immigration

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it would halt its Legal Orientation Program, which provides legal advice and information to detained immigrants. The DOJ has also suspended a telephone helpline. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) says this isn't the only obstacle immigrants face when it comes to legal assistance. In a new lawsuit, the SPLC claims federal immigration officials make it difficult for detainees to communicate with their attorneys. In the lawsuit, the Southern Poverty Law Center calls out two Georgia detention centers as part of the problem. SPLC legal director Lisa Graybill and immigration lawyer Hiba Ghalib talked with us about immigrants' access to legal assistance.  

Kate Brumback / AP Photo/File

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it would halt its Legal Orientation Program, which provides legal advice and information to detained immigrants. The DOJ has also suspended a telephone helpline.

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) says this isn't the only obstacle immigrants face when it comes to legal assistance. In a new lawsuit, the SPLC claims federal immigration officials make it difficult for detainees to communicate with their attorneys. In the lawsuit, the Southern Poverty Law Center calls out two Georgia detention centers as part of the problem. 

Stephen Fowler (GPB)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms calls for the resignations of almost everyone in city leadership.  Will the move help the city begin moving past a corruption scandal and help Bottoms separate herself from her predecessor?  National Guard troops amass on the US-Mexico border under orders of President Trump, who says he will not negotiate on a long-term DACA solution, while here in Georgia, the issue is top of mind for Republican candidates for office.   A leading immigration lawyer joins us to discuss what's happening.  Plus, Democrats seeking to oust

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Georgia is a hub for first generation immigrants. For the last two decades, a mariachi band in the Atlanta metro area has been working to bring all people together through music by adapting to the culture of the South. The band is called Mariachi Mexicanisimo, and On Second Thought producer Sean Powers caught a performance at a Mexican restaurant in the town of Lilburn, Georgia. 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In less than two weeks, a critical program for many immigrants in the U.S. illegally expires. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, shields immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children from being deported. The program’s future is still unclear. Emory University professor Marie Marquardt has been watching this closely.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the U.S. Senate shoots down Senator David Perdue’s plan to dramatically curtail legal immigration and it fails to find common ground on any immigration reform measure.  

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

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