Phil Provencio / flickr

Some comedians let nothing keep them from the stage. Ali Wong was in her third trimester when she performed for her Netflix comedy special, “Baby Cobra.” We talked with Ali Wong ahead of her performance at The Tabernacle in Atlanta on Friday, May 12.

Nemr

Some people who flee war-torn countries get a chance to start fresh elsewhere. That’s the case for Lebanese-born comedian Nemr Abou Nassar. He was a young child when he left Lebanon for the United States with his family. Nemr is known as Lebanon's King of Comedy. We talked to him ahead of his performances this weekend at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.   

superartists.com

Sometimes the best way to deal with serious subjects is to have a laugh. Comedian Trae Crowder uses humor to talk about politics and culture, and he's found a big following online. Trae calls himself "the Liberal Redneck" and he seems to take pleasure in flouting Southern stereotypes. He'll perform in Georgia this week as part of the WellRED Comedy Tour, along with fellow comics Corey Ryan Forrester and Drew Morgan.

We kick off our celebration of comedians from Georgia with a hilarious native son.  George Wallace has performed stand-up comedy for four decades and when it comes to audiences, he’s seen it all.  We talk with him about dealing with hecklers, his friendship with Jerry Seinfeld and what Georgia means to him. 

Maria Bamford has been called one of "The 50 Funniest People Now" by Rolling Stone. Stephen Colbert says she is his favorite comedian. And her Netflix series "Lady Dynamite," based on her personal experiences with mental health, gets praise from viewers and critics alike. 

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Wanda Sykes has never held her tongue. One of her comedy specials was literally called "Tongue Untied." She doesn't even hold back when it comes to her own personal life. Last fall, we spoke with Sykes about her comedy career, the entertainment industry, and work-life balance. 

TED

Frequent listeners of NPR’s "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" may know of Maz Jobrani. He's an Iranian-American comedian and actor, and a frequent panelist on the show. Jobrani says comedians can play an important role in challenging stereotypes. He’s been doing it for years.  We caught up with him ahead of a series of performances this week at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.

Asperger's Are Us

Neurological disorders, as a rule, are not funny. That doesn’t mean that the people who suffer from them are not. Take for example the members of the comedy troupe Asperger's Are Us. They all actually do have Asperger’s syndrome, but they don't let their condition define their comedy. The four-member group performs Friday at 8pm at Dad's Garage Theatre Company in Atlanta. We talked with Jack Hanke and Ethan Finlan, two of the group's members.

 

Stacey Bode

We have an eclectic mix on this edition of "Two Way Street." Because it’s summertime (and the livin’ is easy), it seemed like a good time to start the show with something light and fun; and so, we do.

Courtesy of Sick of Stupid

A trio of comedians want to challenge what people think about the South. The Sick of Stupid comedy tour is described as “the voice of reason with a Southern accent.” The performers take on religion, racism, and Bible Belt politics, and their goal is to show audiences that not all Southerners are stuck in the past. 

We speak with comedians Cliff Cash, Tom Simmons, and Stewart Huff about defying Southern stereotypes through comedy. 

faithsalie.com

Make no mistake: Faith Salie’s book, “Approval Junkie: Adventures in Caring Too Much,” is a thoughtful account of the price Salie paid for her obsessive need to win applause and approbation. She examines her thirst for approval unflinchingly. In doing so, she gives us, the readers, the opportunity to examine the lengths we may go to win approval.

But here’s the thing: the book is also very funny; and so, when she came to the studio to record our show, I thought: don’t fight it – just allow the show to be funny.

Funny And Feminist

Mar 10, 2016
Mike Hillman

A sketch comedy show at Dad’s Garage in Atlanta promises to deliver laughs and “smash the patriarchy right through the glass ceiling.” It’s called “Woman of the Year” and features sketches that challenge traditional notions of how women are supposed to act, dress and behave.