Georgia

Ways to Connect

Nationally, about 60% of immigrants forced to go to immigration court win their cases and avoid deportation. In Lumpkin, Ga., thousands of immigrants go through that court each year; more than  97%  lose their cases and are deported. NPR investigative reporter Caitlin Dickerson looked at how the court operates, and shares the story of one immigrant whose fate was determined in Lumpkin. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

It looks like the Georgia Milestones test might not be tied to grade promotion this year after all.

So far, students in third, fifth and eighth grades had to perform up to grade level in core areas of study to pass onto the next grade.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Governor Nathan Deal is poised to make a decision on "campus carry" legislation on Tuesday. At a state budget signing this morning, Governor Deal assured reporters that his decision on campus carry will come.

“I don’t walk away from bills, I either sign ‘em or veto ‘em," said Deal.

The Governor has yet to give any indication of his leanings, but has clearly indicated that he will announce whether or not to sign the legislation tomorrow. 

Governor Deal Signs Fiscal Year 2017 State Budget

May 2, 2016
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Gov. Nathan Deal traveled  around the state Monday to sign the $23.7 billion fiscal year 2017 budget that includes money for a pay boost for state employees and substantial funding for transportation infrastructure projects.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

One in 68 children are born with autism in the United States. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control. In Georgia the rate is even higher.

It's the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prize. We'll spend some time with past winners who have a connection to Georgia all year long in a new series we're calling Pulitzer Peaches. You may know our first guest from his hilarious and satirical cartoons in The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

    

Alison Rosa

Georgia native and crime writer Karin Slaughter is the author of several international best-sellers. Her latest book "Pretty Girls" is about two women whose teenage sister vanished without a trace. The paperback edition of the book came out last week. 

  

We speak with Slaughter about the inspiration for the book, what makes a good thriller, and the reason why she sets her novels in Georgia.

Public Domain / White House Photo Office

It was more than 48 years ago, but I remember vividly the night of March 31, 1968, when Lyndon Johnson surprised the world by announcing he would not run for a second full term as president. The stunning news came at the end of a speech from the Oval Office in which Johnson announced he was halting the bombing raids over North Vietnam – and it took my breath away. My anti-war friends and I had been demonstrating against the Vietnam War and against LBJ for many months (“Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today!”).

Trevor Young / GPB

Today the panel looks at a number of important state news stories.

Governor Deal has just three days left to announce whether he will sign or veto the controversial “campus carry” bill. The panel tries to read the tea leaves to determine what Deal is thinking as he approaches the deadline.

flickr.com

Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psycho-educational programs." But now, another investigation into these special programs has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Judge Horace Ward of Georgia died on Saturday, April 23 at the age of 88. 

Ward graduated with honors from Morehouse College and then got a master's degree from Atlanta University. Those are both historically black institutions. When he applied to the School of Law at the University of Georgia in 1950, he was refused because of his race.  The Board of Regents offered to help him go to school in another state. But Ward insisted he wanted to study at UGA. Ward's case was thrown out seven years later and he went to Northwestern University in Illinois where he earned his law degree. 

GPB News/Linda Chen

We’re joined by our Friday panel in The Breakroom to discuss and debate the week’s news. We talk about the University of Georgia paying Ludacris a huge amount of cash, liquor and condoms for a 15 minute performance, Beyonce’s new visual album called “Lemonade”, and how the FBI fabricated evidence that sent dozens of people to death row.  

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A string of small arsons and racist graffiti at Mercer University in Macon are distracting students at the end of the semester when they would otherwise be worried about finals.

The graffiti was both written and removed Wednesday night on doors in Sherwood Hall, a co-ed freshman dormitory.  Freshman finance and accounting major Kenny Olaganju didn’t see the graffiti before it was removed, but he heard about it.

“All that I heard is that someone went through on the first floor and wrote the N-word with a hard R on peoples’ doors,” he said

Please join us Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater. I'll be sitting down with research scholar Meg Jacobs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. We'll discuss her compelling new book, "Panic at the Pump: The Energy Crisis and the Transformation of American Politics in the 1970s."

