Georgia

Ways to Connect

Reno Tahoe / Flick

Legislation that would have allowed casino gambling in Georgia is dead for the year.

 

Sen. Brandon Beach (R - Alpharetta) said he pulled the measure because he didn’t have enough votes to get the bill out of the Senate Regulated Industries Committee.

 

“Big issues like this take time. And so, we're just gonna have to come back next year,” Beach told reporters Monday. 

 

Bill McChesny / Flickr/CC

There are just four legislative days left until Crossover Day 2017. Any bill that hasn’t made it through at least one chamber of the Georgia General Assembly by Friday will be dead for the year.

But, with the clock ticking, there are still a number of major education issues that haven’t crossed over.

Polybert49 / Foter

The label narcissist gets thrown around a lot, but it’s not usually used correctly. People often think "narcissistic" is a synonym for "arrogant," and that’s not true. Because narcissist is a word that many people use but often don’t understand, we break it down for you.

wallyg / Foter

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

KICKSTARTER

On this day in 1971, Rozonda ‘Chilli’ Thomas was born in Atlanta. She would grow up to become one-third of the group TLC. The trio is famous for a number of memorable hits, including the song, "Creep," which won a Grammy in 1996.

 

 

Outside of her music career, Thomas has worked as an actor, a reality TV star, and a fitness guru. She also founded the organization Chilli’s Crew, a group that helps young girls deal with self-esteem issues.

Sam Whitehead / GPB

This year could be a big one for school choice. State lawmakers are considering expanding a program that gives tax credits to Georgians who help bankroll private school scholarships. 

 

Supporters say the program gives students in public schools better access to other education options. But for many Georgians, especially those living in rural communities, those options are hard to find.

 

AP Photo

This years marks the 150th anniversary of the oldest Jewish congregation in Atlanta – the Temple, which was founded in 1867. The congregation was made up largely of well-to-do Atlantans – businessmen and their families who were well respected by many in the much larger Christian community.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we’re broadcasting from the State Bar for the second year in a row with a live audience here for the discussion.

Fannin County Sheriff's Office

On Wednesday, a 27-year-old North Georgia man was charged with possession of the deadly toxin, ricin. Fannin County officials arrested William Christopher Gibbs in early February after he drove himself to a hospital and said that he had been exposed to ricin. An indictment filed Wednesday says Gibbs had ricin without registration required by law.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with a week’s worth of crazy news to discuss. We’ll talk about why Democrats are meeting in Atlanta to elect a leader, and what it was about Milo Yiannopoulos’ recent controversy that tipped conservatives over the edge. Plus, we’ll look at research which show dogs have their own sense of morality, and another study which finds people who move around a lot lose out on friendships.

Our group this week includes:

Georgia National Guard / Foter

The Georgia Senate is one of  26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings.

The Georgia Senate is one of 26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings. Some senators are going rogue--using mobile phones or small cameras to stream committee meetings. Those actions have called for new rules, leading to a mess of tension and controversy. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Kristina Torres breaks down the debate.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In January, Atlanta lost a beloved Atlanta restaurateur: Richard Thomas died at 82. He will be remembered for his R. Thomas Deluxe Grill, which he founded in 1985 as a homage to healthy living. Thomas co-founded the North Carolina fast food chain Bojangles. He also served as the first president of operations at Kentucky Fried Chicken.

Our understanding of history is often shaped by a lot of things other than what we learned in school. Historian Gary Gallagher is particularly fascinated by how narratives about the Civil War develop following their portrayals in movies. Gallagher is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. We revisit a conversation with him about films that shape perceptions of history.

Senate Passes Stringent Opioid Treatment Program Regulations

Feb 23, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Georgia has become the opioid treatment program capital of the South as loose regulations have led to an explosion of new clinics opening around the state.

But Senators are working to tamp down the booming business with a licensure program that will require new clinics to demonstrate a need in the community before being allowed to open.

“We wanna make sure we have quality treatment facilities in all of Georgia and help run off the riffraff,” said Sen. Jeff Mullis, R- Chickamauga, sponsor of the legislation.

