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Today on “Two Way Street,” Emily Saliers tells us about her first solo album, “Murmuration Nation.” For more than 30 years, she’s been one half of the beloved musical duo, Indigo Girls. Saliers and her bandmate, Amy Ray, have been playing music together since attending high school together in Decatur. Throughout their career, Ray has released six solo records.

We start with the question that’s on everyone’s mind: What took Saliers so long to produce her own album?

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Saporta Report

 

For more than forty years, the city of Atlanta has been led by an African-American mayor.

 

Maynard Jackson started the trend in 1974, becoming the first black mayor elected in a major southern city.

The man who preceded Jackson was Sam Massell, who made history of his own in 1970 when he became the first Jewish mayor of Atlanta.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The Georgia Tech community is left with many questions after a student leader was fatally shot by campus police last weekend.

Scout Schultz was a fourth-year engineering student from Lilburn, Georgia, and president of Georgia Tech’s Pride Alliance.

 

Last Saturday evening, police say Schultz called 911 to report a person armed with a knife and potentially a gun.

School officials say Schultz then encountered campus police and ignored repeated commands to drop a multipurpose tool. Officer Tyler Beck, a 16-month veteran of the campus police force, fired a single shot, and Scout Schultz later died at the hospital.

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk to two Georgia mayors: Rusty Paul, the Republican mayor of Sandy Springs and Teresa Tomlinson, the Democratic mayor of Columbus. What problems do they share in common? Lack of modern infrastructure? A need for a better mix of transportation options? Affordable housing? Do they believe Georgia is on the right track for growth?

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talked with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Christopher Kimball is one the biggest names in cooking. Best known as the longtime host of the popular TV and radio show, “America’s Test Kitchen,” he also published the magazine “Cook’s Illustrated.” Last year, he launched a new project called “Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street.” The Boston-based venture teaches cooking, publishes a magazine, and produces a TV show.

Jeff Roberson / AP Photo

The rate of Americans with epilepsy is continuing to rise, based on new data from The Centers For Disease Control And Prevention. The data is the first report to get complete epilepsy numbers from every state. It finds more than 3.4 million adults and children now have epilepsy. We talk about this issue with Rosemarie Kobau, a Health Scientist with the CDC. And Joseph Sirven, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and Editor at Epilepsy.com.  

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talk with Atlanta-Journal Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Gucci Mane has an extensive resume. As a founding father of trap music, Mane's been carving out the rap genre since 2001 when he put out his first underground release: Str8 Drop Records Presents Gucci Mane La Flare. Since then, he has amassed a long list of musical achievements: dozens of mixtapes, singles, collaborations and eight studio albums.

Authorities say three people have been arrested after an eruption of violence on Georgia Tech's campus Monday night. The clash, which broke out during a vigil for a 21-year-old student shot and killed Saturday by police, left officers with minor injuries and one police vehicle damaged by fire.

Georgia Wants To Execute Inmates Accused Of Killing Guards

Sep 19, 2017
Bob Andres / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool

Two inmates accused of killing their guards on a Georgia prison bus three months ago were indicted Tuesday on multiple charges, including murder, and the state plans to seek the death penalty.

A grand jury indicted Donnie Russell Rowe, 44, and Ricky Dubose, 24. Each man faces two counts of murder, two counts of felony murder, one count of escape and one count of hijacking a motor vehicle.

Ocmulgee Judicial Circuit District Attorney Stephen Bradley filed notice with the court Tuesday that he plans to seek the death penalty against both men.

3 People Charged With Inciting Riot After Georgia Tech Vigil

Sep 19, 2017
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Three people face charges of inciting a riot and battery of an officer after violent clashes with campus police at Georgia Tech following a vigil for a student fatally shot by officers, a university spokesman said Tuesday.

Police shot and killed Scout Schultz, 21, Saturday night after the student himself called 911 to report an armed and possibly intoxicated suspicious person, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said.

Georgia Tech hasn't identified the officer who fired the fatal shot and has refused to release any information about the officers who confronted Schultz.

Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

Courtesy of Theatre Macon

Theatre Macon has fostered talent in Middle Georgia for over three decades. Founding Artistic Director Jim Crisp has been with the theater since its inception 32 years ago. He announced this summer he would retire at the end of the upcoming season. We talk with Crisp about the legacy of the theater in Macon, and his work on hundreds of stage productions. 

Learning From Life's Failures

Sep 19, 2017
Patch.com

Failure is a fact of life. We’ve all been there: whether it’s as simple as tripping over your own feet, or as serious as dealing with a divorce. Atlanta author Amy Lyle wants to share, so people can laugh at -- and learn from -- her own life’s failings.

FX Networks

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant-Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

The night started as a sea of candles reflecting off the Georgia Tech Campanile fountain and ended with the bright orange glow of a burned-out patrol car.

Photos From Music Midtown '17: Sunday

Sep 18, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

Music Midtown is a wrap! Headliners included Haim, Mumford & Sons, and Young The Giant. See the last day of bands in the slideshow above.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” health care is back in the political headlines. Insurance companies are warning that rates are about to skyrocket – in part because of the uncertainty about how the Trump administration intends to support Obamacare. Tom Price is making dramatic cuts in money to help educate consumers on buying insurance from the exchanges, which critics say suppress registrations for insurance.

Meanwhile on Capitol Hill there’s a new GOP push to repeal and replace the ACA. Will it go anywhere?

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

Nicole Abalde / flickr

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A new book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book, Cook & Tell. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

 

GPB News

As the world comes to grips with the unprecedented damage of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, millions of Americans in the southeastern United States are working to rebuild their lives. Irma crossed into Georgia in the early morning hours of Monday, September 11, 2017. Over the next 24 hours, water inundated island and beach communities over 100 miles of coastline. Winds topping 69 miles per hour toppled trees and power lines. 1.1 million Georgians lost power and three lost their lives.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Governor Deal returns from a statewide inspection of damage from Hurricane Irma. He says the federal government has pledged support in the restoration effort. But how do requests for federal aid rub against conservative principles calling for a reduction in government spending? Our panel weighs in on the issue.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the week’s news, including the success of the horror film “IT” and Harvard admissions. We’ll also talk about Amazon’s new HQ, and the Equifax hack. Joining us in the Breakroom are Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest. Stephen Brown, and Christian Zsilavetz.

The B-52s made it big. And the iconic band from Athens takes the stage in their home state tonight, Sept. 15, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall. We revisit an interview with founding member Kate Pierson.

Hurricane Irma put a lot of lives on hold. But for Jacob Gmitter of Lakeland, Florida, there was one thing that just couldn’t wait. GPB reporter Grant Blankenship brings us the story of a young saxophonist on the road.

Commentary: Climate Change Missing From Storm Coverage

Sep 15, 2017

The constant media coverage of Hurricane Irma kept people up to speed on the storm’s intensity and the damage it caused. But journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News says there was one thing most of the coverage was missing

the artist

The B-52s have been a major part of Georgia’s music scene since the 1970s, when it formed in Athens.

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