Georgia

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On today’s show, we’re going to talk about something that’s completely free of charge but that many, many people might call the most valuable commodity in the world: sleep. It’s supposed to be a restful and restorative process. So why does it produce such anxiety?

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” remember the guy spinning plates on Ed Sullivan? We figured that’s what Washington must have felt like today with the GOP health care bill up for a vote but in the midst of our discussion on whether the bill would pass or fail, news broke that it had been pulled from consideration!

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, Bee Nguyen of Athena’s Warehouse, Ed Sohn of Thomson Reuters, and Natalie Dale of the Georgia Department of Transportation.

 

Breakroom Topics:

Gwinnet County Sheriff's Office

On March 18, a pair of Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office deputies allegedly stole items from a storage area without permission.

Corporal Ronnie Rodriguez and Deputy Jason Cowburn were arrested by Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office investigators on March 22 and charged with theft of county property. Investigators did not specify what was taken, but arrest warrants valued the property between $1,500 and $5,000.

Revised Georgia Redistricting Plans Face Strong Public Opposition

Mar 24, 2017
Robert Wilson / Flickr/CC

GOP lawmakers on a key Senate committee approved a revision Friday of controversial redistricting plans, but Democrats and others accused Republicans of lacking transparency.

"It was rushed through and nobody saw the maps until this morning. We didn't have time to get public input," said Sen. Steve Hensen, D-Stone Mountain. He complained that the committee chairman didn't share the new maps with the minority before the meeting.

UGA

University of Georgia officials say they plan a public talk about human remains found during a campus construction project, and about the history of slavery at the institution.

Workers on a campus construction project discovered the first of the remains from more than 100 burial sites in late 2015, on land that was once part of Athens' main burial ground. The remains were reinterred at an Athens cemetery.

Was 'House Full Of Girls' A Business Or Criminal Enterprise?

Mar 24, 2017
Fulton County Detention Center

A Georgia man forced women he held at a million-dollar mansion to get gang-related tattoos, collected all the money they made at a strip club and threatened them if they wanted to leave, a prosecutor said Thursday.

But a lawyer for Kenndric Roberts, 33, said his client simply "had grand designs to become a very wealthy person," never held the women against their will, showered them with lavish gifts and promised to share profits from his entertainment company.

Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home on Facebook

Find plenty of spring fun in Savannah with the help of Do Savannah's Heather Henley and G100's Mia Amini.

In the last year, a nonprofit abortion and birth control clinic on the East Coast has expanded its presence in the South by opening two clinics in Georgia. The group is called Carafem, and it’s also trying to reduce the stigma around abortion through an aggressive media campaign. We talk with Melissa Grant, Carafem's vice president of health services.

Carafem

In the last year, a nonprofit abortion and birth control clinic on the East Coast has expanded its presence in the South by opening two clinics in Georgia. The group is called Carafem, and it’s also trying to reduce the stigma around abortion through an aggressive media campaign. We talked with Melissa Grant, who is Carafem's vice president of health services.

Theatrical Outfit

One of the true divas of the 20th century was singer and songwriter Nina Simone. She served as the voice for many frustrated African-Americans in the 1960s, particularly during the civil rights movement. A new musical in Atlanta called “Simply Simone” tells her story from the very beginning. It's called "Simply Simone," and it's being performed at the Theatrical Outfit. We talked with director/choreographer Patdro Harris.

After Surgery, Georgia Senator Could Miss Crucial Votes

Mar 23, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Sen. Johnny Isakson is recuperating from his second back surgery this year at his Georgia home, complicating Republican leaders' plans as they count the votes for the GOP health care overhaul and a Supreme Court nominee.

Aides to the third-term Republican senator said Wednesday that Isakson is still awaiting his physician's approval to travel back to Washington.

Atlanta Fiilm Festival

This weekend, the Atlanta Film Festival pays tribute to a courtroom classic. "My Cousin Vinny" premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. The movie, which was filmed in Monticello, Georgia, tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career  -- a murder trial. We talked with the film’s director, Jonathan Lynn. 

Leave it to Run the Jewels to find the connection between psychedelic drugs and systemic disorder. The new video for "Legend Has It," the first from the duo's third LP RTJ3, finds Killer Mike and El-P tripping on acid in a police lineup alongside a rotating cast of unusual suspects: a nun, an "innocent" little girl, a fireman, even a clown-faced police officer.

