Emory

Heidi Vreeland / Duke University

In a recently published study, researchers at Georgia Tech, Emory and Duke examined pollution levels drivers are exposed to inside their vehicles during rush hour in Atlanta. Counter to their expectations, researchers found that drivers are exposed to a significant amount of dangerous pollutants during those times.

Daniel LaChance

A new book by Emory History Professor Daniel LaChance tackles the changing perception of capital punishment in America. He argues the court trial, the sentencing, and the execution process are all deeply societal events that reflect the public’s relationship with government. Daniel LaChance joins us in studio.

©Nina Subin

Dominican-American novelist Junot Diaz published “The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” a decade ago. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007. When he’s not writing, he teaches college students--he formerly taught Freedom University here in Georgia, which offers post-secondary education to undocumented immigrants.

We speak with Junot Diaz ahead of a lecture at Emory University at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 12th.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

Georgia lawmakers have approved a bill banning private colleges and universities from adopting so-called "sanctuary" policies.

The measure would block state scholarship and research funding from institutions that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

Emory Law Journal Elects First Black Editor-In-Chief

Mar 7, 2017
Emory Law School

Since its inception in 1952, the Emory Law Journal has never elected a black editor-in-chief — until now.

The college announced Wednesday that Emory University School of Law student Janiel Myers was named to the Journal's highest role.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports () Myers was born in Jamaica and recently naturalized as an American citizen. Myers says she hopes her appointment will help impact the future of diversity at the law school.

What It Means To Teach 'Black Self-Love'

Jan 11, 2017
Aiyanna Sanders

A new course at Emory University entitled “The Power of Black Self-Love” teaches the history and culture of African-American lives. It explores the ideas behind self-confidence, social movements, and celebratory spaces fostered through social media. 

In the studio are class co-creators Dianne Stewart, Associate Professor of Religion & African American Studies at Emory, and Donna Troka, Assistant Professor at the Institute for the Liberal Arts there. We’re also be joined by student Gretel Nabeta, a junior at Emory.

The Senate is expected to vote this afternoon on the 21st Century Cures Act. It is considered landmark legislation that would provide funding for research programs like Vice President Joe Biden’s moonshot against cancer.

It will also make significant changes in how drugs are tested and approved.

The act passed in the House overwhelmingly and is expected to easily pass the Senate as well.

OST

 The NFL pre-season began last week for all 32 teams, including the Atlanta Falcons. The Dirty Birds are hoping to shake off last year’s mediocre 8-8 season. The Falcons will head across the street to Mercedes-Benz stadium after this season, so will their last year in the Georgia Dome be a memorable one? We ask GPB sports correspondent Jon Nelson what he thinks of the Falcon’s chances this year and their prospects for the future. 

Emory Holds Vigil For Students Killed In Bangladesh

Jul 7, 2016
Jayla Moody / GPB

The Emory community gathered today at an interfaith vigil to mourn the loss of two students killed last week in a terrorist attack in Bangladesh.

Abinta Kabir and Faraaz Hossain were among 28 people murdered in a cafe in Dhaka on Friday.

Militants stormed the restaurant and held hostages for 10 hours before paramilitary forces ended the siege.

Lyn Pace is the Chaplain for Emory’s Oxford College. He said the community was united in its grief.

flickr.com

Millions of Americans struggle with the specter of depression in their lives. The problem spans across demographics, leaving many searching for a way to combat the mental burden. Therapy and drugs have long been the two primary ways to fight depression, but two Georgia researchers have pioneered a new method of tackling depression using magnetism. 

We talk with one of them: Emory University neurologist Charles Epstein.