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Photo courtesy of Sheri Riley

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” a U.S. Senate scuffle over the Jeff Sessions nomination is sparking lots of conversation. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) shut down Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) when she started quoting a letter that Coretta Scott King wrote denouncing Sessions in 1986.

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

jontangerine / Foter

The battle for equal rights in America has centered around many modes of transportation--buses, trains, and streetcars for example. But one more form of travel should be added to that list: Airplanes. That’s the assertion of a new book from UGA Press called “Jim Crow Terminals: The Desegregation of American Airports.” The book covers the largely undocumented segregation at Southern airports in the 20th century. With us to discuss this is the author, Anke Ortlepp. She’s a Professor of North American and British History at the University of Kassel in Germany.

MarkMoz12 / Foter

A new report from housing site Trulia suggests house flipping activity has increased to the highest in a decade in 2016, with the Atlanta metro area ranking eighth in the country. They find that in 2016, 7.9 percent of all home sales in Atlanta were house flips, a modest 0.6 percent jump from the year before. We speak with Ralph McLaughlin, Chief Economist for Trulia, about these findings.

slgckgc / flickr

A recent report from the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows Georgia leads most states in harassment by debt collectors. Often these are for debts people already paid, or don’t even owe. Beth Kobliner is on a mission to make sure you and your kids don’t fall prey to one of these collectors.

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Fans of the Atlanta Falcons are slowly working past a crushing defeat in the Super Bowl. The team gave up a 25 point lead and squandered away a game that was well in hand for the first three quarters.  

As the Falcons returned back to Atlanta on Monday, many fans took to the airwaves on sports radio shows to voice their disappointment. But psychology experts say if you hold on to negative emotions too long it could end up hurting you physically. 

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Each week during Black History Month, we will bring you a discussion centered around African American issues. In this episode, we discuss the role of black women in society and the difficulty of being a double minority.

 

We sit down with Stephanie Sears of Clark Atlanta University. She is an adjunct professor of Africana Women’s Studies. We discuss some of the issues facing black women today, what steps can be taken to achieve greater equality, and the idea of the “Angry Black Woman.”

Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.

This is show is a celebration of Black History Month. Since 1970, February has been dedicated to celebrating the contributions and achievements of African-Americans. We talk about the "Bank Black" movement, some tragic history in Savannah, a daring escape from Macon, and even how to handle a controversial term in the classroom.

 

A study by Emory University found that people view the term “African-American” more favorably than “black.” We talked with Erika Hall, who worked on the study, about what this might mean for prospective job seekers.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we're trying to distract ourselves after the unfortunate outcome of Super Bowl LI, so we're wading back into the national political waters! We're greatly pleased to have Time magazine editor-at-large David von Drehle joining us from KCUR in Kansas City to talk about the current cover article: "Is Steve Bannon the Second Most Powerful Man in the World?"

Photo courtesy of Kim Sorrells

Reverend Kim Sorrells grew up in conservative Alabama, and is now based in Atlanta. When Sorrells was in seminary, they, Sorrells' preferred pronoun, decided to transition to become gender-queer. Sorrells still faces daily struggles in reconciling Sorrells' identity with religious colleagues. We hear Sorrells' story, and a plight for a broader understanding of transgender individuals. 

DeeMo / Foter

Atlanta has seen a striking number of attacks by loose dogs in recent weeks. One such attack resulted in the death of a 6-year-old boy in southwest Atlanta. We talk about these events with Ellen Eldridge, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. We also discuss how this may or may not affect the animal laws in the state with Jessica Rock, a Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Georgia Ports Authority

On Monday, the Georgia Ports Authority announced the sale of five parcels of land for commercial development at GPA’s Savannah River International Trade Park. The new development can hold up to five million square feet of logistics space and is less than five miles away from Garden City Container Terminal.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court. Trump has promised to only appoint “pro-life judges.” Members of Congress are also pushing legislation to restrict abortions. A bill sponsored by Georgia Congressman Jody Hice would legally define human life as beginning at conception. The bill also states that embryos are allowed the same “right to life” as human beings. We’ve explored the abortion debate before.

mathiaswasik / Foter

Under a new, conservative administration, rights for LGBT individuals and families may come under threat. We discuss the status of current state and federal rights for LGBT citizens, and look at what battles might be ahead. With us is Atlanta-based LGBT activist Robbie Medwed, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Reporter Kristina Torres, and Lila Bradley, family law attorney at Claiborne Fox Bradley LLC.

Thomas Hawk / Foter

When you watch any high-profile awards ceremony, like the Oscars or the Emmys, you go in knowing a lot of it will be Hollywood fluff. But at least with those, you’re fairly confident that quality films and TV will be recognized.

