Georgia

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Emily Cureton / GPB News

Hundreds of animals and their humans have evacuated to the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricultural Center in Perry, Georgia, ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Horses are welcomed with a free stall, three bags of shavings and access to the arenas. State veterinary regulations are suspended for animals coming from Florida and within the state of Georgia. As of Saturday morning, nearly 200 horses were on site, with at least as many humans tending to them. Barn managers say the facility can hold 350 horses in stalls, but no one will be turned away.

CEMA

With evacuation information coming from both state and local officials, Chatham Emergency Management Agency held a press conference at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 9, to clarify the status of the evacuation. "No evacuation orders have been rescinded," CEMA Director Dennis Jones said. "All of Chatham County remains in an evacuation order.

Grant Blankenship

The contents of a child’s room–baby dolls, blankets, toys–line the ditch in front of Cary Westbrook’s house in Radium Springs not far outside Albany. She hasn’t lived there since January. The windows are nailed dark with nine month old plywood and the roof is gone.

 

“It’s not habitable at all. At all,” Westbrook said.

 

J. Cindy Hill

A mandatory evacuation of Tybee Island began this morning. A few cars seemed to be leaving with families, pets, bikes and surfboards loaded up. But traffic was sparse on the two-lane road that leads on and off the island.

On any other sunny Friday in September when schools and businesses were closed, Tybee beach would be teeming with people enjoying the sand and surf. Jim Ervin and a handful of others braved a strong undertow to ride some unusually strong waves. Otherwise, the beach was nearly deserted and the island was quiet except for the cyclical buzzing of cicadas.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless has beefed up outreach efforts ahead of Hurricane Irma, after Hurricane Matthew left some individuals stranded in high floodwater last year.

 

Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless executive director Cindy Murphy Kelley said Friday that teams had gone out to the area’s homeless camps, distributing fliers with information about the storm and the evacuation, which begins Saturday. She said they planned “to be a bit tougher with folks,” stressing the danger of the storm.

 

NOAA

On this edition of “Political Rewind,” our panel discusses how Georgia braces for Hurricane Irma. Will the state’s new emergency management team be up to the challenge?

Shawn Mullins

We added a couple of tunes to the Georgia Playlist, courtesy of Atlanta singer-songwriter Shawn Mullins. Mullins chose tracks from Gladys Knight & the Pips and the Indigo Girls.

Southcom

Hurricane Irma is howling towards the Southeast. A state of emergency has been declared for 94 Georgia counties. The hurricane is one of the strongest ever recorded in the Atlantic. Joining us to talk about how best to prepare for this mammoth storm is John Knox, Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia.

Georgia Emergency Management Agency

Hurricane Irma made landfall in the United States over the weekend. It is slowly working its way north. Hurricanes are rare in Georgia, but we do get them. Our last direct hit by a major hurricane was in 1898, but that doesn’t mean we haven’t had our share of big storms. Stan Deaton, who is the senior historian of the Georgia Historical Society, recently talked about Georgia's hurricane history on his podcast, Off the Deaton Path.

 

 

Hurricane Irma is howling towards the Southeast. A state of emergency has been declared for 94 Georgia counties. The hurricane is one of the strongest ever recorded in the Atlantic. Joining us to talk about how best to prepare for this mammoth storm is John Knox, Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia.

Ken Burns

America is at a tense moment in history. We're living at a time of stark disagreement. Some say the president doesn't tell the truth; others say he tells it like it is. This tension came to head in Charlottesville, Virginia, where confrontations between white nationalists and counter-protesters erupted in violence. 

Rachel Parker

A flood devastated Rome, Georgia in 1886. According to local lore the waters rose high enough for a steamboat to float down Broad Street, the town’s main thoroughfare. This event inspired city leaders to elevate the street, and all the buildings along it. Business owners recently opened up their basement doors for people to tour the remains of old Rome. We took the tour, and brought back this audio postcard. 

Chatham Emergency Management Agency

Emergency Management officials on the Georgia coast said Wednesday that the area will likely see some effect from Hurricane Irma, though it was too soon to tell how strong the storm would be or whether evacuations would be ordered. Those decisions could come this weekend.

In the meantime, emergency management agencies on the coast were urging residents to monitor the storm and prepare in case it hits.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP Photo

On this edition of “Political Rewind,” our panel discusses the implications of President Trump’s decision to end the DACA program, which offers protections for more than 800,000 young people who were brought to this country by parents who entered illegally. Will Congress pass a measure to continue those protections? What does it mean here in Georgia?

NOAA

 

 

Hotels across the South are booking up, as people leave the coast ahead of Hurricane Irma.

All it takes is a quick look at any of the online booking sites to see. Georgia’s hotel rooms are sold out. Brigette Lee is the director of sales of the Holiday Inn on the north side of Macon, Georgia. She says people leaving the South Carolina barrier islands beat Floridians to the punch by looking for rooms as long ago as last Friday.

