Election 2016

Ways to Connect

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This has been a challenging year for people writing political comedy.

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Granted there's no shortage of material. The problem is how to satirize actual events that seem like satire to begin with.

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

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It is hard to keep track of all the ways that today's election could make history.

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Hillary Clinton, if she wins, would come to be the first female president.

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The day that everyone has been talking about is finally here. While millions of Americans have already cast their ballots in early-voting states, the majority of votes will be cast today.

NPR will have live results as polls close at 7 p.m. ET right here on NPR.org and on your local NPR station.

It's been hard to find voices of hope this election season. People seem to feel they're choosing between the lesser of two evils.

Not E.J. Johnson: "This is mostly, one of the mostly, heart-racing thrilling things I've ever done!"

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," the closing arguments are being made as candidates and their surrogates wind down their last minute push toward the White House. We bring you the most up-to-date information from the trail and the latest reports filed from across the country and here in Georgia. 

Did your last round of utility bill payments break the bank? If you live in Atlanta, it turns out you’re probably paying more than everyone else in the country. The home listing website Trulia recently published a study on metro Atlanta’s utility prices. We’ll speak with Trulia housing data analyst Felipe Chacon, who conducted the study.

Dissatisfied Georgia Voters Skip Top Of The Ticket

Nov 7, 2016
Ezra Morris / GPB

As election season winds down, two Georgia voters say they will not be voting for president on November 8. Retired US Army Colonel Robert Roth from Columbus, Georgia is a veteran of three combat tours, registered Republican, and father of four. Emory student Arhum Qazi from Macon, Georgia is the son of Muslim immigrant parents. Both have said they do not have plans to vote for either Trump or Clinton but do plan to vote in down-ballot races. 

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The twists and turns of the 2016 election — not to mention the characters at the top of each major-party ticket — provide many opportunities for comedy. But it's tough out there for late-night joke-makers, who face more competition than ever, not to mention a social-media landscape in which seemingly every possible quip is being made in real time.

The U.S. Justice Department says it will have more than 500 monitors and observers out Tuesday watching polling sites in 28 states. They'll be looking for any voting rights violations, such as whether voters are discriminated against because of their race or language.

"The bedrock of our democracy is the right to vote, and the Department of Justice works tirelessly to uphold that right, not only on Election Day, but every day," Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement.

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FiveThirtyEight

On Nov. 8, the presidency will be decided once one of the candidates reaches 270 electoral votes. Electoral votes are cast by members of the Electoral College. That's something most people know, but what they don't know is how exactly the Electoral College works.

Republicans are feeling the best they have this cycle about their chances of holding their majority in the U.S. Senate, but doing that would require several states to break their way on election night. That's a risky place to be one day before control of the Senate is decided.

The tightening of the presidential race over the past week may have had an impact on these Senate contests. Most of the contests remain firm toss-ups, though Democrats still have multiple paths to winning back the five seats they need (or just four if Democrat Hillary Clinton wins the presidency).

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Election night is going to be information overload. We wanted to provide an easy-to-use guide of which counties to keep tabs on that could tell you how states might vote that are crucial to the election.

So we took 15 of the states where this election has been hotly waged and identified one county in each that has gone with the winner or closely reflected the statewide margin in each. We tried to pick counties that had a large enough population to matter some — or if they just had a knack for picking that statewide winner.

Finally. Election Day. It's almost here.

The campaign that many thought would never end is ending tomorrow. Here's our handy guide to some things that the results will tell us — and why they matter for the future.

1. What message do American voters want to send with their choice for president?

Yes, the presidential race is very close, and some public polls show it getting closer as we go into the final hours, but in one sense it's actually been stable for months.

Election Day is nearly upon us. So where does the electoral map stand? It's a close race, with Hillary Clinton retaining a broad and consistent but shallow advantage, according to the final NPR Battleground Map.

Compared with a couple of weeks ago, when Clinton hit her peak lead, the race has tightened. So our map reflects that — almost all of the moves benefit Trump, though because of one potentially determinative move, Clinton still surpasses the 270 electoral votes needed to be president with just the states in which she's favored.

As Rep. Barbara Comstock marched in the Leesburg, Va., Halloween parade last week, she was trailed by massive trucks and buses decked out for Donald Trump.

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Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," entering the final days of the presidential election candidates continue to ramp up their travel schedules and pull out all the stops. The past seven days have provided a steady flow of leaks following FBI director James Comey's letter to Congress indicating further interest in Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server. Our panel of political insiders and strategy experts analyze the effects this announcement has had on the campaign and how it has shifted strategies heading to Election Day.

Brenda Lopez Campaign Website

Democrat Brenda Lopez is poised to become the first Latina elected to the Georgia General Assembly. An attorney and immigrant, she’s running unopposed in Tuesday’s election to represent House District 99, which includes the Norcross area of Gwinnett County. 

We talk with Lopez about her groundbreaking candidacy and her vision for the district and Georgia as a whole. 

Georgia Voters To Decide If Judicial Watchdog Needs Overhaul

Nov 4, 2016

The actions of Georgia's judicial watchdog have led to the departure of more than five dozen judges over the past decade for such transgressions as sexual assault, writing racist notes and pointing a gun at people in court. While few would disagree that those judges needed to go, voters will decide Tuesday whether the watchdog itself needs watching.

The presidential election looks very different from the heights of the economy than it does from its depths.

In North Carolina, rural Bertie County, the poorest in the state, and tech hub Wake County, the most prosperous, are less than two hours apart by car in this important presidential swing state. And yet they could almost be on opposite sides of the world. Charlotte Gilliam, a resident of Bertie, says the difference between there and Wake is "from here to China."

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