Georgia

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Kayne Lanahan founded the Stopover Music Festival seven years ago. She left New York City for Savannah after a successful advertising and marketing career. Since then, she’s become a loud pulse in Georgia’s bustling music scene. We asked her to add to our ongoing series, the Georgia Playlist. She chose works by R.E.M. and Neutral Milk Hotel.

Bonita Johnson suffers with the lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD.

Twice she went to the hospital emergency room because she had trouble breathing, the last time about a year ago. That ER was in Monroe County Hospital in Forsyth.

Savannah Stopover Music Festival

The Savannah Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

We did a live show from The Grey restaurant in Savannah, Georgia for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival.

 

 

The Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Savannah Stopover

It's a busy weekend in Savannah, with the Savannah Stopover music festival and much more. Connect Savannah's Anna Chandler and freelance writer and Do Savannah columnist Joshua Peacock share some highlights.

Anna's picks:

PBS

As college students make spring break plans, many are still buzzing about President Trump’s new executive order that moves the Initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities under the jurisdiction of the White House.

 

 

Trump says the move will help galvanize support for struggling HBCUs. But the details and benefits of the move are still yet to be seen.

 

 

Georgia Citizens Panel

Mar 8, 2017

Today on “Political Rewind,” we put some listeners in the hot seat. Our Citizens Panel (including one green card resident from Germany), joined us at GPB studios to tell us about their reactions to the first few weeks of the Donald Trump presidency.

WIKIPEDIA COMMONS / Creative Commons

Attorneys on both sides of a high-profile case of what was alleged to be voter fraud in Georgia say they have agreed those charges were unfounded.

In the lead up to a contentious local election in 2015, sheriff’s deputies in Hancock County ­– 100 miles east of Atlanta – knocked on doors checking to see if voters were living where their drivers’ licenses said they did. The board of elections identified 180 voters, mostly African-American, who were mismatched and accused them of voter fraud.

After out-of-court mediation, an agreement issued this week refutes that. 

Atlanta Hawks Awarded For Diversity Efforts

Mar 8, 2017
@CavsSirCC on Twitter / NBA.com

On March 2, the Atlanta Hawks Basketball Club was awarded the Best Diversity Campaign or Initiative Award at the 3rd Annual Cynopsis Social Good Awards in New York. The award is given to a network, brand, agency or corporation that is committed to racial, ethnic, religious, and gender diversity.

Weekend Events Put New Express Lanes To The Test

Mar 8, 2017
formulanone / Flickr

Traffic can’t be avoided in Atlanta. But the newly constructed express lanes on I-75 aim to provide a smoother commute for the South Metro area.

"The general purpose lanes have improved congestion and the residents are happy to have a new choice for their commute," said Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation. 

Georgia singer Jamie Barton is a rising star in the opera world. She’s only 35 but her voice has filled concert halls all over the world. In 2015, she nabbed the prestigious Richard Tucker Award. It’s a $50,000 prize sometimes called the "Heisman Trophy" of Music. But Barton hails from a place not often associated with grand opera--Rome, Georgia. We revisit a conversation with Jamie about finding a passion for opera in an unusual setting.

speaker.gov

As lawmakers continue to pour over the Republican plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, members of Georgia’s congressional delegation have started to respond.

Emory Law Journal Elects First Black Editor-In-Chief

Mar 7, 2017
Emory Law School

Since its inception in 1952, the Emory Law Journal has never elected a black editor-in-chief — until now.

The college announced Wednesday that Emory University School of Law student Janiel Myers was named to the Journal's highest role.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports () Myers was born in Jamaica and recently naturalized as an American citizen. Myers says she hopes her appointment will help impact the future of diversity at the law school.

Police in southeast Georgia are investigating after two soldiers were found dead in an apartment outside Fort Stewart.

Hinesville police Capt. James C. Reid said Tuesday that an anonymous tip made to a police department in another city led officers to the bodies late Sunday. Reid called the deaths suspicious, saying there were injuries to the bodies, but declined to give further details about the deaths. He said autopsies were scheduled to be performed Tuesday.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

Atlanta United Addressing Anti-Gay Chant At First Match

Mar 7, 2017
Atlanta United

Atlanta United said Monday it is "taking measures internally" to address an anti-gay chant used by some fans attending the team's first Major League Soccer match.

United spokesman Winkler said the team was aware of the chant during Sunday night's 2-1 loss to the New York Red Bulls. In a statement to The Associated Press, the team said the chants "have no place in our matches" and fans participating in those chants will be removed from games.

Joe Rogers Sr. and Tom Forkner opened their first Waffle House in Avondale Estates, Ga., on Labor Day in 1955.

