Education

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Marcelo Gleiser is a theoretical physicist and writer — and a professor of natural philosophy, physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. He is the director of the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Engagement at Dartmouth, co-founder of 13.7 and an active promoter of science to the general public.

America needs teachers committed to working with children who have the fewest advantages in life. So for a decade the federal government has offered grants — worth up to $4,000 a year — to standout college students who agree to teach subjects like math or science at lower-income schools.

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So a mysterious foreign visit really is not that mysterious anymore.

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Conservative Christian colleges, once relatively insulated from the culture war, are increasingly entangled in the same battles over LGBT rights and related social issues that have divided other institutions in America.

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Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Tuesday

Linda Brown, who as a schoolgirl was at the center of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that rejected racial segregation in American schools, died in Topeka, Kan., Sunday afternoon. She was 76.

Her sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Hundreds of thousands of marchers rallied across the United States and around the world Saturday to demand action against gun violence. The "March for Our Lives" protest displayed the resilience behind a new wave of political activism, led by survivors of the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

For many students, the rallies were their first demonstration for a cause and a social reckoning of what they are capable of. They bundled in the nation's capital, delivering a defiant message: stricter gun regulation.

Hundreds of thousands of students, teachers, parents and victims gathered in Washington, D.C., and across the country on Saturday to rally for tougher gun control measures.

I'm an illustrator at NPR and I was in our nation's capital with a sketchbook and some pens. Here's what I saw:

Money talks and students walk in this week's edition of the education news roundup.

National student march

Our latest NPR Ed video takes on that question so many parents are asking: How much time should my kid spend looking at phones and screens and tablets and TVs and ...

In a nutshell (and inspired by food writer Michael Pollan), my advice is:

"Enjoy screens. Not too much. Mostly together."

On Saturday, thousands of youth activists are expected to participate in the "March for Our Lives," — in Washington, D.C.; in Accra, Ghana, Israel, Chile and elsewhere around the world.

Parkland Survivor On 'March For Our Lives'

Mar 23, 2018

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After the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14, students across the country have raised their voices to protest gun violence: "Enough is enough." "Never again." "Not one more."

For Lela Free, a freshman in Marshall County, Ky., another phrase comes to mind.

"We should have been the last," she says.

Just weeks before the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, a student armed with a handgun entered Marshall County High School in Kentucky. He killed two students, and injured 18 others.

Nearly three-fourths of U.S. teachers do not want to carry guns in school, and they overwhelmingly favor gun control measures over security steps meant to "harden" schools, according to a new Gallup poll.

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