Education

Ways to Connect

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is apologizing for saying a teachers' strike left hundreds of thousands of children vulnerable to sexual assault and drug use.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now a story about the struggle of American Muslims against discrimination. NPR's Leila Fadel concludes her series on a new generation of American Muslims with this report on a family in Northern California.

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is having a no good, miserable day.

Teachers' union leaders in Oklahoma have ended a nine-day, statewide strike after winning salary raises but seeing a lack of legislative action otherwise.

Two months ago today, a shooter killed 17 students and teachers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

After the tragedy, threats to schools across the country rose.

Nation's Report Card: mostly flat

The 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the Nation's Report Card, showed no statistically significant changes from 2015, except for a slight uptick in 8th grade reading scores. This test is given every two years to fourth and eighth graders in reading and math. It is not high-stakes, but it is the largest single test enabling a comparison of students across the country.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Sean Simpson, a teacher at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, has spoken in favor of gun control efforts and said he might be open to the idea of carrying a gun in class. Now, he has been arrested after leaving his Glock 9 mm pistol in a bathroom over the weekend.

When Evan Taylor heard that Oklahoma teachers planned to walkout, he converted his small Tulsa church into a "glorified daycare" furnished with board games, crafts and a movies to keep kids entertained.

Updated at 10:20 p.m. ET

The Justice Department is reportedly investigating possible antitrust violations by a number of elite colleges related to the sharing of information between them to enforce the terms of their early-admissions programs.

West Virginia. Oklahoma. Arizona. Teachers are organizing for better working conditions all over the country.

Teachers in Arizona are staging what they're calling a walk-in today. They're asking lawmakers for a 20 percent pay raise and for school funding to return to pre-recession levels. This comes as teachers in Oklahoma continue their walk-out. After more than a week of protests and dozens of closed schools across the state, Oklahoma lawmakers have already agreed to increase teacher pay and school funding.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The teacher protest movement that began in West Virginia in February has spread west to Oklahoma — where teachers are in their second week of walkouts — and now to Arizona.

On Wednesday, Arizona teachers are staging a statewide "walk-in," demanding a boost in pay and more funding for schools overall.

Arizona students protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program will no longer be eligible for in-state college tuition, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The 7-0 ruling upheld an earlier decision in the Court of Appeals last year that said DACA recipients, often called DREAMers, who have been granted "lawful status" but not "legal status" do not qualify to pay resident rates.

Monday's decision will affect more than 2,000 students enrolled in Arizona's community colleges and three public universities.

NPR Ed is investigating student financial aid award letters, and we'd like to see the ones that you and your college-bound kids have received.

We expect that reading through these forms will help us understand the challenges that families across the country face when deciphering their financial aid awards — what money you'll get, what you're expected to pay, and what all of that means for your family.

Black Magic: Richard Potter Reappears

Apr 10, 2018

Two hundred years ago, Richard Potter was one of the most coveted performers in America. He garnered nationwide fame through magic and ventriloquism and made popular entertainment a fixture of American life.

He was also black, born in 1783. His father had previously been enslaved.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In 1996, right after voters in California banned affirmative action in employment and college admissions, minority student enrollment at two and four-year institutions plummeted. What has happened since though, is pretty remarkable.

Of the 2.8 million students attending college in California today, two out of three come from racially and ethnically diverse populations. The most eye-popping increase in enrollment has been among Latinos.

Adam and Holly Groza are home-school parents in Redlands, Calif., a suburban town an hour east of Los Angeles.

"We met families that home-schooled and they were mature, and thoughtful, and kind," Holly says. "These teenagers would look at you when you talked and actually interact. And, I think we saw that end goal and said, 'That's what we want.'"

The four Groza children, ages 6 through 12, get as much social interaction and life experience as any other student through activities like sports and drama classes.

Pages