Rogers died on Friday at the age of 97. Forkner is 99 years old.

When the two met, Rogers worked for the Toddle House restaurant chain and Forkner worked in real estate.

Forkner was the businessman in the partnership that produced the all-night diner chain, and Rogers was the people person — a champion for customers and employees.

The yellow Waffle House sign has become a familiar landmark along roadways in the Southeast.

Photo courtesy of Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim is bringing back “Samurai Jack,” one of Cartoon Network’s most beloved animated shows. It ran for four seasons from 2001 to 2004, but the storyline never concluded. Samurai Jack has since become a cult classic in the animation world. And after much demand, the creators have revived it for Season Five.

We’re joined by Genndy Tartakovsky, the original creator; and Scott Wills, Art Director for the series.

Luis M. Alvarez / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” another weekend, another POTUS tweetstorm. As Trump accuses Obama of wiretapping him in the waning days of the 2016 campaign, partisan battles get even uglier. Where did this story originate and is there any proof these claims could be accurate? Our panel has much to say.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In recent years, many newspapers and magazines have abandoned their print publications for an all digital format. From the Christian Science Monitor, to Newsweek, to Jet Magazine. One Decatur-based magazine is moving from digital back to print.

Elaine Read and Matt Weyandt

All this year, in our series Georgia Eats, we explore the South’s relationship with food. We’ve talked about the state’s craft beer industry. Turns out there’s also a craft chocolate movement, and it’s taken some Georgia chocolatiers far beyond the state’s borders.

Man Accused Of Threats To Rep. Lewis' Staff Denied Bond

Mar 6, 2017

A judge says an Atlanta man accused of threatening the staff of U.S. Rep. John Lewis must undergo a mental health evaluation before the judge will consider releasing him from custody.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Baverman denied bail Monday for 42-year-old Dante Antoine Rosser. He scheduled another hearing for March 23.

Court records say the Democratic congressman's Atlanta-based staff members expressed "grave concerns" for their safety after Rosser visited their office and also made repeated phone calls.

Eric Norris / flickr

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month to tighten regulation of methadone clinics. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia has more than 70 clinics, the most in the South. We talked about this with Neil Campbell, who oversees the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse.

Future has made history: the Atlanta rapper's two albums, released back-to-back over two weeks, have each officially landed at the peak of the Billboard 200 albums chart. With the respective releases of FUTURE on Feb. 17 and HNDRXX on Feb. 24, Future is the first solo act in the 61-year history of the album chart to supplant himself at No. 1 with two successive releases, according to Billboard:

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month that would tighten methadone clinic regulations. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia leads the South in terms of methadone clinics; we have 71 in comparison to Tennessee's 14 and South Carolina's 20. So why do we outnumber our neighbors when it comes to methadone clinics? Neil Campbell, executive director of the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse, will weigh in on this phenomenon with help from Catoosa County Sheriff, Gary Sisk.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Several hundred people lined up along rooftops, parking decks and surface streets to watch this morning's controlled implosion of the Georgia Archives Building.

Built in 1965, the "White Ice Cube" across from the Capitol has been empty since 2003 after engineers determined the building was sinking.

On today’s “Two Way Street” we talk with Rodger Lyle Brown, the author of “Party Out of Bounds: The B-52s, R.E.M. and the Kids Who Rocked Athens, Georgia.” It’s the story of how Athens became the center of the rock and roll universe starting around 1980 and continuing for almost 20 years.

Georgia House Backs Bill Allowing Guns On College Campuses

Mar 3, 2017
HECTOR ALEJANDRO / Flickr/CC

Despite Gov. Nathan Deal's forceful veto last year, Georgia's House approved another bill on Friday that would allow licensed gun owners to carry concealed handguns on public college campuses.

By a vote of 108-63, the Republican House majority sent the bill to the state Senate, which could set up another politically unpopular rejection by the Republican governor.

Changes to 9 House Districts Pass After Democrats Protest

Mar 3, 2017

Republicans approved changes to nine Georgia House districts as Democrats accused the majority party of trying to protect its own.

The bill was approved on party lines, 108 to 59, and heads to the state Senate.

Friday marks a key deadline. Bills must pass at least one chamber by the end of the day to stay alive for the year.

House Speaker David Ralston defended the changes, saying "they hurt no member" of the House.

Ken Lund / Flickr

Today on "Political Rewind," it’s Crossover Day at the Capitol, if a bill doesn't make it out of the House or the Senate by the end of the day, it's dead for this session. We spoke with Lisa Rayam from GPB’s "Lawmakers," and Greg Bluestein of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution for updates on bills that have made the cut and others that probably won’t.

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