Georgia

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On October​ ​12,​ ​1958, the​ ​Temple,​ ​Georgia’s​ ​largest synagogue,​ ​was​ ​bombed.​ ​Nobody was hurt in the explosion, but the community was shaken. A new play at the Alliance Theater in Atlanta recalls the attack, and its lasting effects. We spoke to Jimmy Maize, playwright and director of “The Temple Bombing.”

Critics Challenge Coyote-Killing Contest In Georgia

Feb 21, 2017
ODFW / CC

Critics are complaining about the state of Georgia's plan to stage a coyote-killing contest in metro Atlanta.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is promoting the Georgia Coyote Challenge. Participants can kill as many as five coyotes a month from March through August for a chance to win a lifetime hunting license.

But WSB-TV reports that critics are opposing the plan.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Public Domain

Today on “Political Rewind,” it’s Presidents Day! While some of you may celebrate with a day off from work, we couldn’t miss this chance to celebrate the nation’s highest office. Even our musical selections throughout the show pay homage to various Commanders-in-Chief. Can you name all of the tunes?

Georgia scored a big win in a long-running legal battle with Florida. Last week, a special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court said the high court should refuse Florida's request to cap Georgia’s water use. Florida argues the cap is needed because Georgia’s high rate of water consumption is dampening its oyster industry and state economy. E&E News reporter Amanda Reilly joins us to talk about this latest development in a decades-old water war.

Akhenaton06 / Foter

In 1967, the first African-American students were admitted to the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Joseph Hobbs, one of the first black students to graduate, was the first black faculty member at the school.

Doctor Hobbs is now Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, and is organizing the 50th anniversary of desegregation at that college. He joins us from Augusta to discuss decades of work in elevating African-American doctors at the school.

Photo courtesy of Trudy Nan Boyce

Author and former Atlanta Police Officer Trudy Nan Boyce published her first novel, “Out of the Blues,” last year. That story follows the detective work of Sarah Alt--a.k.a “Salt”--as she investigates often gruesome crimes in the Atlanta area.

The second installment of Detective Salt’s story, called “Old Bones,” follows the fictional shooting of students at Spelman College. That book hits shelves February 21. Author Trudy Nan Boyce join us to discuss her new novel.

Emily Jones / GPB

Cleaning up Georgia's largest public beach after Hurricane Matthew has cost Tybee Island about $3 million.

The Savannah Morning News reports the local government that runs the small seaside city detailed its costs from the October storm in a series of departmental documents.

Atlanta, Other Cities Eye Test Tracks For Self-Driving Cars

Feb 20, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Self-driving vehicles could begin tooling down a bustling Atlanta street full of cars, buses, bicyclists and college students, as the city vies with other communities nationwide to test the emerging technology.

Atlanta would become one of the largest urban areas for testing self-driving vehicles if plans come together for a demonstration as early as September.

Nationwide, 10 sites were designated last month as "proving grounds" for automated vehicles by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

niksnut / flickr

Georgia scored a big win in a long-running legal battle with Florida. Last week, a special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court said the high court should refuse Florida's request to cap Georgia’s water use. Florida argues the cap is needed because Georgia’s high rate of water consumption is dampening its oyster industry and state economy. E&E News reporter Amanda Reilly joined us to talk about this latest development in a decades-old water war.

Battle For Nerf Blaster Supremacy

Feb 20, 2017
Sean Powers / On Second Thought

There’s a war in Marietta, Georgia. It is a Nerf War. The members of the Southeast Nerf Club meet at East Cobb Park once a month to shoot for foam dart supremacy. "On Second Thought" intern Keenan Jones was on the front lines and brought back this audio postcard.

PINTEREST

Today’s music minute features a member of one of Georgia’s most popular bands. Coy Bowles of the Atlanta-based Zac Brown Band was born on this day in Thomaston in 1979.

Clyde Stubblefield, the funk drummer whose work with James Brown made him one of the most sampled musicians in history, died Saturday morning in Madison, Wis., his publicist confirmed. Stubblefield was 73; his publicist did not provide a cause of death.

