Georgia

Ways to Connect

Flickr / Right to the City Alliance

Atlanta’s demographics are in flux, and city neighborhoods are following suit. A new study from Georgia State University took a comprehensive look at the last 45 years in the Atlanta metro area. It found the city is more diverse, more educated and wealthier than ever. That sounds like good news. The bad news is, the city has lost five percent of its affordable housing units every single year since 2012.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

Authorities Say Escaped Georgia Inmates Caught In Tennessee

Jun 15, 2017
GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS / AP Photo

Two escaped inmates sought in the killings of two guards on a prison bus in Georgia were captured Thursday in Tennessee, authorities said.

GPB

For generations, black women have gathered together to share insights, wisdom, and to encourage one another.

 

Now, Georgia Public Broadcasting wants to bring those candid conversations to TV with a new talk show called "A Seat at the Table."

Reward To $130,000 In Growing Search For Fugitive Inmates

Jun 15, 2017
GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS / AP Photo

The FBI is expanding the search for two inmates sought in the killing of their guards on a prison bus in Georgia, and a sheriff said Thursday the fugitives could be halfway across the country by now.

With a Twist on Facebook

Wondering what to do in Savannah this Father's Day weekend? Tanya Milton of the Savannah Tribune has you covered.

-Celebrate Juneteenth with the Daughters of Mary Magdalene's annual festival, held at 38th street park. The holiday celebrates the day - June 19, 1865 - when slaves in Texas first learned they were free. The festival features music and fun, as well as honoring locals who've helped the community. Saturday, 11 a.m.; free.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” a shocking event this morning on a baseball field near Washington D.C. brings out the worst in partisan politics. Five people were injured in an attack that reportedly began by the shooter asking if the men on the field were Republicans or Democrats.

Physics Tutor / flickr

More than six decades ago, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling. For the first time in history, it was illegal for states to have separate public schools for black and white students. However, many public schools in the South have actually re-segregated in the years since Brown v. Board, according to a recent report from Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Most clowns are cheerful, right? Well, one clown in Atlanta is awfully sad. Puddles the Clown is a persona created by Atlanta-based singer and bandleader Mike Geier. Puddles is currently a contestant on FOX’s "America’s Got Talent." He won over all the judges. We asked Geir to tell us how he met Puddles, and to take a step away from his friend by adding his picks to our Georgia Playlist. 

wallyg / Foter

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center.

Authorities in Putnam County, Ga., say a manhunt is underway for two inmates who are described as "dangerous beyond description."

Donnie Russell Rowe has been serving a life sentence without parole since 2002, and Ricky Dubose began serving a 20-year sentence in 2015.

They were serving sentences at Hancock State Prison for armed robbery and other crimes.

The two were on a prison bus early Tuesday morning on the way to a different facility when they got through a gate on the bus and overpowered and disarmed two guards.

Courtesy of Mary Dearborn

Honored among America’s most famous novelists, Ernest Hemingway told a lot of stories. And his celebrity life generated some too. Mary Dearborn is the author of a new biography, and it is the first Hemingway biography penned by a woman. She’s in Atlanta on Tuesday, June 13, for a book signing at the Margaret Mitchell House.

This month marks two years since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a ban on gay marriage. The LGBT Institute at Atlanta's Center For Civil and Human Rights tells the stories of the gay rights movement. We hear from Executive Director Ryan Roemerman and board member Tim’m West.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” another day of "Must-Watch TV" on tap for tomorrow as Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify in an open hearing. What will he say and will he invoke executive privilege?

On this episode, we discussed how thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute; and Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, joined us for that conversation.

 

LAWRENCE JACKSON / AP Photo

President Trump announced in a tweet he has tapped Atlanta Attorney Chris Wray to be the new FBI Director. Wray was the assistant attorney general leading the Justice Department's criminal division, from 2003 to 2005. The news came just a day before former FBI Director James Comey was scheduled to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

fatseth / Foter

Thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. We talk with Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute. Also Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution joins us.

