Education

Ways to Connect

This week in our roundup, we travel from Arizona to the United Kingdom to the Philippines to bring you the education news.

Teachers in Arizona head back to class

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The brothers' Facebook pages are littered with jokes and jabs with their friends. They also post photos of their dog and their mom. They're described as quiet and thoughtful — except when they're rocking in their metal band, Snot Goblin.

In other words, they're American teenagers.

But Thomas Kanewakeron Gray, 19, and Lloyd Skanahwati Gray, 17, are also Native American — and their mother says their appearance was the reason police were called to question the pair as they tried to tour the campus of Colorado State University this week.

The wide lawns outside the state Capitol appeared Thursday morning much as they have for about a week: overflowing with a sea of educators, clad in red and toting bold-lettered signs.

Yet the mood among the crowd of teachers who had walked out of their classrooms — for so long seeped through with frustration and anger — showed tinges of a different feeling altogether: joy.

Our Take A Number series is exploring problems around the world through the lens of a single number. Today's number is 81, which is how many French schools a journalist visited to teach kids about disinformation on the Internet.

As the bell rings, students file into class at Maxence Van der Meersch middle school. This morning the kids have a visitor — investigative journalist Thomas Huchon.

Without telling them the topic of his visit, Huchon says he's going to show them a mini-documentary.

Yale University announced Wednesday that its board of trustees voted to rescind the honorary degree awarded to comedian Bill Cosby in 2003.

For a few hours Wednesday, it appeared that the end to Arizona's massive teacher walkout was finally at hand. Protest leaders announced earlier this week they would accept a pay hike that they once dismissed as unsustainable — and Gov. Doug Ducey stood ready to sign it.

An unusual sound fills the once silent space. On the main floor of the Fine Arts Library at the University of Texas at Austin, a 3D printer softly whirs.

Tim Zawistowski stands over the printer, trying to create a miniature tree for a model he's building. Someday, the sophomore hopes to design lighting and projections for live events. Today, though, his dimensions are off, so he heads back to his computer.

"I'll add another 5 millimeters, and it will be good," Zawistowski says.

More than 9 in 10 teachers say they joined the profession for idealistic reasons — "I wanted to do good" — but most are struggling to some extent economically.

May 1 is an exciting day for many high school seniors. It's decision day, when students commit to college — and send in those deposits — to hold their spot on campus.
Across the country, schools celebrate the achievement in different ways. Some hold assemblies where students get up and announce their decisions. In other places, students wear their college gear — a T-shirt or ball cap or sweatshirt.

Writing a couplet can be tough,
But when you work with friends, it's not so rough.

On Monday, NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners and readers to share poems about the teams in their lives — both on and off the court.

If you’re a kid or the parent of one, you have no shortage of choices when it comes to family-friendly TV shows. Fifty years ago, the options were much more limited. And educational programs for kids were a relatively new genre.

From an August 1969 article in The Atlantic that profiled three stars of children’s television, including the iconic Fred Rogers:

The Call-In: Teaching And School Funding

Apr 29, 2018

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Time now for The Call-In.

(SOUNDBITE OF CORDUROI'S "MY DEAR")

Very few government reports have had the staying power of "A Nation At Risk," which appeared 35 years ago this month and stoked widespread concerns about the quality of American schools.

"The educational foundations of our society are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future as a nation and as a people," the authors thundered in one of its best-known passages.

This week, we're digging through federal data and cruising YouTube to bring you the most relevant education news.

New federal data: Black students disproportionately punished, arrested

Teachers Walk Out In Colorado

Apr 27, 2018

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Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

At first glance, the scene probably looked familiar to many people in Phoenix: tens of thousands massing outside Chase Field on a bright Thursday afternoon in April, clad in red and rippling with anticipation. But that scene, if it were typical, would feature fans of the Arizona Diamondbacks — not the teachers who gathered near the baseball stadium with quite another event in mind.

There are now well over 1,000 colleges and universities that don't require SAT or ACT scores in deciding whom to admit, a number that's growing every year. And a new study finds that scores on those tests are of little value in predicting students' performance in college, and raises the question: Should those tests be required at all?

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