 

 

That, unfortunately, is not the case with the Grammys. While the Emmys, for example, have rightfully helped put series like "Breaking Bad" or "Game of Thrones" in the history books of quality shows, the Grammys tend to write the wrong history.

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Tens of thousands of Georgia children never get their teeth cleaned.

It’s partly a problem of geography: kids have to travel too far to get to a dentist. Then there’s state law, which says a dentist must be present when a dental hygienist is working.

But that could change this year because of a set of bills in the General Assembly that would make it easier for hygienists to offer services on their own.

Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians

Our show today is devoted to looking at the work of one of Georgia’s literary giants: Carson McCullers. She was born in Columbus in 1917. Her father ran a jewelry store. Her mother’s chief occupation always seemed to be doting upon and caring for her sickly daughter Carson.

At lunch hour, the line stretches out the door at Taqueria del Sol on Atlanta's west side. Inside, the tiny kitchen is a swirl of activity.

"This is my crew," says co-owner and chef Eddie Hernandez. "They're all from Mexico."

The menu is a hybrid of cuisine from his native Monterrey, Mexico, and down-home Southern cooking, like tangy turnip greens seasoned with red chilies and re-fried black-eyed peas.

"The food can get us together," Hernandez says, "and make us think differently about each other."

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” it's week two of the Trump administration and Twitter continues to play an important role in tracking the thoughts of POTUS. From chiding Iran over its test of a ballistic missile: "Iran is playing with fire," to zinging the man who replaced him on his TV show: "Yes, Arnold Schwarzenegger did a really bad job as Governor of California and even worse on the Apprentice...but at least he tried hard!" But our panel also discussed a serious topic that Trump brought up at the National Prayer Breakfast: His plans to abolish the so-called "Johnson amendment" which says that 501C-3 organizations cannot endorse political candidates.

Police: Allman Brothers Drummer Trucks Killed Himself

Feb 3, 2017
Carl Lender / Flickr

Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks killed himself in front of his wife, police reports released Wednesday show.

The 69-year-old Trucks shot himself in the head Jan. 27 at his home, the West Palm Beach police reports show.

Trucks was one of two original drummers, along with Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson, who helped form the rhythms and the drive for The Allman Brothers. Formed in 1969 and led by Duane and Gregg Allman, the group helped define the Southern rock sound that incorporated blues, rock, country and jazz.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom is back, and there’s plenty to talk about. We’ll discuss the firing of former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, and if she has a place in Georgia politics. Then, we look at stories surrounding the Atlanta Falcons, including their increased national popularity and alleged overuse of painkillers. We’ll also see if classic movie reboots are any good, and we'll put to bed the debate whether Jack could’ve survived in “Titanic."

Atlanta Falcons

On Sunday, the Atlanta Falcons meet the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI. It will wind up as the Falcons first Super Bowl win, or the Patriots’ fifth. GPB Senior Sports correspondent Jon Nelson joined us for a preview.

New America / Foter

Doctor Tom Frieden was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following President Trump’s inauguration two weeks ago, Frieden stepped down from the CDC. Tom Frieden joins us to talk about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there moving forward.

Doctor Tom Frieden was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following President Trump’s Inauguration two weeks ago, Frieden stepped down from the CDC. Tom Frieden joins us to talk about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there moving forward.

On Sunday, the Atlanta Falcons meet the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI. It will wind up as the Falcons first Super Bowl win, or the Patriots’ fifth. GPB Senior Sports correspondent Jon Nelson joins us for a preview.

This week President Trump signed a “two-for-one” executive order that says for every new regulation that government agencies pass, two old ones must be eliminated. Trump says the action will help small and large businesses succeed. 

To learn more about regulations and the effect they may have in Georgia, we sit down with Antonio Saravia. He’s an assistant professor of economics and director of Mercer University’s BB&T Center for Undergraduate Research in Public Policy and Capitalism.

Bubba73 / Wikimedia Commons

At the time, it was the deadliest crash in aviation history. On Sunday morning, June 3, 1962, Atlanta was stunned by the news that a plane carrying 106 of its citizens had crashed on take-off at Orly Airfield near Paris, France. Below, you can watch the 2001 GPB documentary "The Day Atlanta Stood Still."

.sanden. / Foter

New legislation has passed the Georgia Senate which would allow local breweries to sell beer directly to consumers. The bill would do away with the current need to sell beer through tour packages. We talk with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin, and Andrew Lorber, brewer and co-founder of Orpheus Brewing in Atlanta.

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