Vast Georgia Wildfire Almost Out After Days Of Soaking Rain

Jun 12, 2017
USFWS Fire SE

A wildfire that burned vast acreage and at one point threatened hundreds of homes near the Georgia-Florida state line has been nearly extinguished after steady rains soaked the Okefenokee Swamp over the past week.

Georgia Department of Law Enforcement

A manhunt is under way for two inmates accused of killing two guards on a Georgia prison bus Tuesday morning.

Under Trump, US Militias Not Ready To Lay Down Arms

Jun 12, 2017
Lisa Marie Pane / AP Photo

In the woods south of Atlanta, near Jackson, Georgia, John and Yvette DeMaria are with about a dozen camouflage-wearing, heavily armed Americans huffing and puffing as they scramble to navigate the sprawling piece of property where they train, one weekend a month, to ward off enemies — foreign or domestic.

Lauren Gerson / FLICKr/CC

Former President Jimmy Carter took time to shake the hand of every passenger aboard a recent commercial flight from Atlanta to Washington.

James Parker Sheffield was aboard the flight last week and tweeted video of the smiling 92-year-old walking down the aisle and shaking hands with everyone aboard. Sheffield tells Atlanta's WSB-TV that Carter's enthusiasm was "authentic and humble."

Talia Crews / flickr

Lead was banned from plumbing decades ago, but as the crisis in Flint, Michigan shows, lead contamination lasts a long time. A new investigation into Georgia’s water systems finds they are not immune from lead contamination. We talked about the story with reporters Andy Miller of Georgia Health News and Brenda Goodman of WebMD.

We have a big anniversary coming up here on “Two Way Street.” On July 5, we’ll celebrate three years on the air. In that time we’ve talked with well over 100 guests – authors, performers, chefs, scientists, historians and others who have good stories to tell; because that’s what TWS is all about: storytelling.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we have another busy lineup with the 6th District election looming and another debate to break down! Jon Ossoff is making news for the amount of fundraising he's done. Plus, we dive into the latest polling numbers.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

The numbers are in after four months of a six month experiment in promoting coyote hunting in Georgia. The results are mixed.

 

Trappers have turned in 176 coyotes to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources since March in what DNR is calling the Coyote Challenge. Jennifer Wisniewski, communications manager for the DNR Wildlife Resources Division, says that may sound like a lot until you consider what deer hunters do every fall.

 

The Southern dialect is a complex thing, especially when pouring out the mouths of three of the regions best rappers ever. From the marble-mouthed flow of trapper du jour Gucci Mane, to the elongated vowel sounds of the dearly departed Pimp C, to the sticky, multi-syllabic delivery of OutKast's most consistent player Big Boi, it comes in all drawls and colors.

The Breakroom gang is back to discuss the potential for Georgia to have its first African-American female governor, a debate over espionage vs. whistleblowing, and examining the feminism of Wonder Woman. Then we talk about Cumberland Island, why men refuse to seek medical help, and our favorite BBQ sauces. Our guests are Kalena Boller, Kathy Lohr, Stefan Turkheimer, and Jessica Szilagyi. 

TheClubTI / flickr

We talked with comedian Caroline Rhea, best known for her role on the ABC television show, "Sabrina the Teenage Witch." Rhea is performing June 9 and 10 at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Here in the South, we know our food is delicious, and even the region's young chefs are celebrated. Jasmine Stewart, 12, of Milton, Georgia took first place in FOX’s latest MasterChef Junior competition. We joined Jasmine and her proud family in their kitchen.

 

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Last Saturday in the 6th District, with just a few weeks to go before election day, a modest crowd gathered at a soccer field in Sandy Springs.

 

People lounged on blankets in the blistering sun sipping iced coffee, fanned themselves in the shade along the field’s edges, paid half-attention to the band playing jangly music up on stage.

 

“Thank you all for being here to rock your Ossoff!” the band’s leader called out to close their set.

 

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