Georgia

Ways to Connect

Trump Unleashes Twitter Attack Against John Lewis

Jan 14, 2017

Donald Trump tore into civil rights legend John Lewis for questioning the legitimacy of the Republican billionaire's White House victory, intensifying a feud with the black congressman days before the national holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and as the first African-American president prepares to leave office.

I’m really thrilled about this edition of “Two Way Street.” For some time, we’ve hoped to coax into our studio a man who became one of the important leaders of print and broadcast journalism in the 20th and early 21st centuries. We finally persuade Tom Johnson to join us and share stories about his life and career.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we're just a week away from the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States--and if the last few days are any indication, we’re in for a wild ride.  

Macon-Bibb County officials have met in the past year to discuss why there are so many pedestrian fatalities in the area. The Georgia Department of Public Health found the county has the second highest rate of pedestrian deaths in the state. We speak with Macon-Bibb Board of Health member Chris Tsavatewa about what needs to be done to address this problem. We also hear from Angie Schmitt, editor of Streetsblog USA, about how pedestrian fatalities look across the country.

The Breakroom gang is back in action. We talk about why people feel the need to raid grocery stores before an impending storm, how ParkAtlanta has issued tons of bogus parking tickets, and the Pope’s recent decision to give the go-ahead for women to breastfeed in church.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

A favorite pastime for many people is playing with model trains. It can be exciting to watch them whiz by on tiny tracks. Recently, model train enthusiasts of all stripes came to Atlanta for a the World's Greatest Hobby on Tour, a show promoting model railroading across all gauges for all ages. GPB’s Sean Powers stopped by and sent us this audio postcard.

This weekend, shows from folk duo Mark Mandeville and Raianne Richards, Austin's Greyhounds opening for Drivin' and Cryin', Decatur band Biteroots and a math rock extravaganza at the Fresh Produce Music Hall. 

Back when Republican Scott Walker was competing for the presidential nomination, one of his aides came under fire after she posted a series of unflattering tweets about Iowa and its politics. Republicans in the Hawkeye State objected and within 24 hours, she resigned. This story gained national attention because of Iowa’s powerful role in the presidential nomination process. But would the outcome have been different if it was another state? That’s what Washington Post reporter Philip Bump set out to answer.

Jimmy Carter Close To Guinea Worm Eradication

Jan 12, 2017
Robert Jimison / GPB

Former President Jimmy Carter says that Guinea worm may soon be the second human disease eradicated in modern history. At an event held at The Carter Center on Wednesday, the former president announced that his initiative, that started over 30 years ago, has reached a major milestone with only 25 reported cases of Guinea worm in 2016.

Telfair Museums

Enjoy a fun long weekend in Savannah with some help from Art Rise Savannah's Clinton Edminster and the Tourism Leadership Council's Molly Swagler.

Molly's picks:

PIXBAY

The city of Stockbridge has voted to ban smoking inside vehicles when children are present in a 3-2 vote during Monday night’s council meeting.

The trend towards banning smoking in vehicles where children are passengers is growing.  According to the Public Health Law Center there are eight states plus Puerto Rico that have such bans.  Georgia is not one of them.

 

Georgia Southern and Armstrong State Universities will combine under the name Georgia Southern University. The state Board of Regents approved the consolidation Wednesday.

Armstrong students and alumni have been critical of the plan, pointing to Armstrong's history in Savannah and the distance between the schools.

Seth Wenig / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” no shortage of news! President-elect Donald Trump gave his first press conference in six months ... under a new cloud of controversy over unsubstantiated, but widely discussed, reports that Russia has been gathering potentially damaging information about Trump for years. Is this another example of "fake news," or do the reports bear further investigation? 

A problem with some fantasy fiction narratives is the misogynistic treatment of female characters. The sci-fi world may still be very much dominated by men behind the scenes, but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been female trailblazers. A new book explores some of those unsung heroines.

A new study from the University of Georgia shows birds, like White Ibises, have a high risk of contracting and spreading Salmonella in congested areas like urban parks. The study furthermore suggests feeding of these birds corrupts their ecosystem, and hopes to dissuade pedestrians and city planners from creating this mutually harmful environment. We’ll speak with researcher Dr. Sonia Hernandez. She’s an Associate Professor at the School of Forestry and Natural Resources and College of Veterinary Medicine at UGA.

