Georgia

Ways to Connect

Touchstone/Simon & Schuster; FDR Archives

This week marks the 72nd anniversary of the death and subsequent funeral of President Franklin Roosevelt. He died on April 12, 1945 at the Little White House in Warms Spring, Georgia; the funeral took place on April 15 in Washington D.C.

Jon Ossoff Twitter

Today on “Political Rewind,”  Tick. Tock. Just one more weekend of 6th District attack ads to weather. Unless there's a runoff, then you get to hear them until June 20! Our panel is recapping the latest polling, the latest attack ads, and the latest drama around a race that's drawing national attention. There's a lot to talk about!

Photo Courtesy of Jon Ossoff

A Republican super PAC is paying for attack ads against a Democratic candidate in the Sixth District race. One ad claims Jon Ossoff’s ties to media outlet Al Jazeera link him to terrorism and anti-Western ideologies. We talk about the ethics of campaign ads with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University.

Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, filmmaker and podcast producer Kalena Boller, Sam Burnham of the blog “All the Biscuits in Georgia,” and Democratic Strategist Howard Franklin.

 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

The race to fill Tom Price’s congressional seat has attracted A LOT of candidates. Democrats hope all the attention will help flip the Sixth District from red to blue after a special election next Tuesday, April 18. We talk about the significance of the election’s outcome with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Atlanta Braves are saying there’s more to their new stadium than hot dogs and beer.

The team hopes a 50-acre development surrounding SunTrust Park will keep fans engaged and keep them coming back year-round.

Alex Sanz / AP Photo

One of the biggest questions metro Atlantans have had about the opening of SunTrust Park is traffic.

The new 42,000 seat stadium sits at the intersection of two major interstates – I-285 and I-75.

But local officials say they’re prepared.

Rickey Bevington

When the Atlanta Braves announced their move to the suburbs in 2013, some skeptics foresaw an exodus of residents fleeing game day traffic and crowds.

Four years later, Cobb County home sales are outpacing other metro counties.  

Authorities say at least four people have been shot at an Atlanta public transit station.

Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority spokesman Erik Burton says in a statement that the shooting happened about 4:30 p.m. Thursday at the West Lake station, which has been temporarily closed.

There was no immediate word of the victims' conditions.

Burton says police have detained a suspect but further details were not immediately released.

He says MARTA has set up a bus between stations to accommodate customers during the closure.

Savannah Earth Day Festival on Facebook

Spring has sprung in Savannah, and there are plenty of ways to celebrate this weekend. Tanya Milton of the Savannah Tribune and Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar share some ways to have fun.

Marianne's picks:

Richard Watkins

This week, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution was honored as a Pulitzer Prize finalist for its investigation of thousands of doctors across the country. Reporters discovered that a disturbing number of medical professionals are sexually abusing their patients with little or no repercussions.

DoDEA Communications / Foter

As the population of Latino students increases, the number of Latino teachers in the workforce is still scarce. Gainesville and Hall County are struggling to find teachers who reflect the student population. We talk about this with Julio Cabanas, an Assistant Principal at Fair Street Elementary in Gainesville. Cabanas is also Gainesville’s first Hispanic school administrator.

The Library of Congress

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the United States' involvement in World War I. More than a 100,000 men and women from Georgia served in the conflict. One of them was Roland Neel of Macon. Lieutenant Neel received the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action. He shared his memories in a 1975 interview with the Macon Telegraph.

 

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into World War I. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war. Since 1921, the artificial flower has been used to honor those who died, and it rose to prominence thanks to a former University of Georgia professor Moina Michael. She’s featured in the Atlanta History Center’s exhibit. We talk with Sue VerHoef, the center’s director of Oral History and Genealogy.

Amazon.com

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into WWI. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Over a quarter of the schools on the Georgia’s Priority Schools List are moving on.

 

In total, 74 out of the 243 schools on the list have worked their way off the list. Most of those schools are in the Atlanta metro area, especially in the Atlanta Public School system and the Dekalb County School System.

Jon Ossoff campaign

Today on “Political Rewind,” how does a loss in Kansas still seem like good news for Democrats?

Fulton County Jail

Five attorneys have informed the court that they will be representing the homeless man that was charged with setting a fire that led to the collapse of a portion of I-85 in Atlanta.

Basil Eleby was indicted April 7 on charges of arson and criminal damage to property in the first degree. Eleby is being represented by Lawrence Zimmerman, Gerald Griggs, Mawuli Davis, Gary Spencer, and Tiffany Roberts for no charge. All of the attorneys have experience with high-profile cases.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Do you love the kitchen? Do you love it enough earn your living there?

High School students at in the culinary arts track at the Hutchings College and Career Academy in Macon get to answer both of those questions at the school’s Compass Rose Cafe.

 

©Nina Subin

Dominican-American novelist Junot Diaz published “The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” a decade ago. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007. When he’s not writing, he teaches college students--he formerly taught Freedom University here in Georgia, which offers post-secondary education to undocumented immigrants.

We speak with Junot Diaz ahead of a lecture at Emory University at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 12th.

Wikimedia Commons

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner.

Kevin Christopher Burke / Foter

A fraternity at the University of Georgia was recently suspended for a year for misconduct during a hazing ceremony. A ban on new bars opening in Downtown Athens took effect in February. All this points to a problem with partying.

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner. He joins us with Sue Sturgis of the online energy magazine, Facing South.

A special election is coming up in a week to fill Tom Price’s vacated seat in Georgia’s 6th Congressional district. The race is both contentious and expensive, by-products of the modern democratic process. We talked about our democracy and its health.

Centuries ago, Plato predicted that democracy is always doomed to fail. Was he right? We asked two political science experts: Robert Pirro of Georgia Southern University and Michael Evans of Georgia State University.

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” keeping the White House running. We talk with writer and documentary filmmaker Chris Whipple about his new book “The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff Define Every Presidency.”

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joined us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.  

Jim Brit

Actor Stephen Tobolowsky has appeared in over 100 movies and 200 TV shows. His most notable roles include Stu Beggs on Showtime’s "Californication" and Ned Ryerson" in the classic 1993 film "Groundhog Day." Tobolowsky was raised in the Jewish faith, but has struggled with his identity since an early age. He writes about it in his new book “My Adventures With God,” which comes out April 18.

Photo Courtesy of The Satanic Temple

The Satanic Temple has been trying provide a secular alternative to traditional religion for over two decades. What is the mission of the Temple, and what are common misconceptions? The Atlanta Chapter is fighting to host an official after-school program in Cobb County schools. We talk to Atlanta Chapter head Fred Mephisto about the goals of his organization.

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joins us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.  

Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

The paranormal is often in the shadows, but a new store in Atlanta brings witchcraft to the public. ATL Craft opened last month. It sells mini-cauldrons for the urban witch, handmade wands, plus "everything you need for your spell work." GPB Intern Olivia Reingold stopped by the shop to meet owner Haley Murphy.

Pages