An Atlanta artist is trying to get beyond the statistics about sexual abuse. All month long, Jessica Caldas has marked an “X” on the ground in chalk every 107 seconds. That’s how often someone is sexually abused in the U.S., according to federal data. We talk with her about the message she hopes people will take away from her art. 

Brandon Barr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbarr/

Consider this Atlanta. Are you willing to pay a half-penny sales tax to expand MARTA?

That question will be answered when voters go to the polls in November.

MARTA Board Chairman Robbie Ashe calls the upcoming vote “the most significant thing to happen to MARTA in its history.”

Visit Tybee

Clinton Edminster, executive director of Art Rise Savannah, and Megan White, marketing projects manager of Visit Savannah, offer up some ways to have fun in the Savannah area this weekend.

Alexia Ridley / GPB

Family members of the victims joined hundreds of friends, students, and staff at a Thursday evening ceremony on the University of Georgia campus in Athens honoring the four UGA students killed in a collision Wednesday night.

Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these events are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

On today’s show, we look at the massive victories that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump scored in the five primary elections that were held yesterday.

Trevor Young / GPB

Governor Nathan Deal signed a bill Wednesday to amend criminal justice procedures in Georgia.

Marcus Autism Center

One of the first signs of autism in infants is the delay of what's known as babbling. Babbling is exactly what it sounds like: indiscernible words of jumbled consonants and vowels strung together. It's adorable when babies do it, but it’s also an important stage of language development. Gordon Ramsay, a doctor at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta, has collected the largest database of baby babbles.

flickr.com

Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these gatherings are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.

The names James Brown and Apollo Theater have practically become synonymous; it's hard to think of one without the other. Beginning in 1963, Brown released three albums recorded there. But there was a fourth — recordings from Sept. 13 and 14, 1972 — that has been buried ever since. Now, Get Down with James Brown: Live At The Apollo Vol. 4 is finally out on vinyl, with a CD to follow this summer.

YouTube

The recovery continues following this month's devastating earthquake in Ecuador. Global relief organizations have crews on the ground to provide assistance. We talk with a relief workers from Georgia-based MAP International about how they are helping and what more there is to be done.

commons.wikipedia.org

The growing need for teachers in Georgia has led the Savannah-Chatham school district to rely on an often overlooked education program.  Alternative Pathways to Teaching allows anyone with a bachelor’s degree to earn a teaching certificate while serving as an interim teacher. The program has ushered in hundreds of new teachers to the Savannah school system.

Chatham County

Chatham County is voting a lot this year. Between special elections, primaries, and the general there will be at least five elections - and runoffs could bring the total to eight. Members of the elections board say the county could spend $1 million on elections this year. Now, they’re looking for changes.

Board chair Tom Mahoney told GPB’s Emily Jones all these elections are an opportunity for voters - but tough on officials.

The runoff in the special election to finish the House dist. 162 seat of the late Bob Bryant is Tuesday, Apr. 26. That term ends this year.

Governor Deal Signs Rape Kit Bill Into Law

Apr 26, 2016
Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Nathan Deal has signed a bill mandating the timely processing of rape kits for sexual assault victims. 

The law, signed Tuesday, requires law enforcement officials to collect forensic evidence from sexual assaults within 96 hours of being notified and to send that evidence to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation within 30 days.

A Macon Program To Revitalize a Neighborhood Expands

Apr 26, 2016

A program in Macon-Bibb County that pays the down payment for Macon homes is going to expand. The target is the Bealls Hill neighborhood, a place that used to be downtrodden but is now revitalized. Twenty-thousand dollar down payments are provided as Mercer matches Knight Foundation money. So far since 2007, about a third of the project has been bought with this assistance. Now, Historic Macon wants to expand to other businesses who might match that Knight money. GPB's Michael Caputo talked with Ethiel Garlington of Historic Macon about the effort. 

Pages