history

Zora Neale Hurston, the celebrated Harlem Renaissance writer and anthropologist, has a new bestseller out nearly 60 years after her death. She wrote "Barracoon: The Story of The Last 'Black Cargo'" almost a century ago. It’s the nonfiction story of Oluale Kossola, the last survivor of the African slave trade in the United States. Kossola was sold into slavery and taken from West Africa when he was 19.


Maura Currie / GPB News

Urban archeology has unearthed centuries-old artifacts from beneath Atlanta. And lots of it is simply very old trash, leftover from landfills and dumps. Now, a team from Georgia State University is working with students to catalog the artifacts and teach history, writing and anthropology in the process. It’s called the Phoenix Project, and we had three of the faculty involved with it in the studio: Jeffrey Glover, Brennan Collins, and Robin Wharton.

Imperial War Museum

During December 1914, something remarkable happened. For a week before Christmas Day, French, British and German soldiers laid down their arms. They talked, sang carols, and wished each other Merry Christmas. This was known as the Christmas Truce, and did not happen again. We learned more about this piece of holiday history from Emory University professor Patrick Allitt.

 

 

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

Georgia’s legislative session begins January 8, 2018. But a bill addressing the debate over Confederate monuments has already been filed by Decatur’s State Representative, Mary Margaret Oliver. The bill would allow local governments to decide whether or not to keep or remove monuments.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The next time the you open your kitchen cabinets, consider this: a lot of the processed food we eat today started off as food for soldiers. The Army has a long history of culinary innovation that’s trickled down to our homes. We listened back to our conversation with writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo, author of the book "Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the U.S.

Elizabeth Tammi / GPB News

 

In September, the home of Ruth Hartley Mosley, a prominent figure in Macon’s history, was officially placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Reverend Levornia Franklin Jr. welcomed guests to the ceremony at Mosley’s former home on Spring Street.

 

“Good morning, and welcome to the Ruth Hartley Mosley Memorial Women’s Center. Come on, give yourselves a hand for coming out this morning," he said.

 

GPB News/Emily Cureton

In South Georgia’s Wiregrass Country, a plaque in the town of Quitman marks a hanging place. It’s where, in August of 1864, four men were executed for plotting a slave rebellion. Over the next century, mob violence against African-Americans often erupted in South Georgia.

This is where our Senior Editor Don Smith was born and raised. He moved away in 1958. Don recently went back to his hometown to mark the anniversary of the Civil War hanging, and talk with longtime residents about how they remember the county’s history of racial violence. GPB's Emily Cureton reports. 

bamaboy1941 / flickr

All this month, we tour historic theaters in our state, as part of National Historic Preservation Month. We continue our series at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center in Madison, Georgia. It's a performing and visual arts facility. Filmmaker Jesse Freeman explains how this space shaped his love for filmmaking.

Lewis Hine

Early 20th century photographer Lewis Hine made his mark by documenting the working conditions in mill towns, like those in Georgia. His photos led to major reforms in child labor laws. An exhibit at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Georgia tells the story of one family he documented.

Amazon.com

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into WWI. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war.

Georgia American Revolution Preservation Alliance

More than 200 years ago, the British Army made its first push into the American South. The Georgian Continental Army lost to the British during the American Revolution at Brier Creek. Today, another battle is being waged over threats to the preservation of this historic 500-acre site.

Gabrielle Ware

J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers shared their timeless story of love.

This February is Black History Month, a time when the nation honors the contributions of African Americans. On Second Thought host Celeste Headlee says she doesn't really like Black History Month, but not for the reasons you might expect. 

Robin B. Williams / SCAD

History is all around in Savannah - including underfoot, according to Robin Williams, chair of the Architectural History department at SCAD. He talked with GPB's Emily Jones about why he says paving is an important part of history.

History Of Presidential Inaugurations

Jan 20, 2017

Donald Trump makes history on Friday by becoming the 45th president of the United States. What follows is a weekend of inauguration pageantry, a parade, several inaugural balls -- even fireworks.The presidential inauguration has a rich history dating back to George Washington. For more on that legacy, we turned to historian Kenneth C.

Ethiel Garlington, executive director of Historic Macon, talks with Josephine Bennett of GPB Macon about what projects the preservation group will take on in 2017.   

Grant Blankenship / GPB

It's a landmark that will soon be moved to a new patch of land. 

The home Little Richard called home as a kid in Macon's Pleasant Hill neighborhood is one of eight slated to be moved out of the way of a massive Georgia Department of Transportation expansion of the Interstate 75/Interstate 16 interchange. About 40 other homes will be demolished. 

SCMPD

Work has resumed at a downtown Savannah construction site after two cannonballs were found and detonated there this week. An Explosive Ordnance Disposal team from Ft. Stewart deemed them unsafe to transport.

Police called them Civil War-era  landmines. But Todd Groce, President and CEO of the Georgia Historical Society, says ammunition was last stored at the site before the war, so they're likely older.

Kevin Baggott / flickr

The longer a building has been around, the more likely people will say that it’s haunted. The Fox Theatre in Atlanta opened in 1929 and some say a few of the millions who’ve passed through those doors still remain. The theater hosts ghost tours this time of year. We sent producer Sean Powers to learn about spirits that refuse to leave...even after the curtain comes down.

An interview with former Fox Theatre organist Bob Van Camp, whose ashes are stored in the Fox Theatre auditorium:

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