Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In less than two weeks, a critical program for many immigrants in the U.S. illegally expires. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, shields immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children from being deported. The program’s future is still unclear. Emory University professor Marie Marquardt has been watching this closely.

We continued our look at Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Atlanta Journal Constitution reporters Eric Stirgus and Ernie Suggs. They recently rolled out a Re:Race series called “HBCUs: A Threatened Heritage.” The project looks at the enrollment numbers, finances, and the overall future of HBCUs in America. We also heard from some alumni and current HBCU students in Atlanta.

On March 1st, Georgia’s Department of Natural Resources will open its second annual Coyote Challenge.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the U.S. Senate shoots down Senator David Perdue’s plan to dramatically curtail legal immigration and it fails to find common ground on any immigration reform measure.  

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?


AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

LA Johnson / NPR

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. Under DACA, some 800,000 young immigrants, often referred to as "Dreamers," can legally live and work in the U.S. One of those Dreamers is Valentina Emilia Garcia Gonzalez, who moved from Uruguay to Gwinnett County. She told us how the DACA program has helped her.

Updated at 6:17 p.m. ET

Congress has voted to avert a partial government shutdown that could have come Friday night.

Congress, once again, finds itself days away from a potential government shutdown, and a fight over immigration could stand in the way of a deal to prevent it.

"It could happen," Trump told reporters Wednesday. "Democrats are really looking at something that is very dangerous for our country. They are looking at shutting down. They want to have illegal immigrants in many cases, people that we don't want in our country, they want to have illegal immigrants pouring into our country."