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The Air Force Academy says a cadet whose dorm room was marked by a racist slur this fall is also the person responsible for writing the message. The incident had prompted the academy's leader to deliver an impassioned speech about inclusion and tolerance.

Texas A&M University's football fans have a shot at staying just across the street from the school's stadium — but they'll need to plunk down $100,000 for the honor, provided they win a lottery this week. Another perk: The money is tax deductible, as a gift to the school.

The Texas A&M Hotel and Conference Center isn't fully built yet. But for months now, the school has been calling for supporters to pay from $5,000 to $10,000 in deposits, to get a chance at a 10-year option to reserve one of the hotel's 250 rooms and suites.

"A busybody." That's how Raven Judd describes her 10-month-old daughter Bailey.

"She loves tummy time. She likes to roll over. She'd dive if you let her," says the 27-year-old mother from Washington, D.C.

There is one thing, though, that will get her baby girl to stop what she's doing: when her mother reads her favorite book, the aptly named My Busy Book.

Hello! We're back this week with a roundup that focuses on the goings-on at 400 Maryland Ave. SW — that's the federal Department of Education, in case you didn't know.

DeVos comments on LGBT student protections in new profile

The University of Notre Dame will no longer provide birth control coverage to students and employees, taking advantage of the Trump administration's decision to weaken the Affordable Care Act's birth control mandate.

As Indiana Public Media notes, the Catholic university previously "made the coverage available through a third-party service separate from the rest of its health insurance and attempted to sue for the right to not offer the coverage at all."

Dropping The F-Bomb In Class? Teachers Weigh In

Nov 3, 2017

Warning: This post contains language that some may find offensive.

So we asked, and you answered: Is it ever OK for students to curse in the classroom?

The question comes out of our "Raising Kings" series, where a radical new approach in a Washington, D.C., high school has led educators to move beyond suspending students for disruptive behavior, to talking with those kids to learn where the behavior comes from.

Decatur Parents Debate Over Transgender School Policy

Nov 2, 2017
Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

A debate is unfolding in City of Decatur schools about transgender rights. At a September school board meeting, a parents’ group criticized a policy protecting transgender students in Decatur. Those parents have launched a petition to rescind the policy, put in place by Superintendent David Dude last year. Vernadette Broyles is an attorney representing the parents in the petition.

This story contains language that some readers may find offensive.

"I can't teach the book right now," says Shaka Greene, algebra teacher at Ron Brown College Preparatory High School. "Because my students are still learning to add 49 plus 17."

So begins Part 3 — the conclusion of our podcast series: Raising Kings: A Year of Love and Struggle at Ron Brown College Prep.

Allegations of sexual misconduct against three Dartmouth College professors have resulted in a multi-agency criminal investigation, says New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald.

All of the professors — Todd Heatherton, Bill Kelley and Paul Whalen — work in Dartmouth's psychological and brain sciences department. They've been put on paid leave and their access to campus is restricted, according to New Hampshire Public Radio.

Which of these statements seems more trustworthy to you?

1) Americans are drowning in a tsunami of ignorance! There is a conspiracy at the highest levels to replace all knowledge with propaganda and disinformation.

2) A recent Stanford University report found that more than 80 percent of middle schoolers didn't understand that the phrase "sponsored content" meant "advertising."

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Earlier this month, the toy-giant Mattel announced it had pulled the plug on plans to sell an interactive gadget for children.

The device, called Aristotle, looked similar to a baby monitor with a camera. Critics called it creepy.

Powered by artificial intelligence, Aristotle could get to know your child — at least that was how the device was being pitched.

Is The F-Word Ever OK In The Classroom?

Oct 29, 2017

Warning: This post contains language that some may find offensive.

The scene: A teacher training at a new high school in Washington, D.C. The topic on the table? Students and the language they use:

"So this should be a place that I should be able to come and express my thoughts. I may be having a bad day. I may come in, and I'll be like, 'f***'."

That's Shatane Porter, a counselor at Ron Brown College Preparatory High School. And yes, he is talking about the F-word. And whether it's OK for students to say it. In class. In front of their teacher.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In the nonfiction book and movie "Hidden Figures," three African-American women mathematicians defy the odds by going to work for NASA in the early '60s.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "HIDDEN FIGURES")

Learning How Bullying Happens In Order To Prevent It

Oct 27, 2017

One in four students report being bullied, but not all say they are bullied the same way. And some students are more likely to experience bullying than others.

