Georgia

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Joshua L. Jones / Athens Banner-Herald

Following the recent events in Charlottesville, a national debate has been raging over what should be done with Confederate symbols across the South. In Athens, and across Georgia, many monuments and markers dedicated to Confederate soldiers persist in daily life.

Richard Drew / AP Photo

The American economy has seen more volatility under the Trump administration than any other recent president. It remains to be seen what kind of long-term effects Trump’s presidency will have on the job market in Georgia, and the global economic landscape. We talk business with Marilyn Geewax, Senior Business Editor and Economics Correspondent for NPR.

Jason Thrasher

Among the legendary music acts to come out of Athens in the ‘70s and '80s was the band Pylon. The group had been a local mainstay until 2009, when guitarist Randall Bewley passed away. But singer Vanessa Briscoe Hay recently revived the band into the newly formed Pylon Reenactment Society. They have a new EP, called “Part Time Punks Session,” coming out this fall.

Georgia House of Representatives

Today on “Political Rewind,” what might happen to Georgia legislators who work to remove Confederate memorials in locations in South Georgia? In an ominous message, Woodbine Rep. Jason Spencer, a white lawmaker, told African-American Rep. LaDawn Jones that “she won’t be met with torches but something a lot more definitive” if she continues to call for the removal of Confederate statues in South Georgia. This, just a day after elected officials and citizens came together to celebrate the display of unity that accompanied the unveiling of the statue of MLK at the Capitol.

AP Photo / John Bazemore

Thursday will be a big day for Georgia Power, millions of its customers all over the state, and the entire U.S. nuclear industry.

 

That’s when the utility will say whether it wants to continue building two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle. It’s the majority owner of the facility, which already has two operating nuclear reactors built back in the 1980s.  

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Imagine a man going from 170 to 255 pounds before your next big trip. Ruby-throated hummingbirds fight for the chance to do just that near the end of every summer. What does that sound like? Listen here to find out. 

Among the legendary music acts to come out of Athens in the ‘70s was the band Pylon. The group had been a local mainstay until 2009, when guitarist Randall Bewley passed away. But singer Vanessa Briscoe Hay recently revived the band into the newly formed Pylon Reenactment Society. They have a new EP, called “Part Time Punks Session,” coming out this fall. We talk with Vanessa Briscoe Hay and drummer Joe Rowe about the new music.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Lisa Kidd knows the drill. She flashes her identification card without needing to be prompted and has her lockbox open, ready to go. This is what she’s up to every fourth Tuesday of the month: picking up her methadone prescription at Counseling Solutions Treatment Center in Chatsworth, Georgia.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Tucked away in northeast Georgia, Stephens County has rolling green hills, about 26,000 people…and a problem.

Job postings have gone unfilled for months as prospective employees haven’t been able to pass drug tests.

But it’s not the usual suspects like cocaine or marijuana putting an economic damper on the northeast Georgia community – it’s illegal use of prescription opioids.

Georgia Man Charged In Charlottesville Beating Arrested

Aug 29, 2017
Monroe County Sheriff's Office

A man charged in connection with the beating of a black man in Charlottesville, Virginia, on the day of a white nationalist rally has been arrested, authorities in Georgia said.

Alex Michael Ramos, 33, turned himself in Monday evening to the Monroe County Sheriff's Office, Sgt. Lawson Bittick told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center

In the Jim Crow South, the laws of the land separated black and white. As racial tensions grew, some police departments added African-American officers to their squads. Atlanta hired eight men in 1948, but their authority was greatly restricted.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

It’s was a slow Thursday morning at Optim Medical Center-Screven in Sylvania, a small town about 60 miles northwest of Savannah.

Only a handful of patients had come into the emergency room in the past few hours.

“Like in any ER, it’s feast or famine: you’re going to have a great day or either you’re going have a very busy day,” said Tina Hood, a physician's assistant who works at the hospital.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Opioids are a $10 billion industry for pharmaceutical companies. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 1999 to 2014, more than 165,000 persons died from overdose related to opioid pain medication in the United States. Today, thousands more are struggling with drug dependency that started with opioids given to them by doctors.

