Georgia

Ways to Connect

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

  • Deal Closes Government Offices Thursday
  • Winter Weather Travel Woes
  • Georgia Power To Refund Millions

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Sean Powers/GPB

  • Winter Weather Makes Driving Dangerous
  • Delta Cancels Flights 
  • PSC Orders Georgia Power Refund

Snow Moves On, But Chilly Tempratures Persist

Jan 16, 2018
Sean Powers/GPB

UPDATE 1/17 2:25 p.m.

 

State government offices will remain closed tomorrow, as Georgia deals with the aftermath of snow and ice.

 

A county coroner says two people have been killed in a crash on an icy stretch of Interstate 75.

  • Winter Weather
  • Bribery Scandal Sentencing
  • Girl Scouts Lobbying For Bridge Name Change

STEPHEN FOWLER / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Last September, Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot to death by a campus police officer. According to investigators, Schultz called 911 to report an armed suspicious person on campus. When police arrived, they found Schultz holding a blade. After repeated commands to drop it, an officer opened fire. Schultz, who was suicidal, was one of 30 Georgians shot and killed by police last year.

JIM MELVIN / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

For a while, Purple Ribbon Sugarcane thrived on Sapelo Island, off the Georgia coast. Then, disease nearly wiped it out altogether in North America, but it’s been brought back, thanks to a team of farmers, geneticists, and historians.

  •  Winter Weather Headed Our Way
  • Sen. Perdue Defends President Trump
  • Sen. Isakson Proposed Peace Corp Health Care Upgrade

LA Johnson / NPR

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. Under DACA, some 800,000 young immigrants, often referred to as "Dreamers," can legally live and work in the U.S. One of those Dreamers is Valentina Emilia Garcia Gonzalez, who moved from Uruguay to Gwinnett County. She told us how the DACA program has helped her.

Today's headlines:

  • Winter weather heading to North Georgia and Metro Atlanta
  • David Perdue denies Trump's derogatory comments towards African countries
  • UGA's Roquan Smith declares for the NFL Draft

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Monday, January 15, 2018 would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 89th birthday. His legacy remains strong. Nearly a decade after his death in 1968, President Jimmy Carter awarded Dr. King the posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. Producer Sean Powers takes us back to that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

  •  Fake Checks In Marietta
  • Gwinnett County Commission Sued
  • Falcons Face Eagles

  •  Sen. Perdue On Immigration
  • Mayor's New Transition Team
  • Falcons Vs. Eagles

Hayes Buchanan / Creative Loafing

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnaped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

Sean Powers / GPB

The Breakroom gang has a lot of news to cover this week. We’ll talk about Oprah’s impassioned Golden Globes speech, why more college students are finding sugar daddies, and what UGA’s big loss means for Georgia football fans. We also look at the rising popularity of cassette tapes, wonder if cash is going out of style, and ask if kids are spending too much time on smart phones. Joining us in the Breakroom are Natalie Pawelski, Charles Richardson, Sam Burnham, and Amber Scott.

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines. Creative Loafing announced last month it would cut its staff, after transitioning from weekly to monthly earlier in the year. We talk about the role of alternative magazines with Keith Herndon, Professor of Journalism at the University of Georgia. He is also author of the book, ‘The Decline of the Daily Newspaper.’

Tim Wilkerson

Mozart’s Magic Flute is a great first opera for children. In additional to magical instruments, it’s got a prince on a rescue mission, a funny but lonely birdcatcher, a high-strung Queen of the Night, wild animals and trials by water and fire.

Today's news:

  • Governor Deal recaps his time in office in the State of the State of address
  • Falcons prepare for second round playoff matchup against Eagles
  • Gwinnett Commissioner Tommy Hunter threatens lawsuit after public reprimand

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are at the Georgia State Capitol for Governor Nathan Deal’s final State of the State address.  What are his plans for restoring economic vitality to rural Georgia communities?  What about expanded transit in metro Atlanta?  How will he cap his progressive reforms in the criminal justice system?  And, what does he see as his legacy accomplishments?  Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, House Speaker David Ralston and others stop by to react to the speech.

Panelists:

We’ve all seen it: somebody shops on their work computer, or takes really long lunches, or “borrows” supplies. The workplace doesn’t always foster the most ethical behavior. But recent University of Georgia research shows it can get worse than that. Many employees lie on their timesheets, and even trash their co-workers to get ahead. We discuss with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. And Karen Rommelfanger, a professor from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University.

  • Gov. Deal State Of The State Address
  • New GA Adoption Law
  • First Latino Mayor In Gwinnett

Blessings in a Bookbag on Facebook

Looking to have a fun weekend in Savannah? Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag and Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar have some ideas.

Marianne's picks:

-You can shop for a cause at Whole Foods Thursday, when five percent of sales will benefit the Forsyth Farmers' Market. Thursday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

  • Gov. Deal Delivers State Of The State Address
  • GA Adoption Law Revisited
  • Rep. Buddy Carter Talks Off-Shore Drilling

In today's headlines:

-Governor Deals says Georgia is a top competitor for Amazon's HQ2

-Gwinnett swears in it's first Latino mayor

-APD faces federal allegations of evidence tampering and excessive force

GPB: Taylor Gantt

 

Gwinnett County is fast becoming one of the most diverse areas in all of Georgia, and even throughout the southeast.

 

The county has been experiencing a cultural shift over the years.  

 

In fact, white residents no longer make up the majority of the county’s registered voters, and last year’s elections are proof of that.

 

In Norcross, councilman Craig Newton became Gwinnett’s first-ever black mayor.

 

 

  • Gov. Deal's Amazon Incentive Plan
  • Sexual Assault Bill Moves Forward
  • $2-Million Gift To APS

SpaceX continues to make headlines, sending its Falcon rockets into space and if Georgia has its way, those rockets could soon blast off from Camden County.

A public report on Camden County’s bid for a spaceport came out recently. Laura Forczyk is an author of it, and the owner of Astralytical. The Atlanta-based consulting firm is working on Camden County’s plans for a launch site.

 

Pages