Georgia

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Steve Helber / The Associated Press

The Southern Poverty Law Center says there were two major spikes in the twentieth century for when Confederate memorials and symbols were dedicated: during the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights Movement. Elizabeth Herbin-Triant

Wikimedia Commons

Across the South, you find Confederate monument relics: often outside a courthouse, or in a cemetery. One monument was vandalized the end of last year at historic Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Georgia. The statue featured a Confederate soldier holding a rifle. Cemetery staff found the soldier's face smashed, and his hands missing.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

Keith Hadley/AJC Staff / Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult?

Johnny Edwards / Jredwards@ajc.com / Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Last summer, hundreds gathered in downtown Augusta to protest against a confederate statue there. The NAACP also issued a statement that calls for its removal. But some say it should stay up. One of them is Steve Oney, former Georgian and author of the book "And the Dead Shall Rise: the Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank." Oney offers us a commentary.

Trevor Young / GPB

We’ve spent a lot of time talking about Georgia’s Confederate memorials. Now we visit one. In Athens, you almost certainly run into the obelisk downtown memorializing confederate soldiers. It sits right on Broad Street, just feet away from UGA’s famous arches. Producer Trevor Young asks Athenians how they feel about the monument in an audio postcard.

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia primary elections are three months away, but already candidates for governor have amassed $10 million, and one GOP candidate spends a chunk of his case on a Super Bowl ad.  We’ll look at the latest fundraising totals.  Then, the possibility of another government shutdown looks later this week.  Can the White House and Congress reach a deal on immigration before then or will they once again kick the government spending authorization can down the road?  Plus, President Trump insists the Devin Nunes memo proves the Mueller Investigation is a fraud. 

Shealah Craighead

The Breakroom gang joined guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Georgia State University law professor Tanya Washington, children's book author Mike Lowery, and Jessica Walden of Rock Candy Tours in Macon.

 

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

The Tide Pod Challenge has sent dozens of people, many of them young teens, to hospitals across the country. Eating laundry detergent may seem like a new level of stupidity, but kids and adolescents have been doing dumb things to impress each other for a long time. And, despite first appearances, there might actually be good reasons why. Joining us to talk through this are Catherine O’Neal, Assistant Research Scientist at UGA’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and Jay Hathaway, Senior Writer at the Daily Dot.

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