Sam Whitehead / GPB News

Today on “Political Rewind,” 54 years to the day after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, a statue honoring him was unveiled this morning on the grounds of the Georgia Capitol. Our panel of insiders looks at the meaning of this historic event.

Opioids By The Numbers

Aug 28, 2017
Jessica Gurell / GPB

According to the CDC, the amount of opioid painkillers peaked in 2010, but as of 2015, the prescribing rate remained three times as high as in 1999, when the nation’s problem with opioid addiction was just getting started.

Although it has not yet been declared an official emergency by the federal government, the opioid epidemic continues across the country. Georgia is no exception. There are 0.77 prescriptions for every person in Georgia. 

Oliver Noble / Vice

This summer, 27 so-called "micronations" gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Three years ago, Ferguson, Missouri, exploded into national headlines when an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, was shot and killed by the police. Protests erupted in many cities, including Atlanta. Now, Charlottesville is the latest example of the nation’s heightened racial tensions and growing white supremacy groups. We talked with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Wesley Lowery, who covers race and justice for The Washington Post.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

When Donald Trump addressed the tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia, he said there was bad behavior on both sides. Many people then accused the president of false equivalence. That phrase has come up a lot in the past couple years, whether we’re talking about Nazis or Benghazi or emails or Black Lives Matter.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Imagine that you haven't eaten in several days. What would you be thinking about? Most likely, food would be on your mind!

The craving for sustenance that you would feel is actually the brain’s mechanism that drives you to survive

That's how many people describe what its like to be addicted to opiates.

Courtesy of Georgia Building Authority

Today on “Political Rewind,” nearly half a century after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the state of Georgia is unveiling a statue of the civil rights leader at the Capitol on Monday. Ironically, the statue will be dedicated even as the fate of memorials to the Confederacy is once again being debated fiercely here and across the country.

Rebecca Hammel / U.S. Senate Photographic Studio

Is there hope for a diplomatic solution to the rising nuclear threat of North Korea? If you ask Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), diplomacy is the only hope.

 

Speaking on a panel for business leaders and non-governmental organizations in Buckhead today, Perdue agreed emphatically with one of the other speakers, retired Air Force general Richard E. Hawley, that the only viable path to a lasting de-escalation with North Korea is through diplomatic outreach and negotiation.

CC

Rajeev Dhawan, director of the Economic Forecasting Center at Georgia State University, expects moderate job growth for the rest of 2017.

Dhawan issued his forecast for the third quarter on Wednesday, August 23. He says that Georgia’s income and job growth has been affected due to domestic demand driven sectors, such as hospitality, retail and education, not showing much growth.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Dependable sources of labor and a fresh look at international trade topped the wish list of farmers and other stakeholders when they met with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue Friday.

Perdue held a roundtable discussion in Tifton in his role as the head of President Trump’s Task Force on Rural Prosperity. It was the first such roundtable in the South.

“We’re here from the federal government and we’re here not to hurt you,” Perdue joked.

Atlanta's Homeless Face Uncertain Future As Peachtree-Pine Closes

Aug 25, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

On Monday, one of the largest homeless shelters in Georgia will begin the months-long process of shutting its doors.

On its busiest nights, Atlanta’s Peachtree-Pine shelter would house hundreds of men, women, and children. About 300 or so people live there now, and starting next week they’ll be looking to find new places to stay.

Meet The Press / NBC

This past weekend, former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador Andrew Young appeared on NBC’s "Meet The Press" with Chuck Todd. Following the interview, many civil rights activists criticized Young for some of his comments. We get reactions from local leaders, including Reverend Gerald Durley, LGBT activist Monica Helms, and Creative Currents Executive Director Oronike Odeleye.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about Georgia’s Confederate monuments, texting while walking, and our dream retirement plans. Plus, we discuss the benefits of taking a nice cold shower. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Eric Segall, Roxanne Donovan, and Greg Williams.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

On a recent sweltering afternoon, Jeremy stood on a street corner in Atlanta, remembering how his relationship with opioids started.

“I was stealing pain pills from my dad’s prescription jar: Percocet, Lortab, Oxycodone,” he said. “I had to have them before I went to work. I couldn’t work without them.”

 

 

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