Education

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What did you do the last time your toaster broke? Or your smart phone? 

If you said you threw it out, you aren't alone. So in an age when its more the habit to toss electronics than to fix them, why would you teach high school students how to put together a circuit board? 

Well, not everything is digital. And some stuff can't be replaced.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When students don’t come to open house, why not take open house on the road?

That’s what teachers at Hartley Elementary in Macon did the day before the first day of school this week when they piled onto a bus and toured the Hartley school zone.

Why do this? Principal Carmalita Dillard said, sure, a lot of kids missed open house, but there were other reasons.

“I want the teachers to be able to experience where our kids come from,” Dillard said.

WALB-TV

According to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses.

Physics Tutor / flickr

More than six decades ago, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling. For the first time in history, it was illegal for states to have separate public schools for black and white students. However, many public schools in the South have actually re-segregated in the years since Brown v. Board, according to a recent report from Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

They say you can’t go home again. So maybe you should take a good long look before you leave?

That’s what seniors from Northside High School in Warner Robins did recently when they took a field trip to their old elementary and middle schools.

At Westside Elementary, students lined the halls to see the graduates. When Northside students walked in wearing their blue caps and gowns, students and teachers erupted.  At the head of the line is Alexis Monroy. This was her school.

As we head into the 100th day of the Trump presidency, NPR Ed has our regular weekly education roundup to keep you in the loop.

Attorneys General speak out on behalf of student borrowers

Twenty state attorneys general and the District of Columbia this week sent a letter criticizing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for revoking federal protections for student borrowers.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

All the open seats at the Academy for Classical Education were gone by the time Sammy Smith’s daughters’ names were pulled in the school’s admissions lottery.

By then it was all about the waiting list for the parents still hanging around the ACE cafeteria on a day in February.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Over a quarter of the schools on the Georgia’s Priority Schools List are moving on.

 

In total, 74 out of the 243 schools on the list have worked their way off the list. Most of those schools are in the Atlanta metro area, especially in the Atlanta Public School system and the Dekalb County School System.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Do you love the kitchen? Do you love it enough earn your living there?

High School students at in the culinary arts track at the Hutchings College and Career Academy in Macon get to answer both of those questions at the school’s Compass Rose Cafe.

 

Ezra Morris / GPB

Bills that would create some big changes in education in Georgia are headed to Governor Nathan Deal’s desk.

Deal has said he will definitely sign HB 338 which will allow for state takeover of schools which the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement has designated as “Chronically Failing.” It also creates a new state level executive position, the Chief Turnaround Officer. Deal said he isn’t sure just how many schools the Chief Turnaround Officer will take on right off the bat.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What are you going to do when you grow up? We ask our kids that all the time.

To answer that, first you have to know what jobs are even out there. That’s why students in Cherilyn Keily’s class at Bonaire Middle School have been raising chickens.

Near Session's End, Lawmakers Rush On Taxes, Education Bills

Mar 29, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

State lawmakers worked late into the evening Tuesday, rushing to pass legislation affecting Georgians' income taxes, treatment for opioid addiction and a strategy to turn around the state's lowest performing schools.

Tuesday marked the 39th day of the 40-day legislative session. Lawmakers plan to adjourn on Thursday. The rush to pass bills before the end of the 40th day can lead to dramatic last-minute changes to legislation — either accidental or intentional amid the chaos.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Learning English is not easy.

That can be true even for immigrants to the United States who have had the benefit of the best education available in the countries where they grew up.

Now imagine you're a kid from a country torn apart by war or political unrest. You may be lucky to be literate in your first language. Taking a child like that from speaking no English to speaking the language well enough to go to high school is no mean feat. 

University Of Georgia

The University of Georgia will rebury the bodies that were discovered during the construction of Baldwin Hall in December 2015. The remains of 105 individuals were found during work on the expansion of Baldwin Hall, which is adjacent to the Old Athens Cemetery. During the 19th century, the Old Athens Cemetery operated as the official town cemetery.

Grant Blankenship

Do you remember the last time you worked really hard on something? If someone was working on the same thing and got ahead before you, you would want to know why that happened, right?

That’s where the leaders of many Georgia schools find themselves. Last year schools on Georgia Governor Nathan Deal’s Priority Schools List thought they had dodged a bullet when the Priority School District proposal died at the polls. That would have allowed state takeover of what the state calls failing schools. Now a bill in the Georgia House has raised that idea again.

Georgia Southern University

There is change in the works at two Georgia universities. Earlier this year, the University System Board of Regents voted to merge Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new school will keep Georgia Southern’s name. Since 2011, the university system has completed seven mergers, in the interests of efficiency and economy.

Georgia Lottery

Legislation that would mandate what percentage of Georgia Lottery revenue goes to education programs has passed the state Senate.

 

The bill attempts to restore funding levels to those set in 1993 when the Georgia Lottery Corporation was established.

 

Matt Barnett / Flickr

A new education bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Kevin Tanner would allow the state to provide systems of support and assistance for low-performing schools in Georgia.

gopleader / flickr

Betsy DeVos was confirmed last week as President Donald Trump’s secretary of education. She has been an aggressive proponent of school choice, but her definition of school choice may not be the same as how other people define it. School choice is one of those phrases that gets thrown around a lot, but is often misunderstood. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.  

University of Georgia

In a world of screens, some teachers are putting their foot down with technology in the classroom. And research suggests there may be good reason behind that decision. A recent study from MIT found college students do better on exams when they’re not allowed access to computers.

Shayna Waltower / Center for Collaborative Journalism

Schools in Macon-Bibb have largely re-segregated along racial lines. One quarter of all white students in the county go to a single charter school. These facts and others are what we are asking you to talk to us about in a project with our partners at the The Macon Telegraph and the Center for Collaborative Journalism. Hear what a few people had to say in this video from our first conversation and then come join us Thursday, Jan. 26 at 6 p.m. at the Museum of Arts and Sciences for the second discussion.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday in a dispute that advocates describe as the most important case involving public school special education in three decades.

At issue is whether federal law requires public schools to provide more than the bare minimum in special services for children with disabilities. With millions of children qualifying for these services, the court's ruling could have a profound effect.

The confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, the billionaire philanthropist who is President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of education, has been delayed for almost a week.

DeVos' hearing was scheduled for Wednesday, but late on Monday night, the Senate Committee on Health Education Labor and Pensions announced it had been delayed until Jan. 17, next Tuesday.

U.S. Department of Education

One of the final acts by the Obama administration deals with corporal punishment in schools.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Yesterday, Georgia governor Nathan Deal suspended all five members of the Dooly County school board following concerns about the district's accreditation. High school graduation rates in Georgia remain below the national average, but data released last month by the U.S.

Lots of people say they can't draw and if they do doodle, they draw boxes or something really simple.  But Atlanta-based illustrator Mike Lowery wants to start young when it comes to creating artists. He's the author of "The Pursuit of the Pesky Pizza Pirate!" It's part of a series of books that encourage kids to doodle. We talked with Lowery about why doodling matters. 

pixabay

The U.S. Department of Justice sued Georgia last week for allegedly segregating and mistreating thousands of public school students, who are enrolled in a statewide program called GNETS.

Georgia Student Finance Commission

A new report says Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship program will run out of money by 2028 – the year today’s pre-K students will start college. Nearly two million students have received HOPE since the program began in 1993, and 98 percent of the freshman class at UGA will be getting either HOPE or Zell Miller scholarships.

The Huffington Post recently tracked media reports of K-12 students who were tasered or shot with a stun gun by a school police officer. In the last five years, there were at least 84 incidents, including a few in Georgia.

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