What It Means To Teach 'Black Self-Love'

Jan 11, 2017
Aiyanna Sanders

A new course at Emory University entitled “The Power of Black Self-Love” teaches the history and culture of African-American lives. It explores the ideas behind self-confidence, social movements, and celebratory spaces fostered through social media. 

In the studio are class co-creators Dianne Stewart, Associate Professor of Religion & African American Studies at Emory, and Donna Troka, Assistant Professor at the Institute for the Liberal Arts there. We’re also be joined by student Gretel Nabeta, a junior at Emory.

cuatrok77 / Foter

A new study from the University of Georgia shows birds, like White Ibises, have a high risk of contracting and spreading Salmonella in congested areas like urban parks. The study furthermore suggests feeding of these birds corrupts their ecosystem, and hopes to dissuade pedestrians and city planners from creating this mutually harmful environment.

We speak with researcher Dr. Sonia Hernandez. She’s an Associate Professor at the School of Forestry and Natural Resources and College of Veterinary Medicine at UGA. 

Palladium Theater Stuttgart/A. Sauerbrunn

There's a measure before the Atlanta City Council that would impose tougher restrictions on newly built music recording studios.

Supporters say it addresses problems with noise in residential areas. Studio owners are calling it misinformed and harmful to Atlanta's $4 billion music industry and 80 privately-owned studios.

More than two-thirds of Americans don’t use a budget. But whenever they poll young people on what they wish they learned in school, basic money management ends up in the top 10. Host Celeste Headlee learned about budgeting the hard way - by making disastrous financial decisions. She was never taught the difference between compound interest and simple interest. So, she takes us inside her home for a look at how she’s teaching her son to budget. Plus, we talk to Sherilyn Narker of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta about why it’s important to budget.

Sean MacEntee / flickr

A new report slots Georgia third in the nation for credit card debt. The website Creditcards.com figured the average credit card debt and median income in each state, and in this case, being high on the list is bad news. We talked more about this with Atlanta financial advisor Cecily Welch.

Stefano Brega / flickr

Pigs are a huge part of Georgia’s economy. They can also cause a lot of problems. A University of Georgia report last year says feral swine caused nearly $99 million in crop damage and $51 million in non-crop damage in 2014. But that doesn’t mean we should hate these animals.

Georgia 2017 Legislative Session Preview

Jan 9, 2017
WIKIPEDIA COMMONS

Today on “Political Rewind,” we preview the 2017 session of the Georgia General Assembly. As the lawmakers gavel in for the first of 40 days, we look at some new polling from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It suggests that the majority of Georgia voters oppose renewed efforts to pass religious liberty and campus carry bills, but their support for Medicaid expansion is strong, even among GOP respondents. Other topics include an update on the Trump transition, and the latest round in the culture wars as award-winning actress Meryl Streep turns an acceptance speech at the Golden Globes into a shot across the bow at the incoming U.S. President.   

pburka / Foter

The Georgia Lottery has recently come under audit by the state government. News broke last week that the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts was questioning the Georgia Lottery Corporation’s spending practices.

 

Bread for the World / Foter

The Georgia Legislature, House and Senate, both have a chaplain. They are usually Protestant Christians, who starts every day with a short devotional and prayer. It is a long-hallowed tradition. Legislators invite the speakers.

But our state’s religious profile is constantly changing. That change raises the question: should there be more faiths represented in these daily prayers? Or, should there even be a religious ceremony in a place where laws are made?

The Georgia Legislature, House and Senate, both have a chaplain. They are usually Protestant Christians, who starts every day with a short devotional and prayer. It is a long-hallowed tradition. Legislators invite the speakers.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnapped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

Georgia County's Llama On The Lam

Jan 7, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Keenan Jones / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, Soumaya Khalifa ​of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, and Natalie Pawelski of of Cater Communications.

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Actress Issa Rae got the attention of many audiences in 2011 with her popular Web series, "The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl." Five years later, her latest project is an HBO series called "Insecure.” Rae is up for a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy TV Series this Sunday. We revisit a conversation with Rae about her new show and what she wishes she could tell her dad.

Jonathan Splitlog

Atlanta-based songwriter Anthony Aparo is best known as the front man for the band Culture Culture and a performer for the local collaboration ATL Collective. Anthony is featured in an upcoming GPB Music Session, and gave us two more tunes for our essential Georgia Playlist. Picks include songs by OutKast and Drivin’ n Cryin’. 

Pages