The story-in-progress of Run The Jewels is one of triumph. El-P and Killer Mike met in 2011, and after a fruitful collaboration joined forces officially in 2013, forming Run The Jewels. Four years and three critically acclaimed albums later, they have become one of the most unlikely success stories of 21st century hip-hop.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

The Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals--or DACA--program could launch of wave of political pushback.

 

U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the legal protections provided to hundreds of thousands of people who entered the country illegally as children will wind down over the next six months.

 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since the outset of the American presidency, African-Americans have worked in the White House kitchen, but they’re often left out of the history books. We talked with food historian Adrian Miller, author of the book, "The President’s Kitchen Cabinet: The Stories of African-Americans Who Fed Our First Families, From the Washingtons to the Obamas."

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

The Trump administration is asking Congress for an initial $8 billion for recovery efforts after Harvey hit Texas and Louisiana. The storm caused an estimated $180 billion in damage and the economic impact of that will be felt all across the country. In the weeks and months ahead, communities devastated by the storm will need to rebuild.

Hurricane Harvey displaced tens of thousands of people and destroyed tens of thousands of homes across the Southeast. Even though the storm has passed, there’s a long road to recovery. Georgia-based MAP International is one of the relief organizations helping the storm’s victims. We check in with the group’s CEO, Steve Stirling.

MAP International

Hurricane Harvey displaced tens of thousands of people and destroyed tens of thousands of homes across the Southeast. Even though the storm has passed, there’s a long road to recovery. Georgia-based MAP International is one of the relief organizations helping the storm’s victims. We checked in with the group’s CEO, Steve Stirling.

 

John Amis / AP Photo/File

On today’s special edition of "Political Rewind" we talk to former Georgia governor Roy Barnes. In 2001 he led a risky and controversial fight to remove the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag.

Barnes knew he’d have a fight on his hands: business and civic leaders wanted the flag changed and so did  the Georgians who saw the flag as a symbol of the state’s slave past. But there would be fierce resistance from those who were determined to honor the Confederate past. Making the change would require skilled political maneuvering.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Ambassador Andrew Young has worn many hats in his storied life of service to Atlanta.

In the 1970s, he served as a Congressman for Georgia’s 5th District and Ambassador to the United Nations as part of the Carter administration.

For most of the '80s, he was mayor of Atlanta, and in the years since has established the Andrew J. Young Foundation to continue work on economic, educational and human rights issues around the world.

He sat down with Rickey Bevington in the SkyView Ferris Wheel in Downtown Atlanta and shared some of his perspectives on issues past, present and future.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Every day in the United States 91 people die of opioid overdose. That includes prescription opiates and heroin. Over a year, that’s more than ten times the number of people who died on 9/11. On today’s “On Second Thought,” we’re going to hear from some of the people struggling with addiction, those who offer help, and communities caught in the middle.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Getting opioids can be very easy.  Getting rid of them can be very hard. There’s a lot at stake here.  Failure to do dispose of opioids can impacts lives, families, careers­–even the environment.

“These things shouldn’t be treated any differently than a loaded gun that’s sitting around the house,” said Dr. William Jacobs. 

He was a respected anesthesiologist with a successful practice and an idyllic family life but then he succumbed to temptation.

Raymond McCrea Jones

Today on “Two Way Street,” we talk to writer Steve Oney about his new book, “A Man’s World.” Oney has been writing for more than four decades for publications such as Esquire, Time, GQ, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Over the course of his career, he estimates that he’s written somewhere between 150 and 200 profiles, 20 of which are included in this new collection of essays.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office / flickr

Actor Henry Winkler, best known for his leading role on TV's "Happy Days," is coming to Georgia this week for the Decatur Book Festival. He’s the co-creator of a popular children’s book series that centers on Hank Zipzer, a young boy with learning difficulties. We talked with Winkler about his love for writing.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Dr. James Black wants opiate drug seekers to know not to look in his emergency room.

“You know, we're not going to be easy prey, so to speak, for people with repeated usage,” Black said. Black is the director of emergency medicine at the Phobe Putney Medical Center in Albany.

In the context of national trends, Southwest Georgia doesn’t have it as bad as other places. Opiate use is in decline here, but Black said he has seen his fair share of overdoses.

GPB News/Emily Cureton

In South Georgia’s Wiregrass Country, a plaque in the town of Quitman marks a hanging place. It’s where, in August of 1864, four men were executed for plotting a slave rebellion. Over the next century, mob violence against African-Americans often erupted in South Georgia.

This is where our Senior Editor Don Smith was born and raised. He moved away in 1958. Don recently went back to his hometown to mark the anniversary of the Civil War hanging, and talk with longtime residents about how they remember the county’s history of racial violence. GPB's Emily Cureton reports. 

Jessica Gurell / GPB

 

 

The push for medical amnesty all started with a group of parents who lost children to drug overdose.

Robin Elliott was one of them.

 

“My son Zach was a private school student in Buckhead,” she said. “He was a beautiful, bright talented kid and he also used heroin.”

 

 

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