Haiti

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Paul Farmer has spent a lot of time in Haiti over the past three decades. Still, what he saw on his visit this past week left him "surprised and upset and humbled."

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Who's in charge of the aid?

That's the question in the hurricane-ravaged southwest of Haiti.

Should politicians hand it out? Or aid groups? Or religious leaders?

Pastor Louis Masil, who lives in the tiny village of Banatte, doesn't think the government should be in control.

"Since the independence of Haiti, the culture was always all governments, all officials only care for themselves," he says. "They only care for stealing the money and not helping the communities."

The Dumont section of Port Salut on Haiti's southwest coast is spread over rolling green hills that used to be rich with coconut, mango and banana trees. But Hurricane Matthew toppled most of those trees. It tore apart the simple concrete and sheet-metal houses in the area. It killed livestock, destroyed crops, smashed businesses.

Emmanuello Charlien is part of a team trying to tally the damage of Matthew here. Charlien points out a pile of metal that used to be a cellphone tower.

In Port Salut, the individual signs of the Hurricane Matthew's destruction are everywhere. A giant mango tree with its thick trunk snapped like a wishbone. A cinder block house crumpled on its foundation. But it's only as you continue to drive through this part of the coast that you see the extent of the damage. The devastation goes on and on. Hillsides are swept clean of trees. Neighborhood after neighborhood is in ruin.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Haiti hundreds of thousands of people affected by Hurricane Matthew are still waiting for aid.

The death toll is in the hundreds and is expected to rise. The Haitian president calls the situation in the southwest a catastrophe.

At the Lycee Philip Garrier, a high school in the hard-hit town of Les Cayes that's serving as a shelter, there's growing frustration among people who lost everything to the storm.

Hundreds of people took shelter in the school, sleeping on classroom floors. Most say they now have nowhere else to go.

Hurricane Matthew lashed Haiti, leaving the country with damaged infrastructure and hundreds dead.

In addition to physical damage, the island now faces health risks, the displacement of thousands and a logistical nightmare as its people try to rebuild their lives.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right. Hurricane Matthew is spinning up the Florida coast right now. Hundreds of thousands of people are without power. Dennis Feltgen of the National Hurricane Center is monitoring this storm.

Haiti's electoral council has postponed the country's presidential election after Hurricane Matthew devastated the country. The nationwide vote was supposed to be held Sunday.

The electoral council did not announce a new date.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET with further states of emergency in the U.S.

Hurricane Matthew crashed into southwestern Haiti as a Category 4 storm Tuesday morning, dumping rain and scouring the land with maximum sustained winds of 145 miles per hour.

It is the first Category 4 storm to make landfall in Haiti since 1964, when Hurricane Cleo also hit the island nation's southwestern peninsula.

In the fall of 2010, months after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, a new disaster began: a cholera outbreak that killed thousands of people and continues to sicken people across the country.