Ken Lund / Creative Commons

Today on “Political Rewind,” Georgians didn't approve Governor Deal's Opportunity School District measure last November, so what education reform bills will come out of the Gold Dome this session? The AJC's "Get Schooled" writer Maureen Downey joins us to take a look at some of the key efforts.

FLICKR

You soon might be able to walk into your favorite local brewery and order up a pint or grab a six pack to take home.

 

State lawmakers have approved a bill to allow craft breweries and distilleries to sell their products directly to consumers. It passed with a vote of 52-1 in the Senate Wednesday.

 

Georgia Lawmakers OK $49 Billion Budget With Teacher Raises

Mar 22, 2017
Matt Barnett / Flickr

Georgia teachers and other state employees would get a 2 percent salary increase while staff overseeing child welfare cases will see a 19 percent raise under a state spending plan approved Wednesday by the General Assembly.

The $49 billion budget includes about $25 billion from state sources particularly income taxes; the rest is largely provided by the federal government. The spending plan for the year starting July 1 now goes to Gov. Nathan Deal, who has broad power to veto individual line-items before signing it.

YukunChen / Foter

A new form of the "campus carry" bill is advancing in the Georgia legislative session. The bill would effectively permit concealed carry of firearms on public colleges across the state. Governor Nathan Deal vetoed a similar measure in last years’ legislative session. With us to discuss the new version is Maureen Downey, education reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also with us by phone is Matthew Boedy, Professor of English at the University of North Georgia.

Crystal Hernandez

Federal data show the suicide rate among veterans has risen over the last decade. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs approached this problem with a 24-hour call center in upstate New York.

donnierayjones / Foter

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men.

Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us to talk about the findings.

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Experts Worry About Loopholes In Prescription Drug Bill

Mar 22, 2017
Frankie Leon / Flickr/CC

Georgia lawmakers have reached a compromise on a bill that would require doctors to log into a pill-tracking database before prescribing painkillers and other high-risk drugs. The goal is to curtail the overprescribing of opioids.

But critics say loopholes written into the proposal would create a false sense of accomplishment while leaving patients exposed to harm. Physician groups counter that the exceptions are necessary to reduce the burden on already strained doctors.

Strong Storms Kill 1, Damage Homes Across The South

Mar 22, 2017

Severe storms caused at least one death, damaged homes, downed trees and knocked out power as areas around the South were pounded with wind, rain and hail.

In Georgia, northeast of Atlanta, Jackson County Sheriff Janis Mangum says a man, his wife and two children were in a bedroom when a tree crashed into the home, killing the man Tuesday evening. Mangum said his wife and children survived "by the grace of God."

Gary Waters / Getty Images

No human being is free of bias, but we’re mostly unaware of them. Politicians aren’t, though, and they use our unconscious biases to convince us that what’s true is false and vice versa. Appealing to emotions, rather than reason, can be a very persuasive strategy. We talked about this tactic with Kennesaw State psychology professor Roxanne Donovan and Penn State media studies professor Shyam Sundar.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Earlier this year, President Donald Trump issued an executive order calling for sheriffs and police departments to take a larger role in immigrations enforcement.

He asked them to join a voluntary Immigrations and Customs Enforcement program called 287(g), which extends the reach of immigration agents into counties across the country.

But the program is nothing new for northwest Georgia’s Whitfield County, where one-third of the population is Hispanic.

After a nearly decade of participation by the county sheriff’s office, 287(g) still divides the community.

 

 

Courtesy Peter Bergen

Today on “Political Rewind” we spend the full hour with terrorism expert Peter Bergen. The author of "The United States of Jihad," Bergen is an authority on the topic. In addition to being CNN's Terror Analyst, Bergen is one of the few Western journalists to have interviewed Osama bin Laden in 1997. In the era of travel bans targeting mostly Muslim nations, Bergen says his research shows that the terrorists are already among us, like the Tsarnaev brothers who masterminded the Boston Marathon bombings. They may have been born here, or they may be naturalized U.S.

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss. Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

j_v_tran / Foter

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss.

Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

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