Election 2016

Ways to Connect

Who Exactly Qualifies As A 'Bad hombre?'

Oct 21, 2016

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Donald Trump had a few memorable lines in this week's presidential debate, including this one when he was talking about border security. He said this.

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On Fridays, we spend time in The Breakroom discuss the week’s news. Guest host Adam Ragusea and the panel talk about the high level of stress Americans say they feel over the election, a new private club where women can eat chicken wings without men around to judge them, and statistics that show police body cameras dramatically reduce the number of complaints by the public.

Our Breakroom guests this week:

It was tense even before they started. Reporters tweeted that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump entered the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner from separate sides of the room, and didn't even shake hands (which at this point really isn't a surprise).

But there was hope that Thursday night's event could serve as a comedic salve for the nation following three decidedly nasty presidential debates. The fundraising event for Catholic charities — now in its 71st year — traditionally is a time for the candidates to offer jokes about themselves and their opponent.

Wooing Latino Voters On The Border In The Year Of Trump

Oct 21, 2016

Arizona's Santa Cruz County on the Mexican border is what Republican operative Sergio Arellano jokingly calls "Democrat heaven." Only 16 percent of voters are registered as Republicans. More than 80 percent of the population is Latino.

Arellano has been trying to lure more of these voters to the GOP, but this campaign season has been tricky.

"What we encounter on the grass-roots is, 'Republicans are racist. Republicans and Trump want to deport everybody, want to build the wall,'" said Arellano.

The conclusion of the 2016 election season is less than three weeks away. Candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump faced off in their final head-to-head debate on Wednesday night. And now that the verbal jousting is over, it’s time for the voters to decide who will become the 45th President of the United States.  The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has released their final poll of Georgia voters this morning.

Political reporter Greg Bluestein joins us to talk about the results of the poll and how Georgia voters are feeling about the election. 

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Cybersecurity has plagued this presidential election like no other in U.S. history. Earlier this week, the Obama administration indicated its plans to retaliate against Russia, in some way, for cyberattacks. Hacking came up, again, in the final presidential debate. Yet neither candidate is offering a roadmap for what to do on aggression, or how to handle foreign hackers.

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Maybe Janet Jackson was just sitting quietly at home Wednesday night, not even watching the debate, playing some of her old music on vinyl, counting her money, reflecting on her influence on popular music and culture.

Or maybe she was watching. Maybe she's a political junkie. Or perhaps, just like the rest of us, she just can't take her eyes off the train wreck Election 2016 has become.

Tens of millions of Americans gathered around TV sets to watch the debate last night. But how they thought it went may depend upon which networks they watched. That's because post-debate coverage can sway viewers' opinions, as a new study suggests.

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Donald Trump is far behind Hillary Clinton among women voters.

In last night’s debate he had an opportunity to convince women to vote for him.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michelle Bernard, president and CEO of the Bernard Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy, about whether Trump was able to appeal to women.

In front of an exuberant crowd Thursday in Delaware, Ohio, Donald Trump again addressed whether he would accept the outcome of the November election.

"Ladies and gentleman I want to make a major announcement today," Trump said, continuing, "I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters, and to all of the people of the United States, that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election ..."

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton shook hands with moderator Chris Wallace and greeted their families after the end of Wednesday night's presidential debate, the broadcast hosts delivered their verdict.

"All six of the 15-minute segments — total home runs for him," said Cliff Sims. "I think this was really the performance that Donald Trump needed to grab that momentum going toward the election."

His co-host, Boris Epshteyn, agreed: "He prosecuted the case against Hillary Clinton perfectly."

Donald Trump at Wednesday's presidential debate refused to say whether he would honor the results of the Nov. 8 election. But is that just a tease meant to build suspense?

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine tells Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep he doubts that.

In the final presidential debate, Donald Trump said he supports the federal ban on "partial-birth" abortion because, under the procedure, "in the ninth month you can take the baby and rip the baby out of the womb of the mother."

He added that this can happen "as late as one or two or three or four days prior to birth."

But that is not at all likely.

Divided States: Florida Voters Roundtable

Oct 20, 2016

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was noncommittal when he was asked if he would accept the results of the November elections.

"I will keep you in suspense," Trump said during the final presidential debate. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton said she was "appalled" by his response.

Here's the clip:

During the final presidential debate, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump clashed over Russia.

Responding to a question about one of her speeches released by WikiLeaks, Clinton pivoted by saying Trump should disavow Russia. Trump responded by saying it would not be a bad thing if Russia and the United States got along and that Russian President Vladimir Putin has no respect for Clinton.

"That's because he'd rather have a puppet as president," Clinton replied, sparking one of the fiercest confrontations during the debate thus far.

Here's the clip:

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was overall more cordial and more policy-focused than their nasty second debate faceoff. But the stunning moment that will stand out is the GOP nominee's statement that he won't necessarily accept the results of the election on Nov. 8.

"I will tell you at the time," Trump said in a shocking statement that signals a break from the traditional transfer of power. "I will keep you in suspense."

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