On today’s show we talk to two singer-songwriters who are part of the rich community of musical artists who live and work in Nashville – one of the great music mecca’s of this country.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we are one month into the Trump administration and for members of the American media, it’s been a very rocky road so far. From Steve Bannon’s declaration that the media are the “opposition party” to yesterday’s unorthodox presidential press briefing, the disconnect is very real and very apparent. 

Sean Powers and Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

Since we did our show live from Savannah for the Savannah Book Festival, we organized a special edition of The Breakroom featuring all authors. The panel included Alejandro Danois, Karin Slaughter, Nicki Salcedo, and Mike Lowery.

Matt Barnett / Flickr

A new education bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Kevin Tanner would allow the state to provide systems of support and assistance for low-performing schools in Georgia.

One of the featured authors at the festival is Forbes Financial Columnist John Tamny, who is author of the book “Who Needs the Fed?” We take a look at the role of the fed, and ask Tamny about how it may change in the Trump administration. The Fed also will see some big changes this month in Atlanta, as the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta steps down.

 

 

Georgia House Panel Approves Bill Allowing Guns On Campus

Feb 17, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Licensed gun owners could carry concealed handguns on public college campuses under legislation that began advancing Thursday in the Georgia House despite the Republican governor's forceful veto of a similar bill last year.

A subcommittee of the House Public Safety Committee approved the bill sponsored by Rep. Mandi Ballinger, R-Canton, sending it on to the full committee. Georgia is among 17 states that ban concealed weapons on campus.

Emory University / flickr

Dennis Lockhart, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, will step down this month. The Federal Reserve may be in for changes in the months ahead. It is an important agency, but there’s one problem. Not a lot of average Americans understand what the Fed is or what it does. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.

Climate Reality Project

Several hundred climate scientists and public health professionals descended on the Carter Center in Atlanta today. It was for a climate and health conference organized by former Vice President Al Gore. 

New research from the Pew Research Center finds over a quarter of Americans adults haven’t read a book in the last year--in part or in whole. That includes all forms of reading, such as print, e-books, and audio books. We talk about this with Austin Dickson, Executive Director of Literacy Action, and Emily Rubin, Educational Outreach Specialist for the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta.

Ghost Coast Distillery

In search of some fun? Savannah Tribune Vice President Tanya Milton and Visit Savannah Digital Content Coordinator Larissa Allen have a few ideas for your Savannah weekend.

Larissa's picks:

Senators Work To Slash THC Potency In Medical Cannabis

Feb 16, 2017
Bob Doran / Flickr

Georgia Senators are working to slash the potency of medical cannabis oil while slightly expanding access.

The bill passed the full Senate Thursday with a vote of 41-12 after lengthy debate and the rejection of three amendments proposed during discussion.

Bryan Cox / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into immigration issues, something that touches the lives and businesses of more Georgians than you might realize. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

How will you celebrate when you pay off your house? After 20 years in her home purchased with the help of Macon Area Habitat for Humanity, Lillie Ward burned her mortgage.

m01229 / Flickr

A Savannah legislator says Georgia needs to revise its definition of where beaches end and private property begins.

Republican Rep. Jesse Petrea is a co-sponsor of a bill to revise the 1979 law that protects Georgia's dunes, beaches, shoals and sandbars — thus also protecting barrier island property from erosion and hurricane damage.

Lawmakers Trying To Ease Restrictions On Alcohol Sales

Feb 15, 2017
Thomas Cizauskas / CC

The Georgia brewery bill has turned into the booze bill.

Lawmakers combined legislation that allows breweries to sell directly to the customer with another proposal that would permit distilleries to do the same thing.

UGA Approves $63 Million Sanford Stadium Enhancement

Feb 15, 2017
Pruddle / Wikimedia Commons

A $63 million enhancement to Georgia's Sanford Stadium that will provide a new locker room has been approved by the athletic association's board of directors.

The project also includes a new video board, a plaza for fans to use on game days and a room to host recruits. The project approved at the board's quarterly meeting on Tuesday is expected to be completed in time for the 2018 season.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

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