Seaside Sisters

There's plenty to do in the Savannah area this weekend if you're looking for a little fun. Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar and Heather Henley of Do Savannah have some suggestions.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Keitra Bates is standing in front of an empty storefront on Atlanta's Westside. The walls are yellow-painted stucco over cinder blocks, with iron bars on the windows and doors, and a small side yard littered with abandoned tires. A corner store, the Fair Street Superette, is next door.

Rick Bowmer / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” President Trump and the topic of tone. A month into his administration, is Trump starting to realize that what he says may not be as important as how he says it? Take his statements on the vandalism at a Jewish cemetery and bomb threats at Jewish Community Centers across the country: when he’s off the cuff, he’s still a little rough but pulls it together when his remarks are prepared. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer laments, “It’s never good enough.”

Bobcat Kittens Could Signal Comeback On Jekyll Island

Feb 22, 2017
Jekyll Island Authority

Two bobcat kittens spotted recently on Jekyll Island could be an early sign the elusive predators are making a comeback on the coastal state park after vanishing roughly a century ago.

Conservation Manager Ben Carswell of the Jekyll Island Authority said Wednesday that motion-activated cameras used to monitor wildlife captured images in late December of a bobcat mother and one kitten. More images taken soon after confirmed two young bobcats.

We dedicate our entire show to the way Southerners speak.

Where did y’all come from? We can trace the use of the word “y’all” all the way back to our colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson.

Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why “America Needs Y’all.”

Commuity Protests KKK Sign In Dahlonega

Feb 22, 2017
Aungelique Proctor / Fox 5 Atlanta

A sign claiming that the Butler Building in Dahlonega, Georgia is a “Historic Ku Klux Klan Meeting Hall” has the community in an uproar. Klan and Confederate flags were also placed on the building. Hundreds gathered on Feb. 16 to protest the sign that mysteriously appeared on the building owned by local businesswoman Roberta Green-Garrett.

Debate Over Religious Freedom Returns To Georgia Legislature

Feb 22, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Georgia Republicans have again proposed legislation they argue will protect people acting on religious belief, undaunted by the forceful veto of a similar proposal last year by the state's Republican governor.

The bill filed Tuesday revived heated opposition from the state's business community and advocates who fear it will excuse discrimination against LGBT people.

Criminal Justice Council Recommends Changes To Probation

Feb 22, 2017
Bubba73 / Wikimedia Commons

State officials are recommending changes to help reduce what they say is the highest rate of felons on probation in the country.

In a report submitted to Gov. Nathan Deal on Tuesday, the Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform said doing so would have several positive results, including reducing heavy caseloads for probation officers and allowing the officers to focus more on higher-risk offenders.

PINTEREST

February is a time to celebrate influential figures in African-American history. And our guest today is certainly one of those trailblazing figures.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Hundreds of people packed into a town hall meeting with Republican Representative Buddy Carter in Savannah Tuesday. Carter was the latest of several GOP Congress members to find emotions running high back home.

Before taking questions, Carter laid out some of his goals for the new Congress, including repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.

Gustavo Tejal / Flickr/CC

A group of Georgia senators are working on a package of bills designed to support law enforcement.

The Senate Public Safety Committee voted unanimously Tuesday to pass each of the four bills. The proposals now move to the Senate Rules Committee.

The Rocketeer / Foter

The Georgia Peach might well be the most iconic fruit to symbolize Georgia. You see it on license plates, billboards, and even government documents. But the peach is actually rare to Georgia, and not native to our agricultural climate.

Tom Okie is an Assistant Professor of History Education at Kennesaw State University. His new book, called “The Georgia Peach: Culture, Agriculture, and Environment in the American South,” explores the odd history of the fruit.

When you think of a fictional "hero," you might picture a strong, capable character. Someone who exudes confidence and is revered by those around them. But the heroes of Yiddish literature are very different.

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We learned more about the fight to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS with Tiffany Roan, the state’s regional director for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

Pages