Georgia

Ways to Connect

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Since the November election, the political drama in America has only heightened. Carol Anderson is a professor of African-American Studies at Emory University. Her latest book, “White Rage,” points to racial tensions as a cause of growing division. We assemble a panel to discuss what has changed since Trump took office, and how Americans are shifting their views. Also with us is Bret Stephens, conservative columnist for the New York Times. And Jared Yates Sexton, author and a professor of writing at Georgia Southern University.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Hundreds marched through Atlanta Sunday night, in a second day of protests against deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Some protesters also defaced a monument with ties to the Confederacy.

Macon Road To Bear Country Music Star's Name

Aug 11, 2017
Katie Atkinson / GPB News

 

One of country music’s biggest stars now has a street named after him in Macon.  

 

Jason Aldean returned to his hometown to accept the honor after he raised $500,000 for the children's hospital at Navicent Health.

 

The Academy of Country Music Entertainer of the Year says growing up in Macon had an impact on his music career.

 

CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES

Jimmy Carter sings the praises of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams; but then says it wasn’t an endorsement and that he will back whoever wins the Democratic nomination.

At an event here in Georgia, GOP candidate for governor Michael Williams wins the endorsement of staunch Trump supporter Roger Stone.

The Alabama special election to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate becomes a battle to test the popularity of President Trump and of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. 

Casino Regina / flickr

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on "Whose Line Is It Anyway?," a popular short-form improvisational comedy show. Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live on Aug. 11-12 at Dad’s Garage in Atlanta. We talked with him about his craft.

In the Breakroom this week we’ll talk about microchips, atheists, and disgruntled Google employees. Plus, we’ll discuss the ethics of getting an A for effort. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Christian Zsilavetz, Amy Condon, and Steve Brown.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

Bob Gruen

We add a couple more tunes to the Georgia Playlist, our essential list of songs that best represent Georgia. Today we feature Athens-band Shehehe, who release a new album, called “Endless Summer,” this weekend [August 12]. Drummer and singer Jason Fusco brings us his picks for the Georgia Playlist, including tunes by The Glands and Illegal Drugs.

Shehehe performs at the 40 Watt in Athens this Saturday at 9 p.m.

Ayanna Howard

Robots are coming and sooner than you think. That’s according our guest this week on Two Way Street: Georgia Tech robotics expert, Ayanna Howard

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

American University

It’s been three years since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. The chaos in Ferguson brought to light deeper and disturbing issues involved in policing African Americans. American University Law Professor Angela Davis has edited an anthology of essays about black men and boys who have died at the hands of police.

David McClister

Country artist Lucinda Williams first achieved commercial breakthrough with her 1998 album, “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road.” She’s won three Grammy Awards, and was named one of the greatest country artists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine this year. Now, she’s on tour promoting her 12th studio album, “The Ghosts of Highway 20,” which reflects on her time living in Georgia. 

Darren Michaels / Netflix

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road on Aug. 12 at Atlanta Symphony Hall. We talked with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

Nuclear Threat Initiative

Our guest on today’s show is former Georgia U.S. Senator Sam Nunn. Nunn served in the U.S. senate for 24 years. He was the chairman of the prestigious Armed Services Committee and of the Permanent Sub-Committee on Investigations. After retiring from the senate in 1997, he became the founder of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing catastrophic attacks with weapons of mass destruction.

Courtesy of the artist

Singer Judy Collins has been making music in many genres for six decades. She’s in Atlanta on Wednesday night for a performance at Atlanta Symphony Hall. She tells us about her creative process, working on duets, and her feelings about song competitions.

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Continuing disputes between the United States and Canada over lumber imports will not get in the way of a new factory announced Wednesday in Bibb County.  

 

Canada based Irving Consumer Products announced their intent to build a $400 million, 700,000 square foot plant  which will turn softwood lumber into toilet tissue in Macon. That will create 200 permanent jobs.

David Goldman / AP Photo

A recent study by the non-profit Prosperity Now finds white-owned businesses make, on average, nearly ten times as much as African-American-owned businesses in the South. It also shows black business owners have a harder time finding mentorship and capital. We discuss with Dr. Dennis Kimbro, Professor of Business at Clark Atlanta University.

Sportsgrid

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans. 

Candace Spates / On Second Thought

Clark Atlanta University this week welcomes its incoming freshman class in a way never done before-- with hacking. A six-hour technical marathon is open to as many as a thousand students. They will collaborate to code and come up with technical innovations that could change the world. The event is being labeled as the largest hackathon at a historically black college and university.

20th Century Fox

For years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” However, these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talked with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Orangutan That Used Sign Language Dies In Atlanta

Aug 8, 2017
Zoo Atlanta

Chantek, an orangutan who communicated with researchers using sign-language, has died at Zoo Atlanta.

 

He was 39, making him one of the oldest male orangutans living in captivity in North America.

Zoo Atlanta says Chantek died Monday. Cause of death isn't known, but the zoo says veterinarians had been treating him for progressive heart disease.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Old Shoe Woman / Foter

This week marks the beginning of school for many districts in Metro Atlanta. But as of mid-June, there were 1,400 vacancies in schools across the city. DeKalb County alone lost 900 teachers at the end of last school year.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 


Allison Goldey says there’s one big question that makes her job hard.

“How do we even think about solving this problem without knowing what we have?” she asks.

As the head of the Macon-Bibb County Land Bank, Goldey is on the front lines of the $15 million blight remediation effort in the city. The Land Bank buys blighted houses, which the county then demolishes. The thing is, Macon-Bibb County can’t really say where its blighted housing is.

Are some of the Republican Party’s top stars beginning to pave the way to run for president in 2020 if Donald Trump steps aside? On today’s show we’ll talk about a New York Times report that Vice President Mike Pence, Ohio Governor John Kasich, and senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are beginning to make the kind of moves that could position them to be ready for a run.  The story has infuriated the Vice President, who says it’s not true. But is it? Our panel weighs in.

Today [August 7] marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County.

Wikimedia Commons

Blue Cross Blue Shield is currently the only insurer on Georgia’s statewide exchange, and its premiums are set to go up as much as 40 percent by 2018. The insurer just announced a new policy limiting consumer coverage when it comes to emergency room visits. We talk with Andy Miller, editor of Georgia Health News, and Beth Stephens, Senior Director of Public Policy, Georgia Watch.

 

 

Georgia Congressman Austin Scott (R GA-08) wants to end a program that offers subsidized, low cost cell phones.

Scott introduced the End Taxpayer Funded Cell Phones Act in late July. It would end an Obama era program which provides basic smart phone service to people with low incomes for $9.25 a month.

Wikimedia Commons

Today on “Political Rewind,“ what comes next for the Plant Vogtle expansion? The $25 billion project has been in the works for years, but the builders – Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Toshiba – went bankrupt and future completion is questionable. Georgia Power customers have already paid additional fees for construction of the plant; what happens next? Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols joins us to discuss where we are and what it will take to move forward.

krnjn / Foter

The average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles rolled out on Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

Pages