Education

Leighton Rowell / GPB

This week we talked about student debt, modern mass protest movements and Martin Luther King Jr.'s lasting legacy. We sat down with our Breakroom guests to process it all. 

We were joined in the studio by Georgia State University professors Tanya Washington and Héctor Fernández, Soumaya Khalifa, executive director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, and Leap Year founder and executive director Amber Scott. 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.

Tim Wilkerson

Mozart’s Magic Flute is a great first opera for children. In additional to magical instruments, it’s got a prince on a rescue mission, a funny but lonely birdcatcher, a high-strung Queen of the Night, wild animals and trials by water and fire.

We’ve all seen it: somebody shops on their work computer, or takes really long lunches, or “borrows” supplies. The workplace doesn’t always foster the most ethical behavior. But recent University of Georgia research shows it can get worse than that. Many employees lie on their timesheets, and even trash their co-workers to get ahead. We discuss with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. And Karen Rommelfanger, a professor from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What do kids need for success in school? Good textbooks? Great teachers? Sure. But there are some intangibles, too.

School Dress Codes Ruffle Feathers

Nov 15, 2017
http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com

Atlanta Public Schools may institute a dress code to ban clothing considered distracting by school officials. At Monday night’s Board of Education meeting, two fifth-grade girls said the language of the code unfairly targets them, and not boys. They both wore leggings, which would be against the proposed rules. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Most school days You can find Jared Moore teaching freshman English at Northeast High School in Macon.


On a recent morning, students all faced each other, with their desks arranged in a room filling oval. Before they got to discussing the day’s text, Moore brought the class to attention.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What did you do the last time your toaster broke? Or your smart phone? 

If you said you threw it out, you aren't alone. So in an age when its more the habit to toss electronics than to fix them, why would you teach high school students how to put together a circuit board? 

Well, not everything is digital. And some stuff can't be replaced.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When students don’t come to open house, why not take open house on the road?

That’s what teachers at Hartley Elementary in Macon did the day before the first day of school this week when they piled onto a bus and toured the Hartley school zone.

Why do this? Principal Carmalita Dillard said, sure, a lot of kids missed open house, but there were other reasons.

“I want the teachers to be able to experience where our kids come from,” Dillard said.

WALB-TV

According to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses.

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