That's what one new survey found after posing questions to more than 180,000 students across 412 schools between 2012 and 2017. The data, collected by the nonprofit organization Youth Truth Student Survey, looked at fifth- through 12th-graders in 37 states.

Is The NCAA Equipped To Handle Scandals?

Oct 26, 2017

With guest host John Donvan.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association is responsible for governing hundreds of thousands of students who compete in college-level sports.

But lately, the NCAA has come under fire for its handling of a massive bribery scandal that’s prompted a federal investigation into college basketball.

As Europe was being torn apart in the early 17th century by conflicts between Catholics and Protestants — that would lead to the devastating Thirty Years War in 1618 — the German astronomer Johannes Kepler wrote:

"When the storm rages and the shipwreck of the state threatens, we can do nothing more worthy than to sink the anchor of our peaceful studies into the ground of eternity."

Two years ago this month, President Barack Obama had a clear message for teachers and parents who were concerned about all the standardized tests that students were taking: He was on their side.

In a video statement, he gave parents this pop quiz:

If our kids had more free time at school, what would you want them to do with it?

This past spring, a history teacher in North Carolina was giving a lesson about Christopher Columbus. He covered how Columbus and his men enslaved and otherwise mistreated the native people of the island of Hispaniola.

One white student piped up: "Well, that's what needed to happen. They were just dumb people anyways like they are today. That was the purpose, that's why we need a wall."

For nearly 60 years, Northern Virginia students have attended J.E.B. Stuart High School, named after a Confederate general who died in battle. Now, after a contentious dispute, the Fairfax County School Board is expected to vote to change the school's name.

The debate has dragged on for two years and has included raucous community forums and testy board meetings.

50 Years of 60 Minutes

Oct 25, 2017

Even if you haven’t flipped past CBS on Sunday night in a while, you probably know this sound …

“60 Minutes” is more than a staple of the CBS lineup. The weekly newsmagazine is a journalistic and broadcasting institution. It has broken major stories, hosted some of the most distinguished journalists on TV, won 138 Emmys and 20 Peabody Awards and it has drawn in countless viewers.

Appeals Court Rules Against Immigrants Over In-State Tuition

Oct 25, 2017
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

Immigrants who have been granted temporary status to stay in the U.S. will have to keep paying out-of-state tuition after an appeals court ruled against them, saying state colleges and universities in Georgia aren't required to let them pay in-state tuition.

"They can't just be average."

Charles Curtis is talking about the roughly 100 young, black men in the inaugural freshman class at Ron Brown College Prep, a radical new high school in Washington, D.C.

Curtis, the school psychologist, puts it simply: "There is no place in the world for an average black person."

So begins Part 2 in our series: Raising Kings: A Year of Love and Struggle at Ron Brown College Prep.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Most school days You can find Jared Moore teaching freshman English at Northeast High School in Macon.


On a recent morning, students all faced each other, with their desks arranged in a room filling oval. Before they got to discussing the day’s text, Moore brought the class to attention.

The wildfires in Northern California cut across a wide swath of the state — including dozens of school districts, hundreds of schools and hundreds of thousands of students. At one point, classes were canceled for 260,000 students in 600 schools.

And while schools are slowly coming back on line, there remain many that may not resume classes for days or even weeks.

Our weekly roundup of education news and happenings may make you uncomfortable, but please don't ban our inconvenient truths.

A Mississippi district bans To Kill A Mockingbird

"I'll be famous one day, but for now I'm stuck in middle school with a bunch of morons." That's harsh language from the downtrodden sixth-grade narrator of Diary of A Wimpy Kid, a blockbuster series of graphic novels.

But it speaks to a broader truth.

Typically, when law enforcement pursues a suspect who has failed to turn himself in on several outstanding warrants, it takes the dedicated effort of officers and some tips from the community to finally bring the person in.

It's fair to say what happened in Redford Township, Mich., this month was not typical: A suspect turned himself in after making — and losing — a pretty inadvisable bet with police ... involving doughnuts.

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