Confederate memorials

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This week's Breakroom panel looked back at the week in news. Former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, film critic Stephen Brown, freelance writer Anjali Enjeti and "Greg's List" host Greg Williams chimed in on Mark Zuckerberg's congressional hearing, mass resignations at Atlanta's city hall and the controversial portrayals of Asian characters on shows such as "The Simpsons." 

(AP Photo/Leita Cowart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond is spearheading a challenging proposal to make Stone Mountain a symbol of diversity and inclusiveness.  Could it be a blueprint for dealing with Confederate memorials around the state?  Also, the latest financial disclosure reports show that Georgia gubernatorial candidates have raked in boatloads of cash, but a couple are far our front in the fundraising sweepstakes.  We’ll look at what the reports tell us about the state of the race.  Plus, in the aftermath of Sinclair Broadcasting’s controversial order demanding a mu

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The state of Georgia did away with Confederate History Month in 2015, but last week Atlanta suburb Griffin declared April as Confederate History Month. April 26 will be Confederate Memorial Day. 

During public comments following the proclamation, a former city commissioner, who is white, used racial slurs in an exchange with current commissioner Rodney McCord, who is black.

Kintpuash / Wikimedia Commons

When we talk about what to do with Confederate monuments, there are usually two ends of the spectrum: those who want to remove them entirely and those who want to leave untouched. Adding more historical context to monuments might provide a middle ground, but what would that look like, and would it even solve the problem? Andra Gillespie and Celeste Headlee discussed other states’ attempts to contextualize with Anne Marshall, assistant history professor at Mississippi State University. We also heard from Dan Moore, founder of the African American Panoramic Experience Museum in Atlanta.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

Georgia’s legislative session begins January 8, 2018. But a bill addressing the debate over Confederate monuments has already been filed by Decatur’s State Representative, Mary Margaret Oliver. The bill would allow local governments to decide whether or not to keep or remove monuments.

Thomas Hicks was once a local hero in the small mining community of McCaysville, Georgia. He was the town doctor who made middle-of-the-night house calls. But Hicks had a terrible secret, one still reverberating today. From 1950 to 1965, he sold more than two hundred babies on the black market. Some parents knew, others were told their children had died. These children are now fully grown adults, still known as the “Hicks Babies.” We talk to Melinda Dawson and Kriste Hughes about their search for birth parents. 

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities?

Panelists: