Georgia

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David Goldman / AP Photo/File

School officials say there will be no more Civil War-related student dress-up activities at a Georgia elementary school after its "Civil War Day" sparked conflict among students, parents and others.

Big Shanty Elementary School last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the war.

The mother of a 10-year-old black child says a white student dressed as a plantation owner approached him and said, "You are my slave."

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The show got a reboot on Netflix this summer. We talk with series creator Joel Hodgson.

Ryan McFadin

The Breakroom returns to discuss Woody Allen’s comments on the “Me Too” campaign, and check out some upcoming Star Wars and Marvel films. We also talk about Georgia’s commitment to high speed rail, why boxing is less popular than it was, and if the infamous jewel thief Doris Payne is actually calling it quits. Joining us this week are Donnie Leapheart, Steve Brown, Kalena Boller, and Natalie Pawelski.

Atlanta Activists Respond To #MeToo

Oct 20, 2017

Over the last week, stories about sexual assault and harassment have flooded social media with the “Me Too” hashtag. It’s meant to raise awareness about these abuses in the wake of allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein.

Canine Cellmates

 

 

Over the summer, bikers, walkers and runners were treated to some art as they enjoyed Atlanta’s Beltine.  

Included in the display was a group of photos of black men incarcerated at the Fulton County jail.

The four photos feature men in their prison jumpsuits posing with dogs that they trained as part of the Canine Cellmates program.

"On Second Thought" is celebrating its third anniversary this week. The show launched its first broadcast on GPB on October 20, 2014. To celebrate three amazing years, we’re re-airing our best segments in a two part broadcast. Here are the best picks for today:

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

This week "On Second Thought" celebrates three years on the air. The show launched October 20, 2014. To celebrate, we’re re-airing a few of our best segments. Do you have a favorite segment or episode? Let us know.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young Sulu in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei earlier this year when the play “Allegiance,” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

kennesaw.edu

On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

David Goldman / AP Photo

A powerful lawmaker texted a Georgia sheriff, boasting how they pressured a university president to take action after black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained the text messages under Georgia's open records act.

Kennesaw State University cheerleaders were told they'd be kept off field during pregame activities after five knelt to protest racial injustice at a game Sept. 30.

Relatives: Zell Miller No Longer Making Public Appearances

Oct 18, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Relatives of Zell Miller say he will no longer make public appearances as he deals with health challenges.

The 85-year-old former Georgia governor and U.S. senator took a fall at a Young Harris College basketball game in February 2016.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that tests at a hospital later found proteins associated with Parkinson's with Lewy bodies — a form of the disease associated with dementia.

His grandson Bryan Miller said he is experiencing "the cognitive symptoms that are associated with this type of Parkinson's."

Guilty Plea But No Jail For Jewel Thief Doris Payne, 87

Oct 18, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

A notorious jewel thief recently arrested at a Georgia Walmart store got no jail time during her latest court appearance.

Doris Payne, at 87, has stolen about $2 million in jewels over the last six decades. She was arrested July 17 for a misdemeanor shoplifting charge after a Walmart employee said she tried to leave the suburban Atlanta store with items she hadn't paid for.

Emily Jones / GPB News

As debate flares over Confederate monuments around the country, one church in coastal South Carolina is building a memorial to Harriet Tubman. A model was unveiled Tuesday.

We add two more songs to our Georgia Playlist. Philip Frobos is the bassist and vocalist for the Atlanta band OMNI. They released their second album, “Multi-Task,” last month. Frobos brings us tunes by Love Tractor and Current Rage.

David Goldman / AP Photo

In Georgia, sports are a way of life. The fandom surrounding sports often influences the psyche of both the individual and the groups obsessing over teams. Erin Tarver explores how sports can influence our values in her new book, “The ‘I’ in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.” She talks to us, along with Vicki Michaelis, Professor of Sports Journalism at the University of Georgia.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

The annual Pride Parade drew thousands of people to Midtown Atlanta over the weekend. GPB’s Emily Cureton stopped by Piedmont Park to ask a few parade-goers what Pride events mean to them.

Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

The student who wears the owl mascot costume at a Georgia public university where five cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem had no business leading a cross-campus march in support of the cheerleaders, an influential lawmaker said.

