georgia legislature

On this edition of Political Rewind, we are live from the Georgia State Capitol for Crossover Day.  Which crucial bills will die and which will live to see another day?  Among the measures hanging in the balance: a bill to keep guns out of the hands of Georgians with mental illness and a tax break for Delta Airlines that’s now caught up in the highly charged gun control debate. 


AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson

Republican Insider Jackie Cushman

On this edition of Political Rewind, to bring high speed internet to rural Georgia, legislators are looking at a broad range of taxes on services every Georgian uses, from streaming services to media downloads, even to satellite TV services.  Will the proposal fly in an election year?  Also, legislators look to impose a stiffer tax on used car purchases while also looking to bring back a tax break for electric vehicles.  As the legislative session unfolds, two GOP candidates for governor are dueling over a proposal to eliminate the state income tax. 


On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a


The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention under the Gold Dome translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.


AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.


On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists: Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

Wikimedia Commons / Ken Lund.

Georgia lawmakers convene the second week of January. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Governor Signs Medical Marijuana Expansion On Final Day

May 10, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal approved an expansion of the state's medical marijuana program on Tuesday, allowing people being treated for six additional medical conditions to possess cannabis oil.

The new qualifying conditions include autism, AIDS, Tourette's syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease. Patients must register with the state to be eligible and have a doctor's permission.


Governor Nathan Deal has vetoed a bill that would have made changes to the state’s adoption laws.

It’s one of the nine bills he blocked Tuesday, the deadline for the governor to take action on legislation passed by the General Assembly this year.