Election 2016

Ways to Connect

Just one week from Election Day, the FBI has made a somewhat puzzling release of information related to a controversial pardon Bill Clinton made on his last day in office almost 16 years ago.

On Tuesday, the law enforcement agency released documents related to the former president's pardon of Marc Rich, a former hedge-fund manager who had been indicted on multiple counts of tax evasion, wire fraud and racketeering.

For more than 30 years, conservative evangelical Christians have been tied to the Republican Party. While the pattern seems to be holding this year, with most conservative white Christians supporting Donald Trump, some evangelical leaders are now questioning the logic behind the political alliance.

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A week away from Election Day, Democrats still have multiple paths to winning back the Senate. Meanwhile, Republicans are hoping that new revelations about possible new Hillary Clinton emails related to her private server can only bolster the "check and balance" argument they need to make for voters to separate their GOP candidates from the top of the ticket.

Donald Trump is continuing his homestretch campaign strategy of trying to stay on message. As the Clinton campaign also tries to focus on issues and policy in the heat of another FBI investigation, Trump rolled out his health care plan for the country. Noticeably, Hillary Clinton was largely absent from his speech Tuesday in Valley Forge, Pa.

In the end, Paul Ryan voted for Donald Trump.

The Republican presidential nominee and the House speaker have had a tortured relationship with each other all year. After Trump became the GOP's presumptive candidate, Ryan held off on endorsing him for several weeks.

Nothing says how hard tradition is to break than the day Americans vote — Tuesday.

It's inconvenient. Most people work on Tuesdays and polls are mostly open during business hours. They're most crowded early in the morning before people leave for work and in the early evening after work and just before they close. It's not exactly like polling places have retail hours; they're more like extended banking hours.

White evangelicals are reliable Republican voters. They also have a long history of demanding that politicians exemplify character and morality in public life.

So for many, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump presents a moral dilemma.

Come next Tuesday, millions of people will stand in line to vote; last presidential cycle, about 57.5 percent of eligible voters cast ballots. Still, that means nearly half did not. Many people stay away from the polls because they run out of time, or have a work conflict — in which case lacking paid time off to vote might be a factor.

Paid leave to vote is covered by a patchwork of laws around the country.

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Silicon Valley is a politically liberal place — and that is reflected in where people are sending their money this election season. Ninety-five percent of contributions from tech employees to the presidential campaigns have gone to Hillary Clinton, according to Crowdpac, a group that tracks political donations.

But one well-known outlier has caused a lot of friction in the Valley.

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FBI Director James Comey's letter to Congress reporting a renewed look into emails that could be related to Hilary Clinton's private server rocked the presidential race on Friday.

The Clinton campaign and supporters have jumped on Comey for making such a dramatic announcement so close to an election. The question being raised now is whether the timing and style of the announcement make it illegal.

Susan Walsh, File / AP Photo

Today on a special edition of "Political Rewind," our panel of political insiders uncover the latest after a letter sent to Congress from Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation James Comey informed lawmakers that the bureau is once again looking into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server. In the 3-paragraph letter Comey announced the FBI had recently obtained materials that could be related to the previous investigation into Clinton's handling of classified material. 

 

 

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Every week we get emails and tweets from people who say they are so appalled by this year's election campaign they no can longer pay attention to the news. Then they often go on to give us full details about the latest incident in the campaign that's so repulsed them.

A lot of Americans say they are disgusted by this year's election. And the data says they can't get enough of it.

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It's time now for a Platform Check - when we examine what Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump say they would do if they become president.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

HILLARY CLINTON: Raise the national minimum wage so people...

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Today on "Political Rewind," we head to the campus of Georgia State University to hear from college voters. In an election where voter turnout can have serious implications, we try to uncover the source behind the uncommitted feelings of the millennial vote. How are students, many first time voters, planning to cast their ballot on November 8?

Less than two weeks out from Election Day, the gender gap appears to be bigger than ever.

Polls show Hillary Clinton with a 19 point lead over Donald Trump among likely female voters, and others indicate 79 percent of Republican women plan on voting for Trump, as opposed to the 93 percent who voted for Mitt Romney in 2012.

Hillary Clinton enters the homestretch of the presidential race with a sizable fundraising lead over Republican rival Donald Trump. Many GOP donors appear to have shifted their giving to down-ballot candidates for House and Senate. And Trump himself has contributed just over half the $100 million he pledged to help bankroll his own campaign.

Finance reports filed Thursday show Clinton's campaign raised nearly twice as much money as Trump's in the first 19 days of October and had nearly four times as much cash on hand.

Georgia voters will decide on November 8 whether the state can take over failing schools. Amendment 1 is a plan by Republican Governor Nathan Deal, in which an appointed superintendent accountable to the governor could add up to 20 low performing schools to an opportunity school district each year and either convert them into charter schools, overhaul management or close them.

The majority of schools that could be taken over are in high-poverty areas with minority students.

So, how will you vote on Amendment 1? 

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