Kenneth Sturkey, who dresses as Scrappy the Owl at Kennesaw State University athletic events, said he donned the costume without permission for Monday's rally on behalf of cheerleaders who knelt at a game Sept. 30 to protest racial inequality.

“Dear Martin,” a new novel by Atlanta author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color, through the eyes of a teenage boy. 

"I really wrote it for my sons, they’re one and five…  And eventually, in 10 years, there are still going to be people who look at my sons and see a threat, instead of a kid. And I want them to be able to navigate this world that we live in,” says Stone. 

A new novel by Atlanta-based author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color through the eyes of a teenage boy. He tries to make sense of contemporary racism using the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr., asking if those teachings still hold up. “Dear Martin” is out today, Oct. 17. The book launches with an event tonight at The National Center for Human and Civil Rights in Atlanta. Author Nic Stone joins us live in the studio.

Sean Powers / University of Missouri

The annual AfroPunk music festival returned to Atlanta, attracting thousands of concertgoers. The celebration of innovation in the music and fashion world began in 2005 in Brooklyn, and has morphed into an international celebration in other major cities, like London and Paris. Producers Jeff Harris and Sean Powers documented the festival.

  

  

  

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On today's "Political Rewind," we take a closer look at just what President Trump’s executive orders on health care really mean for assuring quality insurance coverage. Who are the winners and losers in the deal? How will it affect Georgians? Andy Miller of "Georgia Health News" helps illuminate the issues.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

As Hispanic populations grow in the South, already problematic color lines there are shifting. It’s particularly evident in South Georgia. Sean Powers reports on a violent and tragic incident in Tifton, Georgia that slowed progress in bringing people of color closer.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Delta Airlines CEO Edward Bastain is bristling at a few Trump administration policies that he says will hurt the company. It’s the first time the company has expressed deep concern with the president. Our panel talks about the friction.

Then: negotiations on a new NAFTA agreement break down, Georgia farmers could pay a steep price for failure to strike a deal. How much will tariffs hurt agriculture exports, especially in the North Georgia poultry industry?

Father Spoon / Flickr/CC

Fans at the first big concert at Atlanta's gleaming new sports arena say a screeching sound made it impossible to hear country music star Garth Brooks' lyrics — even though they knew all the words to his songs.

Some fans left Thursday night's show early, WSB-TV reported . Others are asking for refunds.

Stadium officials are looking into sound quality in sections of the upper concourse, Mercedes-Benz Stadium said in a statement late Thursday. A breaker that powered speakers was tripped for "a small amount of time," it said.

Columbus Ends Fees For People Who Drop Abuse Allegations

Oct 13, 2017
Peter / Flickr/CC

The city of Columbus, Georgia has agreed to stop making alleged victims in domestic violence cases pay fees when they decline to participate in prosecutions.

The city also agreed to repay $41,844 in fees and damages for the 101 people it charged when they decided not to press charges against their alleged abusers.

Federal Judge Clay Land approved these terms in a class action settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Center for Human Rights in October 2016 against the city of Columbus, a local judge and several law enforcement officers.

Atlanta Land Deal Angers People Who Want Affordable Housing

Oct 13, 2017
Anish Patel / Flickr/CC

A controversial deal to require Atlanta's low-income housing authority to sell prime parcels of vacant land to a developer would hand them over at a $120 million discount, according to estimates obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

If the sale goes through, it could amount to a king-sized subsidy towards the construction of high-end, market-rate homes, and harm the city's efforts to create more affordable housing, public housing officials and affordable housing advocates said.

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

Musical acts from all over the world come to Atlanta this weekend for the Afropunk Music Festival. One group performing is Georgia’s own, Algiers. Their latest album is called “The Underside of Power.” GPB’s Sean Powers catches up with lead singer, Franklin James Fisher.

NBC

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Democratic strategist Howard Franklin, Editorial Page Editor Charles Richardson of the Telegraph in Macon, Amy Condon of the Refinery Writing Studio, and writer Jessica Szilagyi of AllOnGeorgia.com.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Musical acts from all over the world come to Atlanta this weekend for the Afropunk music festival. One group performing is Georgia’s own Algiers. Their latest album is called “The Underside of Power.” We talked with lead singer, Franklin James Fisher.

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