Election 2016

Ways to Connect

There is a lot of generational shaming going around this election season, and it's not all entirely accurate, so we're here with a handy Millennial FAQ to answer your questions about this much discussed generation — as well as what role it has played this campaign and could play on Tuesday night.

First, who are millennials?

There are different definitions of millennials. But broadly speaking, it's a label for people in their 20s into their early 30s.

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No matter who wins the presidential election on Tuesday, it's nearly certain Congress will be more narrowly divided come January.

And with no clear mandate likely coming out of 2016, there is little reason to be overly optimistic that the next Congress can escape the cycle of unproductivity and polarization that has gripped Washington in recent years.


The 115th Congress: Political Dynamics

With little chance of a Democratic House takeover in the 2016 election, the two likeliest scenarios are:

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Rep. John Lewis Stumps For Hillary Clinton

Nov 4, 2016

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And now let's hear from a Democrat, Representative John Lewis of Georgia, who's known for his work during the civil rights movement and is now focused on bringing out the African-American vote, if he can, for Hillary Clinton.

Congressman, welcome back to the program.

Jenn Stanley tries not to bring up politics when she returns home to visit her father. She really, really tries.

"But you always watch the 5 o'clock news, and the minute any politician steps on — it doesn't matter who it is — I just cringe."

Bus route 61 in Milwaukee, Wisc., cuts through political lines in a hotly contested swing state. It travels from liberal Milwaukee through to Waukesha County, one of the most conservative in the state.

The bus route was first established to help residents in central city neighborhoods get jobs, mainly retail positions in the suburbs. For Breanna Jordan , a 24-year-old living in Milwaukee, her livelihood depends on bus route 61. She works at a Walmart in Menomonee Falls, an hour and a half bus ride each way.

Moving To Canada, Eh? Or Maybe Ireland?

Nov 3, 2016

It seems every four years, Americans threaten to move to Canada if their preferred presidential candidate isn't elected. But with two of the most unpopular candidates in history on the ballot, 2016 might be the year some people actually go through with it.

Safe Harbor Yes

The Safe Harbor Act is one of the four amendments Georgians will be voting on in next Tuesday's election.

If it passes, the state will impose additional fees on those convicted of certain sex trafficking crimes, as well as adult entertainment establishments. That money will fund treatment and resources for victims of child sex trafficking.

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The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the vandalizing and burning of a black church in Mississippi. "Vote Trump" had been spray-painted on a wall.

Local authorities are still searching for the person or people responsible for the fire, which they have identified as an arson.

"When firefighters arrived at Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church Tuesday night, they found it in flames, and the 'Vote Trump' slogan written in silver spray paint on the outside wall of the church," Mark Rigsby of Mississippi Public Broadcasting reports.

Americans will decide more than 150 state ballot measures on Tuesday — up slightly from two years ago. That puts a lot of pressure on voters to study up on everything from marijuana legalization to gun control to the death penalty.

Californians in particular have a lot of homework to do. With 17 measures, their state has the longest ballot in the country this year. On top of that, there are 650 local measures around the state to decide on.

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It's been quite an election for the media. Donald Trump attacked the media again yesterday, calling out an NBC reporter by name.

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With Election Day less than a week off, we're hearing the closing arguments that the candidates are making. Yesterday we heard from a Trump campaign official, and now we're joined by Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook. Welcome to the program.

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Atlanta Area Movie Theaters To Broadcast Election Night Results

Nov 2, 2016
Caroline Kaster / AP Photo

If you like politics and popcorn, you're in luck. Ballots and butter will collide Nov. 8 when AMC Theatres and CNN will broadcast the presidential election on the big screen at 50 theaters in 25 cities nationwide.

Audience members can choose between "red" and "blue" locations, depending on party preference. In Atlanta, Democrats should head to Morrow, while Republicans head to Cumming. 

The broadcast, which will also include major national, state and local elections, will begin at 7 p.m. Eastern.

Pavel Golovkin / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," we look at the challenges that await the next president and keeper of the nuclear codes. Tensions in the Middle East and Russia continue to rise as historical deals and relationships continue to deteriorate. Our panel discusses the current nuclear climate and the policy-making decisions that the next president faces.

When it comes to health care, the choice between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump comes down to whether to keep, or trash, the Affordable Care Act.

Trump says he wants to repeal and replace the health care law that is responsible for insuring about 20 million people, while Clinton has vowed to retain it and even expand its reach.

Here are the candidates' plans:


HILLARY CLINTON

  • Keep and build on Obamacare
  • Offer a tax credit of up to $5,000 to offset out-of-pocket costs over 5 percent of income

A week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona.

Today, she heads out on that trip, but in a presidential election that has now seen a tightened race from where it was a week and a half ago.

Newspaper endorsements have been few and far between for Donald Trump this year. Several traditionally conservative papers like The Dallas Morning News and The Cincinnati Enquirer endorsed Hillary Clinton or Libertarian Gary Johnson this year. Others declined to endorse a candidate at all.

Trump's latest newspaper endorsement, though, is something his campaign is making it very clear they do not want: The Crusader, a newspaper affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan, and that brands itself as "the premier voice of the white resistance."

It's that time again: time for Americans to figure out how, exactly, their presidential election works. "Electoral College" searches spike every four years, just before Election Day, according to Google ... and the search volume is picking up right now.

Long story short: To win the presidency, you don't have to win the majority of the popular vote. You have to win the majority of electoral votes — that is, 270 of them.* In most states, a candidate wins electoral votes by winning the most voters.

This year's presidential campaign seems to be one of a kind, but it is really part of a bigger picture that stretches beyond the U.S.

Donald Trump's message to anyone who doubts he can win: Look at what happened in the United Kingdom last summer. The vote to leave the EU in June was fueled by some of the same issues that Trump is tapping.

"Believe me. This is Brexit times five. You watch what's going to happen," he said last month.

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You know, not that long ago, Donald Trump was dismissing the polls that showed his campaign trailing behind Democrat Hillary Clinton.

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DONALD TRUMP: I don't believe the polls anymore. I don't believe them.

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