Georgia State University

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For the last five years, Georgia State University has awarded more bachelor's degrees to African-Americans than any other nonprofit college or university in the country. Serving more than 30,000 students — GSU became the state's largest university in 2015, when it merged with Georgia Perimeter College — the university has also brought up its graduation rate by more than 20 percent since 2003. So how did GSU get to be a paragon of personalizing education for all students? 


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Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


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  • GSU Will Redo Rained Out Graduation Ceremony

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As students prepare for college, they have a big concern: the cost.

 

The Institute for Higher Education Policy finds 70 percent of colleges unaffordable for lower-income and middle-income students. That’s if they don’t take out a student loans.

New research on anxiety in the workplace finds in some cases, anxiety can actually help improve employee performance. Georgia State University psychology professor Page Anderson developed a technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. The software simulates real life settings that cause patients anxiety, helping them learn to cope before they have to confront the same scenarios in the real world. 

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This week we talked about racist robots, climate change and autism awareness. So, as we do every Friday, we sat down with our Breakroom guests to process the week's biggest news stories.  We were joined in the studio by Georgia State University professors Héctor Fernández, Soumaya Khalifa, executive director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, Fayette County commissioner Steve Brown and Korea Daily reporter HB Cho. 

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Most studies suggest married people are happier than singles. But new research from Georgia State University points to an equalizer: money.  

The study looked at symptoms of mild depression. It found couples making more than $60,000 dollars a year fared the same as never-married people making that much on their own. 

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a leader in South Africa's anti-apartheid movement and ex-wife of the late Nelson Mandela, died Monday. She was 81. On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen, who grew up in South Africa, spoke with host Adam Ragusea about Madikizela-Mandela's integral role in the fight against apartheid. Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe, CEO of the TutuDesk Campaign and daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, also joined from South Carolina. Tutu-Gxashe earned her master's degree from Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. 

Dalton School Shooter Out Of Jail

Fiat Chrysler Loses $40-million Appeal

Georgia State In NCAA's This Afternoon

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Urban archeology has unearthed centuries-old artifacts from beneath Atlanta. And lots of it is simply very old trash, leftover from landfills and dumps. Now, a team from Georgia State University is working with students to catalog the artifacts and teach history, writing and anthropology in the process. It’s called the Phoenix Project, and we had three of the faculty involved with it in the studio: Jeffrey Glover, Brennan Collins, and Robin Wharton.

The ongoing Atlanta bribery scandal brought a sentencing last week. Adam Smith, former chief procurement officer for Atlanta, got more than two years in jail. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been following the bribery scandal, and he joins us in the studio.

Christmas is the one holiday of the year that has the most music associated with it. Sometimes that’s a good thing. And sometimes it’s a bad thing. We wanted to get a good list of the best songs and the songs to avoid over the holidays, so we talked Chester Phillips, the director of athletic bands at Georgia State University.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Georgia college students could soon be able to apply for federal student financial aid through an app on their phone. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says the existing system needs a reboot. DeVos made the announcement at a conference of student aid professionals in Orlando. 

"We’re in the process of moving toward updating the whole FAFSA experience and making it 21st century relevant,” DeVos said.

UNODC / http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/statistics/data.html

As a nation, we’re having more tough conversations about sexual violence and harassment, as more women step forward to accuse powerful men of abusing their positions. We have profiles for killers and terrorists, what about people who commit sexual assault and rape?

David Goldman / AP Photo

The top American universities admit more students from the top one percent of earners than the bottom 60 percent combined. Those numbers contradict the U.S. News rankings, which seem to reward schools contributing to the rich-poor gap. Georgia State University is a national model for graduating low-income students, even though it dropped 30 spots in the U.S. News rankings. We talk with Tim Renick, Vice President for Student Success Programs at GSU.

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As Georgia State University and its development partners move forward on redeveloping downtown Atlanta’s Turner Field, neighbors of the former Atlanta Braves stadium are locked in a bitter struggle over how to secure things like affordable housing, green space, jobs and connectivity.

When you think of bullies, you might think of kids at school. But bullying doesn’t stop with school. A recent study shows women and minorities are most likely to be targeted in the workplace. We spoke with study authors Brandon Attell from the Health Policy Center at Georgia State University and Linda Treiber, a professor of Sociology at Kennesaw State University.

 

City Council OKs Trust Fund For Turner Field Neighborhoods

Apr 19, 2017
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The Atlanta City Council has approved legislation that would allocate money from the sale of city-owned properties around Turner Field to surrounding neighborhoods.

The bill would set up a trust fund to receive money from the sales for the use of affordable housing or job training.

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There’s a social theory in which individuals make choices to benefit the self, but ultimately harm themselves and the greater community. A new study published by researchers at Georgia Tech provides methods to combat what’s known as “tragedy of the commons.”

We speak with lead researcher and Georgia Tech Professor Joshua Weitz to talk about the implications of his counter-theory. Georgia State University sociology professor Dan Pasciuti also joins us to put the theory into a societal context. 

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