fake news

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After the shooting at the Capitol Gazette in Annapolis two weeks ago, journalists are questioning what free press means to American society. 


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Why do so many of us fall for fake news? Nearly 1 in 4 Americans admit they've shared fake political news stories on line, according to the Pew Research Center. Some of them said they did it despite knowing the information was false.


Screenshot by GPB

Type any word into Google, and the search engine will offer a drop-down list of suggestions for what you should type next. So if you type "Russia collusion," Google suggests you complete your search with "delusion."

 


The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

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Last month, Georgia Broadcast Hall of Famer Judy Woodruff was named sole anchor of PBS NewsHour.

Woodruff began her journalism career as a reporter in Atlanta. Since her early days in broadcast journalism, she has covered presidential campaigns and the White House. 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

We spend the full hour exploring how journalism is changing in the age of President Trump. Host Celeste Headlee recently led a panel discussion on how journalism has changed in the time of the Trump administration, presented by the Columbia Journalism Review. 

Updated at 2:17 p.m. ET, Oct. 3

Facebook said on Monday it has given Congress thousands of ads linked with Russian influence operations in the United States and is tightening its policies to make such interference more difficult.

"Many [of the ads] appear to amplify racial and social divisions," it said.

The social media giant confirmed that it discovered the ad sales earlier this year and gave copies to Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election.